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Analytics and black people

Do numbers ever lie?

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Freddie Gray case

Justice system produces familiar results

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Rihanna stole the show at Prince’s tribute

Everything else about it got dragged

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Daily Dose: 5/23/16

Draymond Green involved in low blow

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

No Flex Zone

Unless you’re having fun at the YMCA

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Turn your canvas

to figure out what’s going on with these carpets

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Wild Style

Except not really, it just sort of looks like the movie

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Wall bangers

More people should do this

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Gary Rogers

is the most talented person on YouTube

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Daniel Espinoza

managed to show up after a long night

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Los Angeles highways

are apparently littered with skaters trying the #FreewayChallenge

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Nas’ latest movie

is a tale of Cleveland skaters trying to make it

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Christian McCaffrey

feels sting of stereotypes as white football player

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Our History

Mob violence

changed the course of Memphis’ history

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

NBA

Figure it out, Kyle

the game and series aren’t over

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

You know you’re getting older when …

you realize Fresh Prince’s final episode was 20 years ago

The Undefeated

3:33 PM

Accept it. You’re old. Twenty years ago today, Hillary and Ashley were moving to New York. Carlton was moving east as well to start school at his father’s alma mater, Princeton. Uncle Phil, Aunt Viv and Nicky headed east to be closer to the rest of the family. Geoffrey, everyone’s favorite butler, gladly accepted his one-way ticket back to London.

But Will was still unsure what direction his life was headed in.

If anyone’s been living under a rock the past quarter century and doesn’t recognize the names, Friday marked the 20-year anniversary of the series finale of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. Debates have raged for years about the two Aunt Vivs, the best episode or funniest character, but it’s impossible to deny the show’s legacy and staying power.

For what it’s worth, too, Will figured out life pretty quickly after everyone moved out. Less than two months later, he stumbled upon an acting gig in some movie called Independence Day. Sources say it performed marginally decent at the box office.

Michael Brown

your life changed the game

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Prince

Magic Johnson

told an incredible Prince story on Jimmy Kimmel Live!

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Daily Dose: 5/20/16

Serena isn’t stopping any time soon

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Barry Bonds

is not here for teenagers rapping the N-word

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

RGIII claps back

with tweets that say he still doesn’t care

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Ezra Edelman

to discuss O.J.: Made in America 30 for 30 film

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Lil Yachty is living his best life

as a model for a new fashion line collaboration

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Draymond Green

has a new Beats ad and it’s all Oakland

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.

Daily Dose: 5/19/16

Cam Newton is riding custom clean

2:17 PMThis morning, First Take discussed Michael Wilbon’s column titled “Mission Impossible: African-Americans & analytics.” In it, he argues that black basketball players and coaches are being ostracized surrounding not just the belief in, but the society around the metrics movement.

Hosts Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless also addressed the backlash the piece received, with Smith confirming what Wilbon said and then explaining how black coaches are “becoming an endangered species” and “in a world of trouble.”

“That’s the language that the owners love to hear,” Smith said. “Who do you hire? You hire guys that speak that language; who you’ve ingratiated yourself with them and vice versa; who gravitate to you and vice versa; and who you hang out with and drink together and talk about all of these things, and it’s never us. And then suddenly you’re outside, looking in. And at the rate it’s going, don’t be surprised if in a league where there are 30 teams, and obviously, 30 head coaches, if 10 percent or less of them happen to be black. Black coaches, head coaches are becoming an endangered species. They are in a world of trouble.”

When the Wilbon’s story initially went up, reaction was swift.

“I just think analytics are rarely discussed for large swathes of casual sports fans everywhere,” @mistertoastman wrote. “By loose definition a casual fan is less experienced with the nuances of a sport. How could they be expected to analyze its statistics? I don’t think I agree that there is a correlation between black people and emotion that biases us against analytics. I’ve gone to barbershops and talked basketball, and for sure, there was no mention of win shares or VORP. Is that unique to black experience ?”

https://twitter.com/RocketIntellect/status/735148000683532293

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that’s funny.


This last reaction is perhaps most important. In his April 2014 story “Blacks losing the numbers game,” Howard Bryant explained how the mentality applies to baseball.

“On its face, data mining is obviously not a racist practice, but as [Oakland A’s general manager Billy] Beane and I discussed a decade and a half ago, the unintended consequences of a changing world have produced stalls in progress for African-Americans,” Bryant wrote. “As analytics became more prolific in baseball front offices, so have the criteria to be hired. The hiring universe, the game of who gets the jobs, has been changing for more than a decade. … The days of ex-players — black, white or Latino — becoming general managers seem to be coming to an end, a reign of opportunity that was never exactly plentiful.”

That, you can count on.

Rhiannon Walker, associate editor, contributed to this report.