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A new Morehouse man surprises his mom and aunt

High school senior announces his college admission with Christmas gifts of personalized T-shirts

2:32 PMOn Christmas Day, Barrington Lincoln surprised his mother and aunt with personalized T-shirts from Morehouse College.

“You know what this means,” he says in a video of the moment. “I got in.”

The two most influential women in his life were now the mother and aunt of a Morehouse College student. His mom, Lisa McDonald, falls back onto the couch in joyful hysterics.

“You been holdin’ out on us?!” exclaims his aunt, Shirley Gray, as Lincoln lets out a belly laugh.

This is a story of a kid who grew up in the same town outside of St. Louis where a white policeman shot and killed a black teenager in 2014; where the street demonstrations of Black Lives Matter first gained national resonance; where Lincoln’s brother, a Walmart employee at the time, risked life and limb the night the store was looted and ransacked.

Ferguson, Missouri — the home of the tragedy of Michael Brown.

And now the home of the triumph of Barrington Lincoln.

“It’s where I’m from, what I know,” Lincoln, Lutheran High School North’s 2018 class president, told The Undefeated on Wednesday morning. “The most depressing thing was seeing the cameras leave after all the demonstrations and coverage. Because the moment that happened, everyone else left and Ferguson went back to what it was. I want to change that. I want to show people from this area you don’t have to be [NBA players] Jayson Tatum or Bradley Beal to find a way out.”

When his mother was pregnant with him, he had been diagnosed with a genetic disorder that would lead to severe growth delays and major intellectual disabilities. He got his name when his parents heard the news and drove through the tony St. Louis suburb of Barrington Downs.

“I wish we could live in a neighborhood like this,” she said. His father replied, “If you can wish for that, wish for our baby to be healthy and normal and able to live a good, prosperous life.”

But the diagnosis was wrong, and Barrington (which means destiny, prosperity and wealth) came into the world without any physical or mental challenges. “Before I was born, society tried to define who I would become,” he writes in his personal “mission statement.”

When he was 15, Barrington’s father, James Lincoln, was diagnosed with leukemia. Barrington donated his bone marrow to his father in March 2015. By August, James had died at 51. “At least I got a couple of more months with him,” he said.

Now? “My goal is to reach back into the community and show the younger generation that they can be successful without relying on the talents of playing anything ending in the suffix ‘-ball.’ ”

“I will go on to attend a world-renowned four-year university.

“I will continue further and graduate from a top-10 business school in the country.

“I will fulfill my destiny to ultimately become the commissioner of the National Basketball Association.”

Like a blue-chip guard confidently telling Steph Curry he will one day break his records, Barrington Lincoln, the pride of Ferguson, Missouri, just put Adam Silver on notice.

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2:32 PMOn Christmas Day, Barrington Lincoln surprised his mother and aunt with personalized T-shirts from Morehouse College.

“You know what this means,” he says in a video of the moment. “I got in.”

The two most influential women in his life were now the mother and aunt of a Morehouse College student. His mom, Lisa McDonald, falls back onto the couch in joyful hysterics.

“You been holdin’ out on us?!” exclaims his aunt, Shirley Gray, as Lincoln lets out a belly laugh.

This is a story of a kid who grew up in the same town outside of St. Louis where a white policeman shot and killed a black teenager in 2014; where the street demonstrations of Black Lives Matter first gained national resonance; where Lincoln’s brother, a Walmart employee at the time, risked life and limb the night the store was looted and ransacked.

Ferguson, Missouri — the home of the tragedy of Michael Brown.

And now the home of the triumph of Barrington Lincoln.

“It’s where I’m from, what I know,” Lincoln, Lutheran High School North’s 2018 class president, told The Undefeated on Wednesday morning. “The most depressing thing was seeing the cameras leave after all the demonstrations and coverage. Because the moment that happened, everyone else left and Ferguson went back to what it was. I want to change that. I want to show people from this area you don’t have to be [NBA players] Jayson Tatum or Bradley Beal to find a way out.”

When his mother was pregnant with him, he had been diagnosed with a genetic disorder that would lead to severe growth delays and major intellectual disabilities. He got his name when his parents heard the news and drove through the tony St. Louis suburb of Barrington Downs.

“I wish we could live in a neighborhood like this,” she said. His father replied, “If you can wish for that, wish for our baby to be healthy and normal and able to live a good, prosperous life.”

But the diagnosis was wrong, and Barrington (which means destiny, prosperity and wealth) came into the world without any physical or mental challenges. “Before I was born, society tried to define who I would become,” he writes in his personal “mission statement.”

When he was 15, Barrington’s father, James Lincoln, was diagnosed with leukemia. Barrington donated his bone marrow to his father in March 2015. By August, James had died at 51. “At least I got a couple of more months with him,” he said.

Now? “My goal is to reach back into the community and show the younger generation that they can be successful without relying on the talents of playing anything ending in the suffix ‘-ball.’ ”

“I will go on to attend a world-renowned four-year university.

“I will continue further and graduate from a top-10 business school in the country.

“I will fulfill my destiny to ultimately become the commissioner of the National Basketball Association.”

Like a blue-chip guard confidently telling Steph Curry he will one day break his records, Barrington Lincoln, the pride of Ferguson, Missouri, just put Adam Silver on notice.

