What Had Happened Was Trending stories on the intersections of race, sports & culture

Chargers player chronicles housing discrimination

in a blog post, he discusses his trouble in relocating from San Diego

7:20 PMWhen it comes to housing discrimination, Los Angeles is no different from any other big city in America. There has been redlining, segregation, plus other official and unofficial ways to prevent black folks from living near white people. If you want to jump in headfirst on that, feel free. Here’s a map, if you like visuals. Here’s a story, if you prefer words. And here’s a recent breakdown of a study.

Or, if you’re like me, you can just believe folks when they tell you it’s true. Such is the case for Brandon Mebane, who plays nose tackle for the Los Angeles Chargers. Not only that, he’s from Crenshaw in L.A., so when the franchise decided to relocate from San Diego, it meant a homecoming for him and his family. One problem: Brandon is black, which means that, even as an NFL player with a Super Bowl ring, people don’t want you in their neighborhood.

He most recently signed a three-year deal worth $13.5M, and in a recent blog post he detailed how much of a heartbreaker it was for him to have so much trouble finding a place to live in the city where he grew up. He lays out in perfect detail exactly how the color of your skin will keep you from having a roof over your head.

“Although, the house hunting part was fun, it became difficult once we actually started putting in our rental applications. Some owners in the suburbs we were visiting did not want us living in their house,” Mebane wrote in a post titled Homecoming. “Though we exceeded the standard tenant requirements, put together a competitive application with a Tier 1 credit score, references, a cover letter, and advanced payment, we were denied. This was not the first time we experienced this. We were also met with the same unwelcoming response trying to find a home in the suburbs of San Diego.”

Now, what’s most fascinating about this is that Mebane sprinkles his post with pictures from his personal life. A photo of himself, his wife and his daughter. This is not a dude coming in with a house half full of an entourage and a trailer full of all-terrain vehicles for his squad to go careening around on during their free time. This guy’s looking to stay home and chill.

Mind you, Mebane is 6 feet tall and over 300 pounds. Part of me feels like if he’s got to fight that hard to live in a neighborhood where he might not be safe in his own house, that’s a separate story.

Alas, they weren’t alone. His teammates had issues too.

“A teammate in the same situation offered to pay A YEAR upfront and was denied,” Mebane wrote. “One landlord even changed the requirements on another teammate after his family submitted their application so that they would no longer be eligible. It’s disheartening to have to go through this in 2017.”

Something tells me that Philip Rivers isn’t having this problem in his relocation. Might be time to buy, Brandon.

Daily Dose: 7/12/17

The MLB All-Star Game was a major success

7:20 PMWhen it comes to housing discrimination, Los Angeles is no different from any other big city in America. There has been redlining, segregation, plus other official and unofficial ways to prevent black folks from living near white people. If you want to jump in headfirst on that, feel free. Here’s a map, if you like visuals. Here’s a story, if you prefer words. And here’s a recent breakdown of a study.

Or, if you’re like me, you can just believe folks when they tell you it’s true. Such is the case for Brandon Mebane, who plays nose tackle for the Los Angeles Chargers. Not only that, he’s from Crenshaw in L.A., so when the franchise decided to relocate from San Diego, it meant a homecoming for him and his family. One problem: Brandon is black, which means that, even as an NFL player with a Super Bowl ring, people don’t want you in their neighborhood.

He most recently signed a three-year deal worth $13.5M, and in a recent blog post he detailed how much of a heartbreaker it was for him to have so much trouble finding a place to live in the city where he grew up. He lays out in perfect detail exactly how the color of your skin will keep you from having a roof over your head.

“Although, the house hunting part was fun, it became difficult once we actually started putting in our rental applications. Some owners in the suburbs we were visiting did not want us living in their house,” Mebane wrote in a post titled Homecoming. “Though we exceeded the standard tenant requirements, put together a competitive application with a Tier 1 credit score, references, a cover letter, and advanced payment, we were denied. This was not the first time we experienced this. We were also met with the same unwelcoming response trying to find a home in the suburbs of San Diego.”

Now, what’s most fascinating about this is that Mebane sprinkles his post with pictures from his personal life. A photo of himself, his wife and his daughter. This is not a dude coming in with a house half full of an entourage and a trailer full of all-terrain vehicles for his squad to go careening around on during their free time. This guy’s looking to stay home and chill.

Mind you, Mebane is 6 feet tall and over 300 pounds. Part of me feels like if he’s got to fight that hard to live in a neighborhood where he might not be safe in his own house, that’s a separate story.

Alas, they weren’t alone. His teammates had issues too.

“A teammate in the same situation offered to pay A YEAR upfront and was denied,” Mebane wrote. “One landlord even changed the requirements on another teammate after his family submitted their application so that they would no longer be eligible. It’s disheartening to have to go through this in 2017.”

Something tells me that Philip Rivers isn’t having this problem in his relocation. Might be time to buy, Brandon.

Daily Dose: 7/11/17

Baseball is set to celebrate itself

7:20 PMWhen it comes to housing discrimination, Los Angeles is no different from any other big city in America. There has been redlining, segregation, plus other official and unofficial ways to prevent black folks from living near white people. If you want to jump in headfirst on that, feel free. Here’s a map, if you like visuals. Here’s a story, if you prefer words. And here’s a recent breakdown of a study.

Or, if you’re like me, you can just believe folks when they tell you it’s true. Such is the case for Brandon Mebane, who plays nose tackle for the Los Angeles Chargers. Not only that, he’s from Crenshaw in L.A., so when the franchise decided to relocate from San Diego, it meant a homecoming for him and his family. One problem: Brandon is black, which means that, even as an NFL player with a Super Bowl ring, people don’t want you in their neighborhood.

