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Can a ‘White Men Can’t Jump’ remake succeed?

Blake Griffin’s production company looks to take it on

4:00 PMFull disclosure: Legendary sports filmmaker Ron Shelton’s White Men Can’t Jump is my favorite basketball movie of all time, and it’s not even close. When it was released, I had just turned 11 years old. Somehow, I managed to see it in the theater. As a result, it will always be a kid’s movie in my mind.

So, when Variety reported that Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin, Carolina Panthers offensive lineman Ryan Kalil and Black-ish creator Kenya Barris planned to remake the buddy sports comedy, needless to say, it was good news. But then one thing occurred to me: This is going to be extremely difficult.

One Sheet movie poster advertises 'White Men Can't Jump' (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell, and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, California, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

One-sheet movie poster advertises ‘White Men Can’t Jump’ (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kish/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images

When it comes to all the remakes, reboots and faraway sequels that we’ve seen in the past five years, almost none have touched a nearly sacrosanct genre: the 1990s sports kids movie. (Space Jam is the exception that makes that rule, which we’ll get to later.) The list is pretty solid. In baseball flicks alone, you’ve got a handful that are tremendous. The Mighty Ducks franchise was smart enough to immediately triple down. Others just didn’t necessarily lend themselves to further editions, because they were historically anchored: Rudy, A League of Their Own and Cool Runnings, for example. Big Green, Little Giants and Ladybugs didn’t create the merchandising or cultural footprint to garner a second look. Toss in a few straight-to-DVD sequels, and there’s really nothing else.

For White Men Can’t Jump, the bar for a remake is particularly high for two reasons. No. 1, it was rated R. Forget about sports movies, anything that wants to be a blockbuster these days barely gets above the PG-13 rating before its released. And once you move down to that level, you’re stripping away the most relevant cultural contribution the movie made to the world: trash-talking.

Personally, as a middle schooler, seeing the interaction between Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson changed my entire world view as to what the fun part of sports was. The idea of everyday brothers just destroying people psychologically with their vocal game wasn’t new to me, I’d just never seen it in such explicit detail on film. More importantly, it was hilarious. From that day on, that was how I played everything. Loudly.

The second reason is obvious: the major premise. It just doesn’t work the same way anymore. The very concept of white guys not being able to dunk just doesn’t hold the same water it once did. Never mind winning NBA Dunk titles, while there’s still a reasonable stigma against white Americans specifically in a lot of basketball circles, at the highest level, getting crammed on by a nonblack person is old hat.

On a basic level, the storyline is just less believable because of basic basketball evolution. We’re not talking once-in-a-lifetime Tom Chambers-type stuff. These days, you can get banged on a by a white dude every night in the league if you’re not paying attention. For lack of a better term, in many ways, the novelty has been lost. But that certainly doesn’t mean that this movie can’t be great.

The question comes in whether this serves as a true remake, or effectively a generational sequel. The latter is probably the better idea, considering. What White Men Can’t Jump also added to the landscape was a plethora of cultural touchstones beyond basketball that were incredible. The flags of Ghana and the Sudan became household images. Caps on the court were suddenly more acceptable. We all should know what a quince is by now. Some of you might be able to hear Jimi Hendrix at this point. In retrospect, basketball was a backdrop for just an otherwise funny movie about what life in Southern California was like in the early ’90s.

But that’s also where it could shine. If Blake Griffin can find a way to maybe draw on his mixed race heritage and create a more modern storyline surrounding what it’s probably like to live in both worlds as a hoopster, then you’ve got a smartly updated plot that likely reflects something more along the lines of what we’re looking at in the world today. Griffin had just turned 3 years old when the original film was released, for what it’s worth. More of this and we’ll be good. 👇👇👇

To be clear, this isn’t some “keep your hands off my childhood memories” manifesto. Not remotely. This particular project has a higher degree of difficulty than most. Snipes and Harrelson weren’t unknowns when they made the original. It was actually the second sports movie they made together (Wildcats). Anyway, the reason why Space Jam works is because it was a movie that came out of the gate as a blockbuster. There were toys, clothes, a soundtrack to die for and everything else that a megamovie is supposed to have. Remaking it was just a matter of time.

