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Baron Davis compares playing for Donald Sterling to being in ‘Get Out’

Ex-Clippers guard talks about disgraced former owner and more on podcast

5:11 PMDisgraced former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling made his players feel like they were playing out a scene from Jordan Peele’s highly acclaimed movie Get Out. Well, at least according to former Clippers guard Baron Davis.

On Thursday, Davis spoke on ESPN’s The Hoop Collective podcast about what it was like playing for Sterling, when he knew Sterling was racist and how he handled working in that environment.

Now, if you follow the Golden Globe Awards and know nothing else about the film, you might think it is some sort of funny movie because it’s in the comedy category. Wrong, the movie is about racism, the subtle and overt kind, which brings us back to Sterling, who made racist remarks caught on audiotape, was banned from the league, fined $2.5 million and forced to sell the team.

Below is Davis’ comparison of the vanquished owner to the popular film and more.

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS

Baron Davis on Donald Sterling and playing for the Clippers:

For me, I say this — and I said this a million times — the day at my press conference when I walked up the stage, the head of communications said, ‘Hey, you know, he may say some things to you. Just ignore him.’ And I said, ‘Well, what kind of stuff he gonna say?’ He was like, ‘Man, the dude could say anything. He just don’t have a real good understanding of people or what he says. He’s loopy.’ I said, ‘Man, he better be careful what he say to me, because I ain’t like the rest of them m—–f—–s.’ And I walked off and I didn’t think nothing to it until I was like, ‘Yo. Uh-oh. This dude is racist. I can’t play for no racist.’ You know what I mean? I can’t play for no racist, man.

When did you realize Sterling is racist?

Yeah, when I start paying attention to like … it was like, you know … you’re in the city and it’s like, ‘Oh, my God!’ and everybody’s excited. And it was almost like … it was almost like the movie Get Out. It was like you walking in training camp, dude, and everybody was like, ‘Yo, what the f— you so happy for?’ And I was like, ‘S—, we about to play a season.’ And it’s like, ‘Nah, he comin’.’

And when he came in, he just sittin’ there, I saw at that moment he had no respect for nobody. You know? He had no respect for nobody. He couldn’t look nobody in the eye. And everything he was saying to people was like stuff you never say to somebody on their first day at the job. And so, for me, he rubbed me wrong from the jump because I ain’t like it. And the way that the whole Clippers system was set up … it was set up to protect him. Protect him from the media. Protect him from us, from saying stuff to us. And so it’s like he at fault, but everybody else at fault, too. You know, [former president of the Clippers] Andy Roeser, fo’ sho. [Former general manager] Mike Dunleavy, for sure. You know what I mean?

What was the wildest thing you ever heard Sterling say?

Besides the fact of him calling me a bastard and a heathen and a m—–f—– and telling me, ‘F— you! Why are [you] shooting? You shouldn’t be shooting in a f—ing blowout?’ Um, I say … I say the worst thing he probably did was when we lost a game and he came in the locker room. And he walked in the locker room and looked at me. He looked at everybody in the locker, and he went down the row, one by one, and he cussed everybody out. And he picked on Al Thornton, who was a rookie from Georgia. Who didn’t really know what was going on because Mike Dunleavy was puttin’ him out there to just tryna score. You know what I mean? And he dogged Al Thornton cold. And so that’s what I was like, ‘Hold on, dude. This dude ain’t right.’ Like, he don’t even know this kid … he just a kid.

And then he went around the room and tried to talk about everybody. But that s— was fallin’ on deaf ears.

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5:11 PMDisgraced former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling made his players feel like they were playing out a scene from Jordan Peele’s highly acclaimed movie Get Out. Well, at least according to former Clippers guard Baron Davis.

On Thursday, Davis spoke on ESPN’s The Hoop Collective podcast about what it was like playing for Sterling, when he knew Sterling was racist and how he handled working in that environment.