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2:32 PMOn Christmas Day, Barrington Lincoln surprised his mother and aunt with personalized T-shirts from Morehouse College.

“You know what this means,” he says in a video of the moment. “I got in.”

The two most influential women in his life were now the mother and aunt of a Morehouse College student. His mom, Lisa McDonald, falls back onto the couch in joyful hysterics.

“You been holdin’ out on us?!” exclaims his aunt, Shirley Gray, as Lincoln lets out a belly laugh.

This is a story of a kid who grew up in the same town outside of St. Louis where a white policeman shot and killed a black teenager in 2014; where the street demonstrations of Black Lives Matter first gained national resonance; where Lincoln’s brother, a Walmart employee at the time, risked life and limb the night the store was looted and ransacked.

Ferguson, Missouri — the home of the tragedy of Michael Brown.

And now the home of the triumph of Barrington Lincoln.

“It’s where I’m from, what I know,” Lincoln, Lutheran High School North’s 2018 class president, told The Undefeated on Wednesday morning. “The most depressing thing was seeing the cameras leave after all the demonstrations and coverage. Because the moment that happened, everyone else left and Ferguson went back to what it was. I want to change that. I want to show people from this area you don’t have to be [NBA players] Jayson Tatum or Bradley Beal to find a way out.”

When his mother was pregnant with him, he had been diagnosed with a genetic disorder that would lead to severe growth delays and major intellectual disabilities. He got his name when his parents heard the news and drove through the tony St. Louis suburb of Barrington Downs.

“I wish we could live in a neighborhood like this,” she said. His father replied, “If you can wish for that, wish for our baby to be healthy and normal and able to live a good, prosperous life.”

But the diagnosis was wrong, and Barrington (which means destiny, prosperity and wealth) came into the world without any physical or mental challenges. “Before I was born, society tried to define who I would become,” he writes in his personal “mission statement.”

When he was 15, Barrington’s father, James Lincoln, was diagnosed with leukemia. Barrington donated his bone marrow to his father in March 2015. By August, James had died at 51. “At least I got a couple of more months with him,” he said.

Now? “My goal is to reach back into the community and show the younger generation that they can be successful without relying on the talents of playing anything ending in the suffix ‘-ball.’ ”

“I will go on to attend a world-renowned four-year university.

“I will continue further and graduate from a top-10 business school in the country.

“I will fulfill my destiny to ultimately become the commissioner of the National Basketball Association.”

Like a blue-chip guard confidently telling Steph Curry he will one day break his records, Barrington Lincoln, the pride of Ferguson, Missouri, just put Adam Silver on notice.

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2:32 PMOn Christmas Day, Barrington Lincoln surprised his mother and aunt with personalized T-shirts from Morehouse College.

“You know what this means,” he says in a video of the moment. “I got in.”

The two most influential women in his life were now the mother and aunt of a Morehouse College student. His mom, Lisa McDonald, falls back onto the couch in joyful hysterics.

“You been holdin’ out on us?!” exclaims his aunt, Shirley Gray, as Lincoln lets out a belly laugh.

This is a story of a kid who grew up in the same town outside of St. Louis where a white policeman shot and killed a black teenager in 2014; where the street demonstrations of Black Lives Matter first gained national resonance; where Lincoln’s brother, a Walmart employee at the time, risked life and limb the night the store was looted and ransacked.

Ferguson, Missouri — the home of the tragedy of Michael Brown.

And now the home of the triumph of Barrington Lincoln.

“It’s where I’m from, what I know,” Lincoln, Lutheran High School North’s 2018 class president, told The Undefeated on Wednesday morning. “The most depressing thing was seeing the cameras leave after all the demonstrations and coverage. Because the moment that happened, everyone else left and Ferguson went back to what it was. I want to change that. I want to show people from this area you don’t have to be [NBA players] Jayson Tatum or Bradley Beal to find a way out.”

When his mother was pregnant with him, he had been diagnosed with a genetic disorder that would lead to severe growth delays and major intellectual disabilities. He got his name when his parents heard the news and drove through the tony St. Louis suburb of Barrington Downs.

“I wish we could live in a neighborhood like this,” she said. His father replied, “If you can wish for that, wish for our baby to be healthy and normal and able to live a good, prosperous life.”

But the diagnosis was wrong, and Barrington (which means destiny, prosperity and wealth) came into the world without any physical or mental challenges. “Before I was born, society tried to define who I would become,” he writes in his personal “mission statement.”

When he was 15, Barrington’s father, James Lincoln, was diagnosed with leukemia. Barrington donated his bone marrow to his father in March 2015. By August, James had died at 51. “At least I got a couple of more months with him,” he said.

Now? “My goal is to reach back into the community and show the younger generation that they can be successful without relying on the talents of playing anything ending in the suffix ‘-ball.’ ”

“I will go on to attend a world-renowned four-year university.

“I will continue further and graduate from a top-10 business school in the country.

“I will fulfill my destiny to ultimately become the commissioner of the National Basketball Association.”

Like a blue-chip guard confidently telling Steph Curry he will one day break his records, Barrington Lincoln, the pride of Ferguson, Missouri, just put Adam Silver on notice.