“That movie [White Men Can’t Jump] changed [things]. Commercials went from Nike, slo-mo, special effects stuff, to the street,” Shelton said on The Nerdist podcast earlier this month. “From South Africa to Australia, I’ve received letters ever since. It changed the way kids on the street dressed. I’m proud of that.”

Recreating the magic of the OG version should not be the goal here. But using it as a springboard for another hilarious tale won’t be an easy task. Either way, we’re still going to Sizzler after we see it.

Barack Obama holds final news conference

He keeps it classy, cool and wishes Donald Trump good luck

4:00 PMFull disclosure: Legendary sports filmmaker Ron Shelton’s White Men Can’t Jump is my favorite basketball movie of all time, and it’s not even close. When it was released, I had just turned 11 years old. Somehow, I managed to see it in the theater. As a result, it will always be a kid’s movie in my mind.

So, when Variety reported that Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin, Carolina Panthers offensive lineman Ryan Kalil and Black-ish creator Kenya Barris planned to remake the buddy sports comedy, needless to say, it was good news. But then one thing occurred to me: This is going to be extremely difficult.

One Sheet movie poster advertises 'White Men Can't Jump' (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell, and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, California, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

One-sheet movie poster advertises ‘White Men Can’t Jump’ (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kish/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images

When it comes to all the remakes, reboots and faraway sequels that we’ve seen in the past five years, almost none have touched a nearly sacrosanct genre: the 1990s sports kids movie. (Space Jam is the exception that makes that rule, which we’ll get to later.) The list is pretty solid. In baseball flicks alone, you’ve got a handful that are tremendous. The Mighty Ducks franchise was smart enough to immediately triple down. Others just didn’t necessarily lend themselves to further editions, because they were historically anchored: Rudy, A League of Their Own and Cool Runnings, for example. Big Green, Little Giants and Ladybugs didn’t create the merchandising or cultural footprint to garner a second look. Toss in a few straight-to-DVD sequels, and there’s really nothing else.

For White Men Can’t Jump, the bar for a remake is particularly high for two reasons. No. 1, it was rated R. Forget about sports movies, anything that wants to be a blockbuster these days barely gets above the PG-13 rating before its released. And once you move down to that level, you’re stripping away the most relevant cultural contribution the movie made to the world: trash-talking.

Personally, as a middle schooler, seeing the interaction between Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson changed my entire world view as to what the fun part of sports was. The idea of everyday brothers just destroying people psychologically with their vocal game wasn’t new to me, I’d just never seen it in such explicit detail on film. More importantly, it was hilarious. From that day on, that was how I played everything. Loudly.

The second reason is obvious: the major premise. It just doesn’t work the same way anymore. The very concept of white guys not being able to dunk just doesn’t hold the same water it once did. Never mind winning NBA Dunk titles, while there’s still a reasonable stigma against white Americans specifically in a lot of basketball circles, at the highest level, getting crammed on by a nonblack person is old hat.

On a basic level, the storyline is just less believable because of basic basketball evolution. We’re not talking once-in-a-lifetime Tom Chambers-type stuff. These days, you can get banged on a by a white dude every night in the league if you’re not paying attention. For lack of a better term, in many ways, the novelty has been lost. But that certainly doesn’t mean that this movie can’t be great.

The question comes in whether this serves as a true remake, or effectively a generational sequel. The latter is probably the better idea, considering. What White Men Can’t Jump also added to the landscape was a plethora of cultural touchstones beyond basketball that were incredible. The flags of Ghana and the Sudan became household images. Caps on the court were suddenly more acceptable. We all should know what a quince is by now. Some of you might be able to hear Jimi Hendrix at this point. In retrospect, basketball was a backdrop for just an otherwise funny movie about what life in Southern California was like in the early ’90s.