Now, if you follow the Golden Globe Awards and know nothing else about the film, you might think it is some sort of funny movie because it’s in the comedy category. Wrong, the movie is about racism, the subtle and overt kind, which brings us back to Sterling, who made racist remarks caught on audiotape, was banned from the league, fined $2.5 million and forced to sell the team.

Below is Davis’ comparison of the vanquished owner to the popular film and more.

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS

Baron Davis on Donald Sterling and playing for the Clippers:

For me, I say this — and I said this a million times — the day at my press conference when I walked up the stage, the head of communications said, ‘Hey, you know, he may say some things to you. Just ignore him.’ And I said, ‘Well, what kind of stuff he gonna say?’ He was like, ‘Man, the dude could say anything. He just don’t have a real good understanding of people or what he says. He’s loopy.’ I said, ‘Man, he better be careful what he say to me, because I ain’t like the rest of them m—–f—–s.’ And I walked off and I didn’t think nothing to it until I was like, ‘Yo. Uh-oh. This dude is racist. I can’t play for no racist.’ You know what I mean? I can’t play for no racist, man.

When did you realize Sterling is racist?

Yeah, when I start paying attention to like … it was like, you know … you’re in the city and it’s like, ‘Oh, my God!’ and everybody’s excited. And it was almost like … it was almost like the movie Get Out. It was like you walking in training camp, dude, and everybody was like, ‘Yo, what the f— you so happy for?’ And I was like, ‘S—, we about to play a season.’ And it’s like, ‘Nah, he comin’.’

And when he came in, he just sittin’ there, I saw at that moment he had no respect for nobody. You know? He had no respect for nobody. He couldn’t look nobody in the eye. And everything he was saying to people was like stuff you never say to somebody on their first day at the job. And so, for me, he rubbed me wrong from the jump because I ain’t like it. And the way that the whole Clippers system was set up … it was set up to protect him. Protect him from the media. Protect him from us, from saying stuff to us. And so it’s like he at fault, but everybody else at fault, too. You know, [former president of the Clippers] Andy Roeser, fo’ sho. [Former general manager] Mike Dunleavy, for sure. You know what I mean?

What was the wildest thing you ever heard Sterling say?

Besides the fact of him calling me a bastard and a heathen and a m—–f—– and telling me, ‘F— you! Why are [you] shooting? You shouldn’t be shooting in a f—ing blowout?’ Um, I say … I say the worst thing he probably did was when we lost a game and he came in the locker room. And he walked in the locker room and looked at me. He looked at everybody in the locker, and he went down the row, one by one, and he cussed everybody out. And he picked on Al Thornton, who was a rookie from Georgia. Who didn’t really know what was going on because Mike Dunleavy was puttin’ him out there to just tryna score. You know what I mean? And he dogged Al Thornton cold. And so that’s what I was like, ‘Hold on, dude. This dude ain’t right.’ Like, he don’t even know this kid … he just a kid.

And then he went around the room and tried to talk about everybody. But that s— was fallin’ on deaf ears.

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5:11 PMDisgraced former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling made his players feel like they were playing out a scene from Jordan Peele’s highly acclaimed movie Get Out. Well, at least according to former Clippers guard Baron Davis.

On Thursday, Davis spoke on ESPN’s The Hoop Collective podcast about what it was like playing for Sterling, when he knew Sterling was racist and how he handled working in that environment.

Now, if you follow the Golden Globe Awards and know nothing else about the film, you might think it is some sort of funny movie because it’s in the comedy category. Wrong, the movie is about racism, the subtle and overt kind, which brings us back to Sterling, who made racist remarks caught on audiotape, was banned from the league, fined $2.5 million and forced to sell the team.

Below is Davis’ comparison of the vanquished owner to the popular film and more.

