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All Day Podcast: 6/22/17

A trip around New York City, with a twist

1:31 PM

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Remember back when I mentioned that the All Day Podcast was going to become a lot more personal? Well, that day has come. This week, I traveled up to New York to talk to a couple of people about their connection to the basketball and sports world, with the NBA draft set to go down Thursday night in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center.

Basically, I grabbed my recording equipment and hit the streets, hoping to capture some stories and give you an idea of what interests me beyond the obvious stick and ball sports that we cover so regularly here. It was a fun ride, and I hope after listening you’ll get a better idea of exactly what makes me tick.

To begin with, I sat down with Porter Braswell and Ryan Williams, the co-creators of Jopwell. It’s a firm that places minority candidates in tech jobs, started by two black men who met while working in finance on Wall Street. I met them at their downtown offices in Manhattan to talk about what prompted them to leave the money world and try to help others in a field that neither of them had much experience in.

Braswell, who played basketball at Yale, talked about what it was like to bring his athletic persona into the corporate world once he was done with hoops and how it helped shape his business strategy. Williams pointed out this was not a popular career decision in his household, but it certainly has paid off at this point in terms of what he’s getting out of it. Then, I got crushed at pingpong.

Later that afternoon, I made my way to midtown to check out the unveiling of Nike’s new REACT technology, featured on the Hyperdunk and Jordan Super.Fly 2017s. The event was held at a place called Terminal 23, which holds invite-only open runs for people in the business and youth players looking for more than the average gym experience. I played horribly, but I did get to talk to three Nike execs who were responsible for creating the new shoes, one of which Golden State Warriors center Draymond Green wore in the NBA Finals. He was there, too.

Lastly, I took a trip to Queens to decompress after hearing the news of the death of Mobb Deep’s Prodigy. He was only 42 years old, making him the latest in a long line of hip-hop greats who have died before 50, which is just really sad. He was a force on the rap scene since “Shook Ones Pt. II,” and his presence in the game as a ’90s artist will never be forgotten.

I talked with K-Sise, a lifelong friend and family member as far as I’m concerned, about what his impact meant to the borough. K is a semiretired recording artist who grew up in Queens, so I thought his input on this subject would be valuable. We sat down at his place and talked about the crazy day that was and how it affected us as fans of the culture, never mind him as a Queens native and New Yorker. I think you’ll find it interesting.

Overall, it was a pretty exhausting Tuesday, but I did my best to make it sound good. With any luck, you’ll get an idea of where this show is looking to go, because although this episode isn’t perfect — none are — it’s as close as I’ve gotten to something that best represents what this blog is really about.

Enjoy.

Mobb Deep’s Prodigy dies at 42

The Queensbridge rapper had long battled sickle cell anemia

1:31 PM

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed

Remember back when I mentioned that the All Day Podcast was going to become a lot more personal? Well, that day has come. This week, I traveled up to New York to talk to a couple of people about their connection to the basketball and sports world, with the NBA draft set to go down Thursday night in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center.

Basically, I grabbed my recording equipment and hit the streets, hoping to capture some stories and give you an idea of what interests me beyond the obvious stick and ball sports that we cover so regularly here. It was a fun ride, and I hope after listening you’ll get a better idea of exactly what makes me tick.

To begin with, I sat down with Porter Braswell and Ryan Williams, the co-creators of Jopwell. It’s a firm that places minority candidates in tech jobs, started by two black men who met while working in finance on Wall Street. I met them at their downtown offices in Manhattan to talk about what prompted them to leave the money world and try to help others in a field that neither of them had much experience in.

Braswell, who played basketball at Yale, talked about what it was like to bring his athletic persona into the corporate world once he was done with hoops and how it helped shape his business strategy. Williams pointed out this was not a popular career decision in his household, but it certainly has paid off at this point in terms of what he’s getting out of it. Then, I got crushed at pingpong.

Later that afternoon, I made my way to midtown to check out the unveiling of Nike’s new REACT technology, featured on the Hyperdunk and Jordan Super.Fly 2017s. The event was held at a place called Terminal 23, which holds invite-only open runs for people in the business and youth players looking for more than the average gym experience. I played horribly, but I did get to talk to three Nike execs who were responsible for creating the new shoes, one of which Golden State Warriors center Draymond Green wore in the NBA Finals. He was there, too.

Lastly, I took a trip to Queens to decompress after hearing the news of the death of Mobb Deep’s Prodigy. He was only 42 years old, making him the latest in a long line of hip-hop greats who have died before 50, which is just really sad. He was a force on the rap scene since “Shook Ones Pt. II,” and his presence in the game as a ’90s artist will never be forgotten.