But that’s also where it could shine. If Blake Griffin can find a way to maybe draw on his mixed race heritage and create a more modern storyline surrounding what it’s probably like to live in both worlds as a hoopster, then you’ve got a smartly updated plot that likely reflects something more along the lines of what we’re looking at in the world today. Griffin had just turned 3 years old when the original film was released, for what it’s worth. More of this and we’ll be good. 👇👇👇

To be clear, this isn’t some “keep your hands off my childhood memories” manifesto. Not remotely. This particular project has a higher degree of difficulty than most. Snipes and Harrelson weren’t unknowns when they made the original. It was actually the second sports movie they made together (Wildcats). Anyway, the reason why Space Jam works is because it was a movie that came out of the gate as a blockbuster. There were toys, clothes, a soundtrack to die for and everything else that a megamovie is supposed to have. Remaking it was just a matter of time.

“That movie [White Men Can’t Jump] changed [things]. Commercials went from Nike, slo-mo, special effects stuff, to the street,” Shelton said on The Nerdist podcast earlier this month. “From South Africa to Australia, I’ve received letters ever since. It changed the way kids on the street dressed. I’m proud of that.”

Recreating the magic of the OG version should not be the goal here. But using it as a springboard for another hilarious tale won’t be an easy task. Either way, we’re still going to Sizzler after we see it.

Mike Tyson drops video for Soulja Boy diss track

The world definitely did not need this

4:00 PMFull disclosure: Legendary sports filmmaker Ron Shelton’s White Men Can’t Jump is my favorite basketball movie of all time, and it’s not even close. When it was released, I had just turned 11 years old. Somehow, I managed to see it in the theater. As a result, it will always be a kid’s movie in my mind.

So, when Variety reported that Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin, Carolina Panthers offensive lineman Ryan Kalil and Black-ish creator Kenya Barris planned to remake the buddy sports comedy, needless to say, it was good news. But then one thing occurred to me: This is going to be extremely difficult.

One Sheet movie poster advertises 'White Men Can't Jump' (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell, and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, California, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

One-sheet movie poster advertises ‘White Men Can’t Jump’ (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kish/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images

When it comes to all the remakes, reboots and faraway sequels that we’ve seen in the past five years, almost none have touched a nearly sacrosanct genre: the 1990s sports kids movie. (Space Jam is the exception that makes that rule, which we’ll get to later.) The list is pretty solid. In baseball flicks alone, you’ve got a handful that are tremendous. The Mighty Ducks franchise was smart enough to immediately triple down. Others just didn’t necessarily lend themselves to further editions, because they were historically anchored: Rudy, A League of Their Own and Cool Runnings, for example. Big Green, Little Giants and Ladybugs didn’t create the merchandising or cultural footprint to garner a second look. Toss in a few straight-to-DVD sequels, and there’s really nothing else.

For White Men Can’t Jump, the bar for a remake is particularly high for two reasons. No. 1, it was rated R. Forget about sports movies, anything that wants to be a blockbuster these days barely gets above the PG-13 rating before its released. And once you move down to that level, you’re stripping away the most relevant cultural contribution the movie made to the world: trash-talking.

Personally, as a middle schooler, seeing the interaction between Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson changed my entire world view as to what the fun part of sports was. The idea of everyday brothers just destroying people psychologically with their vocal game wasn’t new to me, I’d just never seen it in such explicit detail on film. More importantly, it was hilarious. From that day on, that was how I played everything. Loudly.

The second reason is obvious: the major premise. It just doesn’t work the same way anymore. The very concept of white guys not being able to dunk just doesn’t hold the same water it once did. Never mind winning NBA Dunk titles, while there’s still a reasonable stigma against white Americans specifically in a lot of basketball circles, at the highest level, getting crammed on by a nonblack person is old hat.

On a basic level, the storyline is just less believable because of basic basketball evolution. We’re not talking once-in-a-lifetime Tom Chambers-type stuff. These days, you can get banged on a by a white dude every night in the league if you’re not paying attention. For lack of a better term, in many ways, the novelty has been lost. But that certainly doesn’t mean that this movie can’t be great.