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS

Baron Davis on Donald Sterling and playing for the Clippers:

For me, I say this — and I said this a million times — the day at my press conference when I walked up the stage, the head of communications said, ‘Hey, you know, he may say some things to you. Just ignore him.’ And I said, ‘Well, what kind of stuff he gonna say?’ He was like, ‘Man, the dude could say anything. He just don’t have a real good understanding of people or what he says. He’s loopy.’ I said, ‘Man, he better be careful what he say to me, because I ain’t like the rest of them m—–f—–s.’ And I walked off and I didn’t think nothing to it until I was like, ‘Yo. Uh-oh. This dude is racist. I can’t play for no racist.’ You know what I mean? I can’t play for no racist, man.

When did you realize Sterling is racist?

Yeah, when I start paying attention to like … it was like, you know … you’re in the city and it’s like, ‘Oh, my God!’ and everybody’s excited. And it was almost like … it was almost like the movie Get Out. It was like you walking in training camp, dude, and everybody was like, ‘Yo, what the f— you so happy for?’ And I was like, ‘S—, we about to play a season.’ And it’s like, ‘Nah, he comin’.’

And when he came in, he just sittin’ there, I saw at that moment he had no respect for nobody. You know? He had no respect for nobody. He couldn’t look nobody in the eye. And everything he was saying to people was like stuff you never say to somebody on their first day at the job. And so, for me, he rubbed me wrong from the jump because I ain’t like it. And the way that the whole Clippers system was set up … it was set up to protect him. Protect him from the media. Protect him from us, from saying stuff to us. And so it’s like he at fault, but everybody else at fault, too. You know, [former president of the Clippers] Andy Roeser, fo’ sho. [Former general manager] Mike Dunleavy, for sure. You know what I mean?

What was the wildest thing you ever heard Sterling say?

Besides the fact of him calling me a bastard and a heathen and a m—–f—– and telling me, ‘F— you! Why are [you] shooting? You shouldn’t be shooting in a f—ing blowout?’ Um, I say … I say the worst thing he probably did was when we lost a game and he came in the locker room. And he walked in the locker room and looked at me. He looked at everybody in the locker, and he went down the row, one by one, and he cussed everybody out. And he picked on Al Thornton, who was a rookie from Georgia. Who didn’t really know what was going on because Mike Dunleavy was puttin’ him out there to just tryna score. You know what I mean? And he dogged Al Thornton cold. And so that’s what I was like, ‘Hold on, dude. This dude ain’t right.’ Like, he don’t even know this kid … he just a kid.

And then he went around the room and tried to talk about everybody. But that s— was fallin’ on deaf ears.

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5:11 PMDisgraced former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling made his players feel like they were playing out a scene from Jordan Peele’s highly acclaimed movie Get Out. Well, at least according to former Clippers guard Baron Davis.

On Thursday, Davis spoke on ESPN’s The Hoop Collective podcast about what it was like playing for Sterling, when he knew Sterling was racist and how he handled working in that environment.

Now, if you follow the Golden Globe Awards and know nothing else about the film, you might think it is some sort of funny movie because it’s in the comedy category. Wrong, the movie is about racism, the subtle and overt kind, which brings us back to Sterling, who made racist remarks caught on audiotape, was banned from the league, fined $2.5 million and forced to sell the team.

Below is Davis’ comparison of the vanquished owner to the popular film and more.

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS

Baron Davis on Donald Sterling and playing for the Clippers:

For me, I say this — and I said this a million times — the day at my press conference when I walked up the stage, the head of communications said, ‘Hey, you know, he may say some things to you. Just ignore him.’ And I said, ‘Well, what kind of stuff he gonna say?’ He was like, ‘Man, the dude could say anything. He just don’t have a real good understanding of people or what he says. He’s loopy.’ I said, ‘Man, he better be careful what he say to me, because I ain’t like the rest of them m—–f—–s.’ And I walked off and I didn’t think nothing to it until I was like, ‘Yo. Uh-oh. This dude is racist. I can’t play for no racist.’ You know what I mean? I can’t play for no racist, man.

When did you realize Sterling is racist?