I talked with K-Sise, a lifelong friend and family member as far as I’m concerned, about what his impact meant to the borough. K is a semiretired recording artist who grew up in Queens, so I thought his input on this subject would be valuable. We sat down at his place and talked about the crazy day that was and how it affected us as fans of the culture, never mind him as a Queens native and New Yorker. I think you’ll find it interesting.

Overall, it was a pretty exhausting Tuesday, but I did my best to make it sound good. With any luck, you’ll get an idea of where this show is looking to go, because although this episode isn’t perfect — none are — it’s as close as I’ve gotten to something that best represents what this blog is really about.

Enjoy.

Daily Dose: 6/20/19

Kamala Harris has the heat for your cookout jam

1:31 PM

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed

Remember back when I mentioned that the All Day Podcast was going to become a lot more personal? Well, that day has come. This week, I traveled up to New York to talk to a couple of people about their connection to the basketball and sports world, with the NBA draft set to go down Thursday night in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center.

Basically, I grabbed my recording equipment and hit the streets, hoping to capture some stories and give you an idea of what interests me beyond the obvious stick and ball sports that we cover so regularly here. It was a fun ride, and I hope after listening you’ll get a better idea of exactly what makes me tick.

To begin with, I sat down with Porter Braswell and Ryan Williams, the co-creators of Jopwell. It’s a firm that places minority candidates in tech jobs, started by two black men who met while working in finance on Wall Street. I met them at their downtown offices in Manhattan to talk about what prompted them to leave the money world and try to help others in a field that neither of them had much experience in.

Braswell, who played basketball at Yale, talked about what it was like to bring his athletic persona into the corporate world once he was done with hoops and how it helped shape his business strategy. Williams pointed out this was not a popular career decision in his household, but it certainly has paid off at this point in terms of what he’s getting out of it. Then, I got crushed at pingpong.

Later that afternoon, I made my way to midtown to check out the unveiling of Nike’s new REACT technology, featured on the Hyperdunk and Jordan Super.Fly 2017s. The event was held at a place called Terminal 23, which holds invite-only open runs for people in the business and youth players looking for more than the average gym experience. I played horribly, but I did get to talk to three Nike execs who were responsible for creating the new shoes, one of which Golden State Warriors center Draymond Green wore in the NBA Finals. He was there, too.

Lastly, I took a trip to Queens to decompress after hearing the news of the death of Mobb Deep’s Prodigy. He was only 42 years old, making him the latest in a long line of hip-hop greats who have died before 50, which is just really sad. He was a force on the rap scene since “Shook Ones Pt. II,” and his presence in the game as a ’90s artist will never be forgotten.

I talked with K-Sise, a lifelong friend and family member as far as I’m concerned, about what his impact meant to the borough. K is a semiretired recording artist who grew up in Queens, so I thought his input on this subject would be valuable. We sat down at his place and talked about the crazy day that was and how it affected us as fans of the culture, never mind him as a Queens native and New Yorker. I think you’ll find it interesting.

Overall, it was a pretty exhausting Tuesday, but I did my best to make it sound good. With any luck, you’ll get an idea of where this show is looking to go, because although this episode isn’t perfect — none are — it’s as close as I’ve gotten to something that best represents what this blog is really about.

Enjoy.

Daily Dose

Daily Dose: 6/19/17

Another black person killed by police, this time in Seattle

1:31 PM

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed

Remember back when I mentioned that the All Day Podcast was going to become a lot more personal? Well, that day has come. This week, I traveled up to New York to talk to a couple of people about their connection to the basketball and sports world, with the NBA draft set to go down Thursday night in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center.

Basically, I grabbed my recording equipment and hit the streets, hoping to capture some stories and give you an idea of what interests me beyond the obvious stick and ball sports that we cover so regularly here. It was a fun ride, and I hope after listening you’ll get a better idea of exactly what makes me tick.

To begin with, I sat down with Porter Braswell and Ryan Williams, the co-creators of Jopwell. It’s a firm that places minority candidates in tech jobs, started by two black men who met while working in finance on Wall Street. I met them at their downtown offices in Manhattan to talk about what prompted them to leave the money world and try to help others in a field that neither of them had much experience in.

Braswell, who played basketball at Yale, talked about what it was like to bring his athletic persona into the corporate world once he was done with hoops and how it helped shape his business strategy. Williams pointed out this was not a popular career decision in his household, but it certainly has paid off at this point in terms of what he’s getting out of it. Then, I got crushed at pingpong.