The question comes in whether this serves as a true remake, or effectively a generational sequel. The latter is probably the better idea, considering. What White Men Can’t Jump also added to the landscape was a plethora of cultural touchstones beyond basketball that were incredible. The flags of Ghana and the Sudan became household images. Caps on the court were suddenly more acceptable. We all should know what a quince is by now. Some of you might be able to hear Jimi Hendrix at this point. In retrospect, basketball was a backdrop for just an otherwise funny movie about what life in Southern California was like in the early ’90s.

But that’s also where it could shine. If Blake Griffin can find a way to maybe draw on his mixed race heritage and create a more modern storyline surrounding what it’s probably like to live in both worlds as a hoopster, then you’ve got a smartly updated plot that likely reflects something more along the lines of what we’re looking at in the world today. Griffin had just turned 3 years old when the original film was released, for what it’s worth. More of this and we’ll be good. 👇👇👇

To be clear, this isn’t some “keep your hands off my childhood memories” manifesto. Not remotely. This particular project has a higher degree of difficulty than most. Snipes and Harrelson weren’t unknowns when they made the original. It was actually the second sports movie they made together (Wildcats). Anyway, the reason why Space Jam works is because it was a movie that came out of the gate as a blockbuster. There were toys, clothes, a soundtrack to die for and everything else that a megamovie is supposed to have. Remaking it was just a matter of time.

“That movie [White Men Can’t Jump] changed [things]. Commercials went from Nike, slo-mo, special effects stuff, to the street,” Shelton said on The Nerdist podcast earlier this month. “From South Africa to Australia, I’ve received letters ever since. It changed the way kids on the street dressed. I’m proud of that.”

Recreating the magic of the OG version should not be the goal here. But using it as a springboard for another hilarious tale won’t be an easy task. Either way, we’re still going to Sizzler after we see it.

Daily Dose: 1/18/17

D.C. gets ready for inauguration

4:00 PMFull disclosure: Legendary sports filmmaker Ron Shelton’s White Men Can’t Jump is my favorite basketball movie of all time, and it’s not even close. When it was released, I had just turned 11 years old. Somehow, I managed to see it in the theater. As a result, it will always be a kid’s movie in my mind.

So, when Variety reported that Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin, Carolina Panthers offensive lineman Ryan Kalil and Black-ish creator Kenya Barris planned to remake the buddy sports comedy, needless to say, it was good news. But then one thing occurred to me: This is going to be extremely difficult.

One Sheet movie poster advertises 'White Men Can't Jump' (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell, and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, California, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

One-sheet movie poster advertises ‘White Men Can’t Jump’ (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kish/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images

When it comes to all the remakes, reboots and faraway sequels that we’ve seen in the past five years, almost none have touched a nearly sacrosanct genre: the 1990s sports kids movie. (Space Jam is the exception that makes that rule, which we’ll get to later.) The list is pretty solid. In baseball flicks alone, you’ve got a handful that are tremendous. The Mighty Ducks franchise was smart enough to immediately triple down. Others just didn’t necessarily lend themselves to further editions, because they were historically anchored: Rudy, A League of Their Own and Cool Runnings, for example. Big Green, Little Giants and Ladybugs didn’t create the merchandising or cultural footprint to garner a second look. Toss in a few straight-to-DVD sequels, and there’s really nothing else.

For White Men Can’t Jump, the bar for a remake is particularly high for two reasons. No. 1, it was rated R. Forget about sports movies, anything that wants to be a blockbuster these days barely gets above the PG-13 rating before its released. And once you move down to that level, you’re stripping away the most relevant cultural contribution the movie made to the world: trash-talking.

Personally, as a middle schooler, seeing the interaction between Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson changed my entire world view as to what the fun part of sports was. The idea of everyday brothers just destroying people psychologically with their vocal game wasn’t new to me, I’d just never seen it in such explicit detail on film. More importantly, it was hilarious. From that day on, that was how I played everything. Loudly.