Yeah, when I start paying attention to like … it was like, you know … you’re in the city and it’s like, ‘Oh, my God!’ and everybody’s excited. And it was almost like … it was almost like the movie Get Out. It was like you walking in training camp, dude, and everybody was like, ‘Yo, what the f— you so happy for?’ And I was like, ‘S—, we about to play a season.’ And it’s like, ‘Nah, he comin’.’

And when he came in, he just sittin’ there, I saw at that moment he had no respect for nobody. You know? He had no respect for nobody. He couldn’t look nobody in the eye. And everything he was saying to people was like stuff you never say to somebody on their first day at the job. And so, for me, he rubbed me wrong from the jump because I ain’t like it. And the way that the whole Clippers system was set up … it was set up to protect him. Protect him from the media. Protect him from us, from saying stuff to us. And so it’s like he at fault, but everybody else at fault, too. You know, [former president of the Clippers] Andy Roeser, fo’ sho. [Former general manager] Mike Dunleavy, for sure. You know what I mean?

What was the wildest thing you ever heard Sterling say?

Besides the fact of him calling me a bastard and a heathen and a m—–f—– and telling me, ‘F— you! Why are [you] shooting? You shouldn’t be shooting in a f—ing blowout?’ Um, I say … I say the worst thing he probably did was when we lost a game and he came in the locker room. And he walked in the locker room and looked at me. He looked at everybody in the locker, and he went down the row, one by one, and he cussed everybody out. And he picked on Al Thornton, who was a rookie from Georgia. Who didn’t really know what was going on because Mike Dunleavy was puttin’ him out there to just tryna score. You know what I mean? And he dogged Al Thornton cold. And so that’s what I was like, ‘Hold on, dude. This dude ain’t right.’ Like, he don’t even know this kid … he just a kid.

And then he went around the room and tried to talk about everybody. But that s— was fallin’ on deaf ears.

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5:11 PMDisgraced former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling made his players feel like they were playing out a scene from Jordan Peele’s highly acclaimed movie Get Out. Well, at least according to former Clippers guard Baron Davis.

On Thursday, Davis spoke on ESPN’s The Hoop Collective podcast about what it was like playing for Sterling, when he knew Sterling was racist and how he handled working in that environment.

Now, if you follow the Golden Globe Awards and know nothing else about the film, you might think it is some sort of funny movie because it’s in the comedy category. Wrong, the movie is about racism, the subtle and overt kind, which brings us back to Sterling, who made racist remarks caught on audiotape, was banned from the league, fined $2.5 million and forced to sell the team.

Below is Davis’ comparison of the vanquished owner to the popular film and more.

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS

Baron Davis on Donald Sterling and playing for the Clippers:

For me, I say this — and I said this a million times — the day at my press conference when I walked up the stage, the head of communications said, ‘Hey, you know, he may say some things to you. Just ignore him.’ And I said, ‘Well, what kind of stuff he gonna say?’ He was like, ‘Man, the dude could say anything. He just don’t have a real good understanding of people or what he says. He’s loopy.’ I said, ‘Man, he better be careful what he say to me, because I ain’t like the rest of them m—–f—–s.’ And I walked off and I didn’t think nothing to it until I was like, ‘Yo. Uh-oh. This dude is racist. I can’t play for no racist.’ You know what I mean? I can’t play for no racist, man.

When did you realize Sterling is racist?

Yeah, when I start paying attention to like … it was like, you know … you’re in the city and it’s like, ‘Oh, my God!’ and everybody’s excited. And it was almost like … it was almost like the movie Get Out. It was like you walking in training camp, dude, and everybody was like, ‘Yo, what the f— you so happy for?’ And I was like, ‘S—, we about to play a season.’ And it’s like, ‘Nah, he comin’.’

And when he came in, he just sittin’ there, I saw at that moment he had no respect for nobody. You know? He had no respect for nobody. He couldn’t look nobody in the eye. And everything he was saying to people was like stuff you never say to somebody on their first day at the job. And so, for me, he rubbed me wrong from the jump because I ain’t like it. And the way that the whole Clippers system was set up … it was set up to protect him. Protect him from the media. Protect him from us, from saying stuff to us. And so it’s like he at fault, but everybody else at fault, too. You know, [former president of the Clippers] Andy Roeser, fo’ sho. [Former general manager] Mike Dunleavy, for sure. You know what I mean?