Later that afternoon, I made my way to midtown to check out the unveiling of Nike’s new REACT technology, featured on the Hyperdunk and Jordan Super.Fly 2017s. The event was held at a place called Terminal 23, which holds invite-only open runs for people in the business and youth players looking for more than the average gym experience. I played horribly, but I did get to talk to three Nike execs who were responsible for creating the new shoes, one of which Golden State Warriors center Draymond Green wore in the NBA Finals. He was there, too.

Lastly, I took a trip to Queens to decompress after hearing the news of the death of Mobb Deep’s Prodigy. He was only 42 years old, making him the latest in a long line of hip-hop greats who have died before 50, which is just really sad. He was a force on the rap scene since “Shook Ones Pt. II,” and his presence in the game as a ’90s artist will never be forgotten.

I talked with K-Sise, a lifelong friend and family member as far as I’m concerned, about what his impact meant to the borough. K is a semiretired recording artist who grew up in Queens, so I thought his input on this subject would be valuable. We sat down at his place and talked about the crazy day that was and how it affected us as fans of the culture, never mind him as a Queens native and New Yorker. I think you’ll find it interesting.

Overall, it was a pretty exhausting Tuesday, but I did my best to make it sound good. With any luck, you’ll get an idea of where this show is looking to go, because although this episode isn’t perfect — none are — it’s as close as I’ve gotten to something that best represents what this blog is really about.

Enjoy.

The Morning Roast: 6/19/17

Father’s Day edition, with Mina Kimes in D.C.!

1:31 PM

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed

Remember back when I mentioned that the All Day Podcast was going to become a lot more personal? Well, that day has come. This week, I traveled up to New York to talk to a couple of people about their connection to the basketball and sports world, with the NBA draft set to go down Thursday night in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center.

Basically, I grabbed my recording equipment and hit the streets, hoping to capture some stories and give you an idea of what interests me beyond the obvious stick and ball sports that we cover so regularly here. It was a fun ride, and I hope after listening you’ll get a better idea of exactly what makes me tick.

To begin with, I sat down with Porter Braswell and Ryan Williams, the co-creators of Jopwell. It’s a firm that places minority candidates in tech jobs, started by two black men who met while working in finance on Wall Street. I met them at their downtown offices in Manhattan to talk about what prompted them to leave the money world and try to help others in a field that neither of them had much experience in.

Braswell, who played basketball at Yale, talked about what it was like to bring his athletic persona into the corporate world once he was done with hoops and how it helped shape his business strategy. Williams pointed out this was not a popular career decision in his household, but it certainly has paid off at this point in terms of what he’s getting out of it. Then, I got crushed at pingpong.

Later that afternoon, I made my way to midtown to check out the unveiling of Nike’s new REACT technology, featured on the Hyperdunk and Jordan Super.Fly 2017s. The event was held at a place called Terminal 23, which holds invite-only open runs for people in the business and youth players looking for more than the average gym experience. I played horribly, but I did get to talk to three Nike execs who were responsible for creating the new shoes, one of which Golden State Warriors center Draymond Green wore in the NBA Finals. He was there, too.

Lastly, I took a trip to Queens to decompress after hearing the news of the death of Mobb Deep’s Prodigy. He was only 42 years old, making him the latest in a long line of hip-hop greats who have died before 50, which is just really sad. He was a force on the rap scene since “Shook Ones Pt. II,” and his presence in the game as a ’90s artist will never be forgotten.

I talked with K-Sise, a lifelong friend and family member as far as I’m concerned, about what his impact meant to the borough. K is a semiretired recording artist who grew up in Queens, so I thought his input on this subject would be valuable. We sat down at his place and talked about the crazy day that was and how it affected us as fans of the culture, never mind him as a Queens native and New Yorker. I think you’ll find it interesting.

Overall, it was a pretty exhausting Tuesday, but I did my best to make it sound good. With any luck, you’ll get an idea of where this show is looking to go, because although this episode isn’t perfect — none are — it’s as close as I’ve gotten to something that best represents what this blog is really about.

Enjoy.

Bill Cosby’s sexual assault mistrial was as much about power as it was about rape

Cosby’s silence speaks of his wholesale betrayal

1:31 PM

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed

Remember back when I mentioned that the All Day Podcast was going to become a lot more personal? Well, that day has come. This week, I traveled up to New York to talk to a couple of people about their connection to the basketball and sports world, with the NBA draft set to go down Thursday night in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center.

Basically, I grabbed my recording equipment and hit the streets, hoping to capture some stories and give you an idea of what interests me beyond the obvious stick and ball sports that we cover so regularly here. It was a fun ride, and I hope after listening you’ll get a better idea of exactly what makes me tick.