The second reason is obvious: the major premise. It just doesn’t work the same way anymore. The very concept of white guys not being able to dunk just doesn’t hold the same water it once did. Never mind winning NBA Dunk titles, while there’s still a reasonable stigma against white Americans specifically in a lot of basketball circles, at the highest level, getting crammed on by a nonblack person is old hat.

On a basic level, the storyline is just less believable because of basic basketball evolution. We’re not talking once-in-a-lifetime Tom Chambers-type stuff. These days, you can get banged on a by a white dude every night in the league if you’re not paying attention. For lack of a better term, in many ways, the novelty has been lost. But that certainly doesn’t mean that this movie can’t be great.

The question comes in whether this serves as a true remake, or effectively a generational sequel. The latter is probably the better idea, considering. What White Men Can’t Jump also added to the landscape was a plethora of cultural touchstones beyond basketball that were incredible. The flags of Ghana and the Sudan became household images. Caps on the court were suddenly more acceptable. We all should know what a quince is by now. Some of you might be able to hear Jimi Hendrix at this point. In retrospect, basketball was a backdrop for just an otherwise funny movie about what life in Southern California was like in the early ’90s.

But that’s also where it could shine. If Blake Griffin can find a way to maybe draw on his mixed race heritage and create a more modern storyline surrounding what it’s probably like to live in both worlds as a hoopster, then you’ve got a smartly updated plot that likely reflects something more along the lines of what we’re looking at in the world today. Griffin had just turned 3 years old when the original film was released, for what it’s worth. More of this and we’ll be good. 👇👇👇

To be clear, this isn’t some “keep your hands off my childhood memories” manifesto. Not remotely. This particular project has a higher degree of difficulty than most. Snipes and Harrelson weren’t unknowns when they made the original. It was actually the second sports movie they made together (Wildcats). Anyway, the reason why Space Jam works is because it was a movie that came out of the gate as a blockbuster. There were toys, clothes, a soundtrack to die for and everything else that a megamovie is supposed to have. Remaking it was just a matter of time.

“That movie [White Men Can’t Jump] changed [things]. Commercials went from Nike, slo-mo, special effects stuff, to the street,” Shelton said on The Nerdist podcast earlier this month. “From South Africa to Australia, I’ve received letters ever since. It changed the way kids on the street dressed. I’m proud of that.”

Recreating the magic of the OG version should not be the goal here. But using it as a springboard for another hilarious tale won’t be an easy task. Either way, we’re still going to Sizzler after we see it.

Daily Dose: 1/17/17

Serena Williams is back in the land down under

4:00 PMFull disclosure: Legendary sports filmmaker Ron Shelton’s White Men Can’t Jump is my favorite basketball movie of all time, and it’s not even close. When it was released, I had just turned 11 years old. Somehow, I managed to see it in the theater. As a result, it will always be a kid’s movie in my mind.

So, when Variety reported that Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin, Carolina Panthers offensive lineman Ryan Kalil and Black-ish creator Kenya Barris planned to remake the buddy sports comedy, needless to say, it was good news. But then one thing occurred to me: This is going to be extremely difficult.

One Sheet movie poster advertises 'White Men Can't Jump' (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell, and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, California, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

One-sheet movie poster advertises ‘White Men Can’t Jump’ (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kish/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images

When it comes to all the remakes, reboots and faraway sequels that we’ve seen in the past five years, almost none have touched a nearly sacrosanct genre: the 1990s sports kids movie. (Space Jam is the exception that makes that rule, which we’ll get to later.) The list is pretty solid. In baseball flicks alone, you’ve got a handful that are tremendous. The Mighty Ducks franchise was smart enough to immediately triple down. Others just didn’t necessarily lend themselves to further editions, because they were historically anchored: Rudy, A League of Their Own and Cool Runnings, for example. Big Green, Little Giants and Ladybugs didn’t create the merchandising or cultural footprint to garner a second look. Toss in a few straight-to-DVD sequels, and there’s really nothing else.