What was the wildest thing you ever heard Sterling say?

Besides the fact of him calling me a bastard and a heathen and a m—–f—– and telling me, ‘F— you! Why are [you] shooting? You shouldn’t be shooting in a f—ing blowout?’ Um, I say … I say the worst thing he probably did was when we lost a game and he came in the locker room. And he walked in the locker room and looked at me. He looked at everybody in the locker, and he went down the row, one by one, and he cussed everybody out. And he picked on Al Thornton, who was a rookie from Georgia. Who didn’t really know what was going on because Mike Dunleavy was puttin’ him out there to just tryna score. You know what I mean? And he dogged Al Thornton cold. And so that’s what I was like, ‘Hold on, dude. This dude ain’t right.’ Like, he don’t even know this kid … he just a kid.

And then he went around the room and tried to talk about everybody. But that s— was fallin’ on deaf ears.

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5:11 PMDisgraced former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling made his players feel like they were playing out a scene from Jordan Peele’s highly acclaimed movie Get Out. Well, at least according to former Clippers guard Baron Davis.

On Thursday, Davis spoke on ESPN’s The Hoop Collective podcast about what it was like playing for Sterling, when he knew Sterling was racist and how he handled working in that environment.

Now, if you follow the Golden Globe Awards and know nothing else about the film, you might think it is some sort of funny movie because it’s in the comedy category. Wrong, the movie is about racism, the subtle and overt kind, which brings us back to Sterling, who made racist remarks caught on audiotape, was banned from the league, fined $2.5 million and forced to sell the team.

Below is Davis’ comparison of the vanquished owner to the popular film and more.

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS

Baron Davis on Donald Sterling and playing for the Clippers:

For me, I say this — and I said this a million times — the day at my press conference when I walked up the stage, the head of communications said, ‘Hey, you know, he may say some things to you. Just ignore him.’ And I said, ‘Well, what kind of stuff he gonna say?’ He was like, ‘Man, the dude could say anything. He just don’t have a real good understanding of people or what he says. He’s loopy.’ I said, ‘Man, he better be careful what he say to me, because I ain’t like the rest of them m—–f—–s.’ And I walked off and I didn’t think nothing to it until I was like, ‘Yo. Uh-oh. This dude is racist. I can’t play for no racist.’ You know what I mean? I can’t play for no racist, man.

When did you realize Sterling is racist?

Yeah, when I start paying attention to like … it was like, you know … you’re in the city and it’s like, ‘Oh, my God!’ and everybody’s excited. And it was almost like … it was almost like the movie Get Out. It was like you walking in training camp, dude, and everybody was like, ‘Yo, what the f— you so happy for?’ And I was like, ‘S—, we about to play a season.’ And it’s like, ‘Nah, he comin’.’

And when he came in, he just sittin’ there, I saw at that moment he had no respect for nobody. You know? He had no respect for nobody. He couldn’t look nobody in the eye. And everything he was saying to people was like stuff you never say to somebody on their first day at the job. And so, for me, he rubbed me wrong from the jump because I ain’t like it. And the way that the whole Clippers system was set up … it was set up to protect him. Protect him from the media. Protect him from us, from saying stuff to us. And so it’s like he at fault, but everybody else at fault, too. You know, [former president of the Clippers] Andy Roeser, fo’ sho. [Former general manager] Mike Dunleavy, for sure. You know what I mean?

What was the wildest thing you ever heard Sterling say?

