What Had Happened Was Trending stories on the intersections of race, sports & culture

‘Black Panther’ magazine covers are missing black photographers

Why that matters and 11 who should be considered

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Five things to know about ‘SI’ cover model Danielle Herrington

Add her name to the list of Compton, California’s finest

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Chris Rock’s first Netflix comedy special arrives sooner than you think

The wait is over!

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Slam dunk: LeBron James to produce reboot of the classic ‘House Party’

‘Atlanta’ screenwriters Stephen Glover and Jamal Olori will write

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Kehinde Wiley, Amy Sherald are the first black artists to paint first black presidential portraits

Black-on-black art: Former first couple humbled by their stunning new portraits

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Celtics’ Jaylen Brown to host ‘Tech Hustle’ during All-Star Weekend

Private event will include people from sports, business and entertainment

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Bowie State QB Amir Hall named Black College Football Player of the Year

He was honored as part of the Black College Hall of Fame induction ceremonies

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

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Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Wake up! It’s the 30th anniversary of Spike Lee’s ‘School Daze’

In this #BlackLivesMatter era, the ’80s film is still very relevant

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Three takeaways from Serena Williams’ return

She’s still the top draw in women’s tennis

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

What offseason? Jo Adell goes back to school

Outfielder wants to work in media after he’s done playing

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

New York Fashion Week: At Telfar and Pyer Moss, messages in the music

Two designers find different paths to hope in troubled times

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Richard Ewell: the first black skater to win a national title in singles and pairs

Famed coach Mabel Fairbanks helped launch another career

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems

G L Askew II

Jabari Jacobs

View this post on Instagram

🌴😎✨ @plies for @atlanticrecords

A post shared by Jabari Jacobs (@jabarijacobs) on

Shaniqwa Jarvis

Atoy Wilson: the first black skater to win a national title

His first coach was Mabel Fairbanks

1:01 PMThe decision by Essence to publish three different covers in honor of the release of Black Panther took the internet by storm over the past 24 hours. That means five major magazines — Time, Essence, Variety, Allure and British GQ — have published cover stories on the highly anticipated film in the past few days. And all five elected not to use a black photographer to handle the representation of the all-black starring cast of Black Panther. Instead, five white men, one white woman and one Asian woman were tasked with creating the pictures, which have immediately gone viral, especially on Black Twitter. (Kwaku Alston did shoot a Black Panther cover for Entertainment Weekly last fall.)

From the Time cover shot of Chadwick Boseman, along with the supplementary photo of him and director Ryan Coogler, which were photographed by the duo Williams+Hirakawa to the Essence covers, which were all photographed by Dennis Leupold, one wonders whether anyone took a hint from Barack and Michelle Obama. The first African-American president and first lady had their images immortalized in the halls of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery by African-American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, the first African-American artists to create presidential portraits for the gallery. In the case of the Obamas, the message behind who created the picture can be just as powerful as who is in them.

Unfortunately, this is far from the first time that magazines have missed an opportunity to make a statement with who they hire to shoot their covers. When Colin Kaepernick graced the cover of GQ magazine in December with photos inside echoing the famous photos of Muhammad Ali shot by African-American Howard Bingham, the work was done by Martin Schoeller, a white man. When you look at three of the largest magazines that write about and reflect African-American culture — Essence, Ebony and GQ — you see the lack of African-American photographers is nothing new. In 2017, between the three magazines, just 4.25 covers were made by a black photographer, and three of them were done by the same person. (The .25 comes about because a photographer shot one photo in a series for a cover image.)

At The Undefeated, we are here to throw you some options of amazing black photographers who could have been the Kehinde to Barack when it came to making a cover image for Black Panther.

Kwaku Alston

Wayne Lawrence

View this post on Instagram

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to photograph these sensational beauties, @ajak_deng @aamito_lagum @mari_agory @nykhor @nurhellman for a piece entitled Red Hook Poetic Justice to be published in L'OFFICIEL magazine's special Africana extravaganza issue, coming to newsstands Aug. 24th. My brother @lejenke, it was an honor and a gift to collaborate with you and your team on this, my first fashion editorial. Hopefully it's the first of many. Big up to everyone who had a hand in making this happen, to @daleknows, @joimperio for the assist and to @souhi_ and @robertmeffordhair for adding some of your flavor to the pot. @lofficielparis @jedroot #blackbeauty #melanin #loveisthemessage #fashion #art #onlocation #staytuned #waynelawrence

A post shared by Wayne Lawrence (@waynelawrence) on

Marcus Smith

Itaysha Jordan

Jeffery Salter

View this post on Instagram

This week I will be sharing some of my fine art work in a series called Sublime explorations. The brilliant and talented actor @shein___ who appears in the Black Lightning television series gave me just the right of amount of quiet intensity. I appreciate the collaboration and her patience on what turned out to be a very long night. The images were inspired by a simple gold framed renaissance still life painting of some apples and a stainless steel antique teapot that was hanging on a wall in a tiny and dark cafe in the city of Old San Juan. I kept staring at the painting done by some long deceased artist, while enjoying a plate of mofongo on a red checker tablecloth with my friend Herminio Rodriguez. This was many years ago, hopefully after the horrific hurricane Maria pounded, that little restaurant survived the storm, has electrical power and that surreal painting is still up. Thanks to: Make-up Artist: @mcmakeup Crew: @beality @alishawasnthere location: @yeelengallery and creative support @monsterparty Retouch by Warren Mantooth @wdig805 Photographed with: @phaseonephoto

A post shared by Jeffery Salter (@jefferysalter) on

Andre D. Wagner

View this post on Instagram

@mahershalaali for @nytimes & @jolieruben

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on

Kareem Black

Carrie Mae Weems