For White Men Can’t Jump, the bar for a remake is particularly high for two reasons. No. 1, it was rated R. Forget about sports movies, anything that wants to be a blockbuster these days barely gets above the PG-13 rating before its released. And once you move down to that level, you’re stripping away the most relevant cultural contribution the movie made to the world: trash-talking.

Personally, as a middle schooler, seeing the interaction between Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson changed my entire world view as to what the fun part of sports was. The idea of everyday brothers just destroying people psychologically with their vocal game wasn’t new to me, I’d just never seen it in such explicit detail on film. More importantly, it was hilarious. From that day on, that was how I played everything. Loudly.

The second reason is obvious: the major premise. It just doesn’t work the same way anymore. The very concept of white guys not being able to dunk just doesn’t hold the same water it once did. Never mind winning NBA Dunk titles, while there’s still a reasonable stigma against white Americans specifically in a lot of basketball circles, at the highest level, getting crammed on by a nonblack person is old hat.

On a basic level, the storyline is just less believable because of basic basketball evolution. We’re not talking once-in-a-lifetime Tom Chambers-type stuff. These days, you can get banged on a by a white dude every night in the league if you’re not paying attention. For lack of a better term, in many ways, the novelty has been lost. But that certainly doesn’t mean that this movie can’t be great.

The question comes in whether this serves as a true remake, or effectively a generational sequel. The latter is probably the better idea, considering. What White Men Can’t Jump also added to the landscape was a plethora of cultural touchstones beyond basketball that were incredible. The flags of Ghana and the Sudan became household images. Caps on the court were suddenly more acceptable. We all should know what a quince is by now. Some of you might be able to hear Jimi Hendrix at this point. In retrospect, basketball was a backdrop for just an otherwise funny movie about what life in Southern California was like in the early ’90s.

But that’s also where it could shine. If Blake Griffin can find a way to maybe draw on his mixed race heritage and create a more modern storyline surrounding what it’s probably like to live in both worlds as a hoopster, then you’ve got a smartly updated plot that likely reflects something more along the lines of what we’re looking at in the world today. Griffin had just turned 3 years old when the original film was released, for what it’s worth. More of this and we’ll be good. 👇👇👇

To be clear, this isn’t some “keep your hands off my childhood memories” manifesto. Not remotely. This particular project has a higher degree of difficulty than most. Snipes and Harrelson weren’t unknowns when they made the original. It was actually the second sports movie they made together (Wildcats). Anyway, the reason why Space Jam works is because it was a movie that came out of the gate as a blockbuster. There were toys, clothes, a soundtrack to die for and everything else that a megamovie is supposed to have. Remaking it was just a matter of time.

“That movie [White Men Can’t Jump] changed [things]. Commercials went from Nike, slo-mo, special effects stuff, to the street,” Shelton said on The Nerdist podcast earlier this month. “From South Africa to Australia, I’ve received letters ever since. It changed the way kids on the street dressed. I’m proud of that.”

Recreating the magic of the OG version should not be the goal here. But using it as a springboard for another hilarious tale won’t be an easy task. Either way, we’re still going to Sizzler after we see it.

Daily Dose: 1/16/17

Bishop Eddie Long dies at 63

4:00 PMFull disclosure: Legendary sports filmmaker Ron Shelton’s White Men Can’t Jump is my favorite basketball movie of all time, and it’s not even close. When it was released, I had just turned 11 years old. Somehow, I managed to see it in the theater. As a result, it will always be a kid’s movie in my mind.

So, when Variety reported that Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin, Carolina Panthers offensive lineman Ryan Kalil and Black-ish creator Kenya Barris planned to remake the buddy sports comedy, needless to say, it was good news. But then one thing occurred to me: This is going to be extremely difficult.