Besides the fact of him calling me a bastard and a heathen and a m—–f—– and telling me, ‘F— you! Why are [you] shooting? You shouldn’t be shooting in a f—ing blowout?’ Um, I say … I say the worst thing he probably did was when we lost a game and he came in the locker room. And he walked in the locker room and looked at me. He looked at everybody in the locker, and he went down the row, one by one, and he cussed everybody out. And he picked on Al Thornton, who was a rookie from Georgia. Who didn’t really know what was going on because Mike Dunleavy was puttin’ him out there to just tryna score. You know what I mean? And he dogged Al Thornton cold. And so that’s what I was like, ‘Hold on, dude. This dude ain’t right.’ Like, he don’t even know this kid … he just a kid.

And then he went around the room and tried to talk about everybody. But that s— was fallin’ on deaf ears.

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5:11 PMDisgraced former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling made his players feel like they were playing out a scene from Jordan Peele’s highly acclaimed movie Get Out. Well, at least according to former Clippers guard Baron Davis.

On Thursday, Davis spoke on ESPN’s The Hoop Collective podcast about what it was like playing for Sterling, when he knew Sterling was racist and how he handled working in that environment.

Now, if you follow the Golden Globe Awards and know nothing else about the film, you might think it is some sort of funny movie because it’s in the comedy category. Wrong, the movie is about racism, the subtle and overt kind, which brings us back to Sterling, who made racist remarks caught on audiotape, was banned from the league, fined $2.5 million and forced to sell the team.

Below is Davis’ comparison of the vanquished owner to the popular film and more.

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS

Baron Davis on Donald Sterling and playing for the Clippers:

For me, I say this — and I said this a million times — the day at my press conference when I walked up the stage, the head of communications said, ‘Hey, you know, he may say some things to you. Just ignore him.’ And I said, ‘Well, what kind of stuff he gonna say?’ He was like, ‘Man, the dude could say anything. He just don’t have a real good understanding of people or what he says. He’s loopy.’ I said, ‘Man, he better be careful what he say to me, because I ain’t like the rest of them m—–f—–s.’ And I walked off and I didn’t think nothing to it until I was like, ‘Yo. Uh-oh. This dude is racist. I can’t play for no racist.’ You know what I mean? I can’t play for no racist, man.

When did you realize Sterling is racist?

Yeah, when I start paying attention to like … it was like, you know … you’re in the city and it’s like, ‘Oh, my God!’ and everybody’s excited. And it was almost like … it was almost like the movie Get Out. It was like you walking in training camp, dude, and everybody was like, ‘Yo, what the f— you so happy for?’ And I was like, ‘S—, we about to play a season.’ And it’s like, ‘Nah, he comin’.’

And when he came in, he just sittin’ there, I saw at that moment he had no respect for nobody. You know? He had no respect for nobody. He couldn’t look nobody in the eye. And everything he was saying to people was like stuff you never say to somebody on their first day at the job. And so, for me, he rubbed me wrong from the jump because I ain’t like it. And the way that the whole Clippers system was set up … it was set up to protect him. Protect him from the media. Protect him from us, from saying stuff to us. And so it’s like he at fault, but everybody else at fault, too. You know, [former president of the Clippers] Andy Roeser, fo’ sho. [Former general manager] Mike Dunleavy, for sure. You know what I mean?

What was the wildest thing you ever heard Sterling say?

Besides the fact of him calling me a bastard and a heathen and a m—–f—– and telling me, ‘F— you! Why are [you] shooting? You shouldn’t be shooting in a f—ing blowout?’ Um, I say … I say the worst thing he probably did was when we lost a game and he came in the locker room. And he walked in the locker room and looked at me. He looked at everybody in the locker, and he went down the row, one by one, and he cussed everybody out. And he picked on Al Thornton, who was a rookie from Georgia. Who didn’t really know what was going on because Mike Dunleavy was puttin’ him out there to just tryna score. You know what I mean? And he dogged Al Thornton cold. And so that’s what I was like, ‘Hold on, dude. This dude ain’t right.’ Like, he don’t even know this kid … he just a kid.

And then he went around the room and tried to talk about everybody. But that s— was fallin’ on deaf ears.