To begin with, I sat down with Porter Braswell and Ryan Williams, the co-creators of Jopwell. It’s a firm that places minority candidates in tech jobs, started by two black men who met while working in finance on Wall Street. I met them at their downtown offices in Manhattan to talk about what prompted them to leave the money world and try to help others in a field that neither of them had much experience in.

Braswell, who played basketball at Yale, talked about what it was like to bring his athletic persona into the corporate world once he was done with hoops and how it helped shape his business strategy. Williams pointed out this was not a popular career decision in his household, but it certainly has paid off at this point in terms of what he’s getting out of it. Then, I got crushed at pingpong.

Later that afternoon, I made my way to midtown to check out the unveiling of Nike’s new REACT technology, featured on the Hyperdunk and Jordan Super.Fly 2017s. The event was held at a place called Terminal 23, which holds invite-only open runs for people in the business and youth players looking for more than the average gym experience. I played horribly, but I did get to talk to three Nike execs who were responsible for creating the new shoes, one of which Golden State Warriors center Draymond Green wore in the NBA Finals. He was there, too.

Lastly, I took a trip to Queens to decompress after hearing the news of the death of Mobb Deep’s Prodigy. He was only 42 years old, making him the latest in a long line of hip-hop greats who have died before 50, which is just really sad. He was a force on the rap scene since “Shook Ones Pt. II,” and his presence in the game as a ’90s artist will never be forgotten.

I talked with K-Sise, a lifelong friend and family member as far as I’m concerned, about what his impact meant to the borough. K is a semiretired recording artist who grew up in Queens, so I thought his input on this subject would be valuable. We sat down at his place and talked about the crazy day that was and how it affected us as fans of the culture, never mind him as a Queens native and New Yorker. I think you’ll find it interesting.

Overall, it was a pretty exhausting Tuesday, but I did my best to make it sound good. With any luck, you’ll get an idea of where this show is looking to go, because although this episode isn’t perfect — none are — it’s as close as I’ve gotten to something that best represents what this blog is really about.

Enjoy.

Daily Dose: 6/16/17

Two black officers honored at Congressional Baseball Game

1:31 PM

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed

Remember back when I mentioned that the All Day Podcast was going to become a lot more personal? Well, that day has come. This week, I traveled up to New York to talk to a couple of people about their connection to the basketball and sports world, with the NBA draft set to go down Thursday night in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center.

Basically, I grabbed my recording equipment and hit the streets, hoping to capture some stories and give you an idea of what interests me beyond the obvious stick and ball sports that we cover so regularly here. It was a fun ride, and I hope after listening you’ll get a better idea of exactly what makes me tick.

To begin with, I sat down with Porter Braswell and Ryan Williams, the co-creators of Jopwell. It’s a firm that places minority candidates in tech jobs, started by two black men who met while working in finance on Wall Street. I met them at their downtown offices in Manhattan to talk about what prompted them to leave the money world and try to help others in a field that neither of them had much experience in.

Braswell, who played basketball at Yale, talked about what it was like to bring his athletic persona into the corporate world once he was done with hoops and how it helped shape his business strategy. Williams pointed out this was not a popular career decision in his household, but it certainly has paid off at this point in terms of what he’s getting out of it. Then, I got crushed at pingpong.

Later that afternoon, I made my way to midtown to check out the unveiling of Nike’s new REACT technology, featured on the Hyperdunk and Jordan Super.Fly 2017s. The event was held at a place called Terminal 23, which holds invite-only open runs for people in the business and youth players looking for more than the average gym experience. I played horribly, but I did get to talk to three Nike execs who were responsible for creating the new shoes, one of which Golden State Warriors center Draymond Green wore in the NBA Finals. He was there, too.

Lastly, I took a trip to Queens to decompress after hearing the news of the death of Mobb Deep’s Prodigy. He was only 42 years old, making him the latest in a long line of hip-hop greats who have died before 50, which is just really sad. He was a force on the rap scene since “Shook Ones Pt. II,” and his presence in the game as a ’90s artist will never be forgotten.

I talked with K-Sise, a lifelong friend and family member as far as I’m concerned, about what his impact meant to the borough. K is a semiretired recording artist who grew up in Queens, so I thought his input on this subject would be valuable. We sat down at his place and talked about the crazy day that was and how it affected us as fans of the culture, never mind him as a Queens native and New Yorker. I think you’ll find it interesting.

Overall, it was a pretty exhausting Tuesday, but I did my best to make it sound good. With any luck, you’ll get an idea of where this show is looking to go, because although this episode isn’t perfect — none are — it’s as close as I’ve gotten to something that best represents what this blog is really about.

Enjoy.