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Chicago minister Derrick B. Wells shares 12 steps to happiness

His new book draws lessons from the cult martial arts movie ‘The Last Dragon’

The most recent Happiness Report revealed that happiness in America has fallen to its lowest score since 2006, due primarily to social issues rather than economic causes. Taking this into consideration, one Chicago reverend has formulated Guidelines for a Master: 12 Steps to an Extremely Happy Life, a practical guide to help readers pursue happiness.

Derrick B. Wells, senior minister of Christ Universal Temple in Chicago, felt compelled to write the guidelines after noticing a shift in energy and attitude during the 2016 presidential election.

“There just seemed to be a great deal of angst in the public space,” Wells said. “I wanted to be able to offer a writing that could perhaps serve as a counterbalance to some of that dialogue and at the same time give the reader some very practical steps and things that they could do to begin to effectively reclaim some of what they might’ve been giving away in terms of their personal power.”

Settling on the 12 steps, Wells said, was a twofold process. He had to find ways to narrow down the steps in terms of practicality while making his book stand out from other self-help books and articles. Wells’ use of two key components makes all the difference: First, the guidelines can be followed by anyone, regardless of where they are in their lives, Wells said. “There’s also a spiritual connotation [the number] 12 carries with it as some sense of completion and fulfillment.”

Second, Wells draws parallels with the 1985 cult classic The Last Dragon, about a young man looking for “the master” to help him attain the highest level of martial arts expertise. He uses examples from various scenes and turns them into relatable lessons.

“Leroy serves as a wonderful symbol as how we oftentimes think that the pursuit of fulfillment exists outside of ourselves,” Wells said of the lead character. “And so, in the movie, he’s really kind of fascinated with this idea of meeting the master and being able to attain the glow. He feels that his journey to meet the master and to learn from the master will be the same. That served as a catalyst to help him get to that glow, that enlightenment. If you look at the story … he’s demonstrating incredible awareness and mastery.”

In some ways, Wells leaned on his own experiences. As a Chicago native, Wells knows how the surrounding environment can affect people. According to the Urban Institute, the rate of long-term anxiety and worry among Chicago youths hovers around 24.1 percent, while the national average sits at 3.5 percent. But Wells believes hearts and minds can always be changed and damage done from environmental factors isn’t irreversible.

“I think we’re all, to some degree or another, a product of our environment. We also recognize, in being products of our environment, to a very large extent it’s how we process our environment that gives us the ability to navigate it effectively or not,” Wells said.

“It helps to have a sense of self-determination and to be able to move out of an experience that you have outgrown. As someone who was a drug dealer, in a gang, who spent time in county jail and have done things I’m not proud of, I still consider myself a rose that grew from concrete. I learned how to make different decisions, and through learning how to make different decisions I was able to create a different life.”

Wells hopes that those who read his book will not only gain a positive outlook about what is possible in their lives but also gain an understanding of the tools that the book offers.

“I don’t want the book to only be informative. I don’t want it to be only transformative. I want it to be practical,” Wells said. “The content within Guidelines is intended to be very practical and spiritual so that anyone at any knowledge or level of education, experience or background can have a tool. Even if it’s a single tool that they take away — a single tool that they can be able to use to build and design and create a life that works for them.

“I want Guidelines to serve as motivation to get into action. A plan without action is really just a dream.”

Maya Jones is an associate editor at The Undefeated. She is a native New Orleanian who enjoys long walks down Frenchmen Street and romantic dates to Saints games.