What Had Happened Was Trending stories on the intersections of race, sports & culture

All Day Podcast: 9/21/17

Long drive golfing, plus Kobe and the rap game

10:03 AM

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On the show I sat down with Troy Mullins and Maurice Allen, who are World Long Drive Champions, and both are black. If you’re not familiar with the sport, it’s basically an offshoot of golf that involves the driving range. Think of it as competitive Top Golf. The conversation ranged from what it’s like being black in the golf world to how they see the sport growing in the coming years.

The two have fascinating backgrounds. Mullins was an athlete at Cornell University before she decided she might want to get into U.S. diplomatic work. Allen was also a former college athlete who took up golf, basically as something to keep him occupied when he wasn’t pursuing his career as a chiropractor. They’re both extremely interesting people, golf aside.

To finish the pod, I did a story from Los Angeles with a group of guys known as “Signature Tracks.” You might know their work from some of the music production they’ve done with reality television. Those sounds you hear on Keeping Up With The Kardashians and The Real Housewives series don’t just make themselves. It was a fun look into the world of music from a different angle than usual.

Perhaps most interesting about them, though, is their connection to Kobe Bryant. Having worked with him on his rap album, they had the scoop on exactly why it never came out, as well as an interesting anecdote on exactly how he went about his business when it came to the rap game. The answer might not surprise you, but is remarkable to hear.

Enjoy!

Daily Dose: 9/19/17

Chris Long to donate six game checks to Charlottesville, Virginia, students

10:03 AM

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed

On the show I sat down with Troy Mullins and Maurice Allen, who are World Long Drive Champions, and both are black. If you’re not familiar with the sport, it’s basically an offshoot of golf that involves the driving range. Think of it as competitive Top Golf. The conversation ranged from what it’s like being black in the golf world to how they see the sport growing in the coming years.

The two have fascinating backgrounds. Mullins was an athlete at Cornell University before she decided she might want to get into U.S. diplomatic work. Allen was also a former college athlete who took up golf, basically as something to keep him occupied when he wasn’t pursuing his career as a chiropractor. They’re both extremely interesting people, golf aside.

To finish the pod, I did a story from Los Angeles with a group of guys known as “Signature Tracks.” You might know their work from some of the music production they’ve done with reality television. Those sounds you hear on Keeping Up With The Kardashians and The Real Housewives series don’t just make themselves. It was a fun look into the world of music from a different angle than usual.

Perhaps most interesting about them, though, is their connection to Kobe Bryant. Having worked with him on his rap album, they had the scoop on exactly why it never came out, as well as an interesting anecdote on exactly how he went about his business when it came to the rap game. The answer might not surprise you, but is remarkable to hear.

Enjoy!

Daily Dose: 9/18/17

Marshawn Lynch making all the right moves

10:03 AM

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed

On the show I sat down with Troy Mullins and Maurice Allen, who are World Long Drive Champions, and both are black. If you’re not familiar with the sport, it’s basically an offshoot of golf that involves the driving range. Think of it as competitive Top Golf. The conversation ranged from what it’s like being black in the golf world to how they see the sport growing in the coming years.

The two have fascinating backgrounds. Mullins was an athlete at Cornell University before she decided she might want to get into U.S. diplomatic work. Allen was also a former college athlete who took up golf, basically as something to keep him occupied when he wasn’t pursuing his career as a chiropractor. They’re both extremely interesting people, golf aside.

To finish the pod, I did a story from Los Angeles with a group of guys known as “Signature Tracks.” You might know their work from some of the music production they’ve done with reality television. Those sounds you hear on Keeping Up With The Kardashians and The Real Housewives series don’t just make themselves. It was a fun look into the world of music from a different angle than usual.

Perhaps most interesting about them, though, is their connection to Kobe Bryant. Having worked with him on his rap album, they had the scoop on exactly why it never came out, as well as an interesting anecdote on exactly how he went about his business when it came to the rap game. The answer might not surprise you, but is remarkable to hear.

Enjoy!

Daily Dose

Daily Dose: 9/15/17

Conspiracy theories about Kenneka Jenkins’ death were nonsense

1:51 PMWhat up, gang? I’m on my way to Los Angeles for the weekend and very happy about that. On Thursday, I joined the Around The Horn squad again, which is getting to be really fun. I’ll be on SportsNation at 3:30 p.m. EST on Friday.

https://twitter.com/emkayanders/status/908480852337807360

Well, things are getting awkward around here with the White House. Ever since the situation with Jemele Hill unfolded, there have been opinions all over the shop about what should happen regarding her job status and, in general, this network’s stance on President Donald Trump. Now, Trump himself is back to yelling on the internet via Twitter, this time saying that ESPN should apologize for what happened. For what it’s worth, here’s what former anchor Dan Patrick had to say about the matter.

When it comes to crimes committed, people love blaming black folks. There’s a reasonably long history of people either entirely fabricating crimes that we allegedly committed or doing something to themselves and claiming it was a black person’s doing. The latest incident of the like happened in Minneapolis, where a campus security officer shot himself, then made up a story about a gunman because he was afraid he might get in trouble. Well, that’s exactly what happened. He got fired.

The internet failed Kenneka Jenkins. The 19-year-old Chicago teen was found dead in a walk-in freezer last week after a party at a hotel, and almost immediately Twitter sleuths created a theory that Jenkins was sexually assaulted and murdered and her body was deposited in the freezer. There were Facebook Live videos that purportedly showed the assault of the teen reflected in another woman’s sunglasses and Jenkins being heard yelping, “Help me” in the background. Amateur doxxers posted the home addresses and phone numbers of multiple men who were allegedly at the hotel that night and were possibly involved. Jenkins’ friends allegedly set her up. The police allegedly didn’t care enough about black girls to properly investigate — which is not out of the realm of possibility. A #JusticeForKenneka hashtag was created well before a police investigation was complete or a medical examiner could rule on a cause of death or evidence of sexual assault. And in the end, on Thursday, Chicago activist Andrew Holmes said video from the Crowne Plaza Chicago O’Hare Hotel shows Jenkins, possibly inebriated, walking into the freezer by herself, the door closing behind her.

The Indianapolis Colts continue to play themselves. On Friday morning, NFL.com reported that the Colts plan to start second-year quarterback Jacoby Brissett this week against the Arizona Cardinals. Not only was Brissett acquired just 13 days ago from the New England Patriots, where he was the team’s third-stringer, but he has just two career starts, throwing for 308 yards and no touchdowns. The Colts have known since January that they may be without starter Andrew Luck (shoulder surgery). But they rolled with Scott Tolzien, a mediocre quarterback at best. This is not to say the team *had* to sign Colin Kaepernick, but if they were going to start a quarterback whose main weakness is accuracy (Kaepernick’s 59.8 career completion percentage vs. Brissett’s 62.1) and strengths are “strong arm” and “fast feet” and would need minimal time to prepare, why take an untested backup over a former Super Bowl starter? Remember, this is all about “football reasons.”