One Sheet movie poster advertises 'White Men Can't Jump' (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell, and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, California, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

One-sheet movie poster advertises ‘White Men Can’t Jump’ (20th Century Fox), a basketball sports comedy starring Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Tyra Ferrell and Rosie Perez, Los Angeles, 1992. (Photo by John D. Kish/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)

John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images

When it comes to all the remakes, reboots and faraway sequels that we’ve seen in the past five years, almost none have touched a nearly sacrosanct genre: the 1990s sports kids movie. (Space Jam is the exception that makes that rule, which we’ll get to later.) The list is pretty solid. In baseball flicks alone, you’ve got a handful that are tremendous. The Mighty Ducks franchise was smart enough to immediately triple down. Others just didn’t necessarily lend themselves to further editions, because they were historically anchored: Rudy, A League of Their Own and Cool Runnings, for example. Big Green, Little Giants and Ladybugs didn’t create the merchandising or cultural footprint to garner a second look. Toss in a few straight-to-DVD sequels, and there’s really nothing else.

For White Men Can’t Jump, the bar for a remake is particularly high for two reasons. No. 1, it was rated R. Forget about sports movies, anything that wants to be a blockbuster these days barely gets above the PG-13 rating before its released. And once you move down to that level, you’re stripping away the most relevant cultural contribution the movie made to the world: trash-talking.

Personally, as a middle schooler, seeing the interaction between Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson changed my entire world view as to what the fun part of sports was. The idea of everyday brothers just destroying people psychologically with their vocal game wasn’t new to me, I’d just never seen it in such explicit detail on film. More importantly, it was hilarious. From that day on, that was how I played everything. Loudly.

The second reason is obvious: the major premise. It just doesn’t work the same way anymore. The very concept of white guys not being able to dunk just doesn’t hold the same water it once did. Never mind winning NBA Dunk titles, while there’s still a reasonable stigma against white Americans specifically in a lot of basketball circles, at the highest level, getting crammed on by a nonblack person is old hat.

On a basic level, the storyline is just less believable because of basic basketball evolution. We’re not talking once-in-a-lifetime Tom Chambers-type stuff. These days, you can get banged on a by a white dude every night in the league if you’re not paying attention. For lack of a better term, in many ways, the novelty has been lost. But that certainly doesn’t mean that this movie can’t be great.

The question comes in whether this serves as a true remake, or effectively a generational sequel. The latter is probably the better idea, considering. What White Men Can’t Jump also added to the landscape was a plethora of cultural touchstones beyond basketball that were incredible. The flags of Ghana and the Sudan became household images. Caps on the court were suddenly more acceptable. We all should know what a quince is by now. Some of you might be able to hear Jimi Hendrix at this point. In retrospect, basketball was a backdrop for just an otherwise funny movie about what life in Southern California was like in the early ’90s.

But that’s also where it could shine. If Blake Griffin can find a way to maybe draw on his mixed race heritage and create a more modern storyline surrounding what it’s probably like to live in both worlds as a hoopster, then you’ve got a smartly updated plot that likely reflects something more along the lines of what we’re looking at in the world today. Griffin had just turned 3 years old when the original film was released, for what it’s worth. More of this and we’ll be good. 👇👇👇

To be clear, this isn’t some “keep your hands off my childhood memories” manifesto. Not remotely. This particular project has a higher degree of difficulty than most. Snipes and Harrelson weren’t unknowns when they made the original. It was actually the second sports movie they made together (Wildcats). Anyway, the reason why Space Jam works is because it was a movie that came out of the gate as a blockbuster. There were toys, clothes, a soundtrack to die for and everything else that a megamovie is supposed to have. Remaking it was just a matter of time.

“That movie [White Men Can’t Jump] changed [things]. Commercials went from Nike, slo-mo, special effects stuff, to the street,” Shelton said on The Nerdist podcast earlier this month. “From South Africa to Australia, I’ve received letters ever since. It changed the way kids on the street dressed. I’m proud of that.”

Recreating the magic of the OG version should not be the goal here. But using it as a springboard for another hilarious tale won’t be an easy task. Either way, we’re still going to Sizzler after we see it.