He most recently signed a three-year deal worth $13.5M, and in a recent blog post he detailed how much of a heartbreaker it was for him to have so much trouble finding a place to live in the city where he grew up. He lays out in perfect detail exactly how the color of your skin will keep you from having a roof over your head.

“Although, the house hunting part was fun, it became difficult once we actually started putting in our rental applications. Some owners in the suburbs we were visiting did not want us living in their house,” Mebane wrote in a post titled Homecoming. “Though we exceeded the standard tenant requirements, put together a competitive application with a Tier 1 credit score, references, a cover letter, and advanced payment, we were denied. This was not the first time we experienced this. We were also met with the same unwelcoming response trying to find a home in the suburbs of San Diego.”

Now, what’s most fascinating about this is that Mebane sprinkles his post with pictures from his personal life. A photo of himself, his wife and his daughter. This is not a dude coming in with a house half full of an entourage and a trailer full of all-terrain vehicles for his squad to go careening around on during their free time. This guy’s looking to stay home and chill.

Mind you, Mebane is 6 feet tall and over 300 pounds. Part of me feels like if he’s got to fight that hard to live in a neighborhood where he might not be safe in his own house, that’s a separate story.

Alas, they weren’t alone. His teammates had issues too.

“A teammate in the same situation offered to pay A YEAR upfront and was denied,” Mebane wrote. “One landlord even changed the requirements on another teammate after his family submitted their application so that they would no longer be eligible. It’s disheartening to have to go through this in 2017.”

Something tells me that Philip Rivers isn’t having this problem in his relocation. Might be time to buy, Brandon.

The only reason Eric’s still around is because he’s black

Classic case of dating game affirmative action

7:20 PMWhen it comes to housing discrimination, Los Angeles is no different from any other big city in America. There has been redlining, segregation, plus other official and unofficial ways to prevent black folks from living near white people. If you want to jump in headfirst on that, feel free. Here’s a map, if you like visuals. Here’s a story, if you prefer words. And here’s a recent breakdown of a study.

Or, if you’re like me, you can just believe folks when they tell you it’s true. Such is the case for Brandon Mebane, who plays nose tackle for the Los Angeles Chargers. Not only that, he’s from Crenshaw in L.A., so when the franchise decided to relocate from San Diego, it meant a homecoming for him and his family. One problem: Brandon is black, which means that, even as an NFL player with a Super Bowl ring, people don’t want you in their neighborhood.

He most recently signed a three-year deal worth $13.5M, and in a recent blog post he detailed how much of a heartbreaker it was for him to have so much trouble finding a place to live in the city where he grew up. He lays out in perfect detail exactly how the color of your skin will keep you from having a roof over your head.

“Although, the house hunting part was fun, it became difficult once we actually started putting in our rental applications. Some owners in the suburbs we were visiting did not want us living in their house,” Mebane wrote in a post titled Homecoming. “Though we exceeded the standard tenant requirements, put together a competitive application with a Tier 1 credit score, references, a cover letter, and advanced payment, we were denied. This was not the first time we experienced this. We were also met with the same unwelcoming response trying to find a home in the suburbs of San Diego.”

Now, what’s most fascinating about this is that Mebane sprinkles his post with pictures from his personal life. A photo of himself, his wife and his daughter. This is not a dude coming in with a house half full of an entourage and a trailer full of all-terrain vehicles for his squad to go careening around on during their free time. This guy’s looking to stay home and chill.

Mind you, Mebane is 6 feet tall and over 300 pounds. Part of me feels like if he’s got to fight that hard to live in a neighborhood where he might not be safe in his own house, that’s a separate story.

Alas, they weren’t alone. His teammates had issues too.

“A teammate in the same situation offered to pay A YEAR upfront and was denied,” Mebane wrote. “One landlord even changed the requirements on another teammate after his family submitted their application so that they would no longer be eligible. It’s disheartening to have to go through this in 2017.”

Something tells me that Philip Rivers isn’t having this problem in his relocation. Might be time to buy, Brandon.

Daily Dose: 7/10/17

Blac Chyna speaks out about Rob Kardashian

7:20 PMWhen it comes to housing discrimination, Los Angeles is no different from any other big city in America. There has been redlining, segregation, plus other official and unofficial ways to prevent black folks from living near white people. If you want to jump in headfirst on that, feel free. Here’s a map, if you like visuals. Here’s a story, if you prefer words. And here’s a recent breakdown of a study.

Or, if you’re like me, you can just believe folks when they tell you it’s true. Such is the case for Brandon Mebane, who plays nose tackle for the Los Angeles Chargers. Not only that, he’s from Crenshaw in L.A., so when the franchise decided to relocate from San Diego, it meant a homecoming for him and his family. One problem: Brandon is black, which means that, even as an NFL player with a Super Bowl ring, people don’t want you in their neighborhood.

He most recently signed a three-year deal worth $13.5M, and in a recent blog post he detailed how much of a heartbreaker it was for him to have so much trouble finding a place to live in the city where he grew up. He lays out in perfect detail exactly how the color of your skin will keep you from having a roof over your head.

“Although, the house hunting part was fun, it became difficult once we actually started putting in our rental applications. Some owners in the suburbs we were visiting did not want us living in their house,” Mebane wrote in a post titled Homecoming. “Though we exceeded the standard tenant requirements, put together a competitive application with a Tier 1 credit score, references, a cover letter, and advanced payment, we were denied. This was not the first time we experienced this. We were also met with the same unwelcoming response trying to find a home in the suburbs of San Diego.”

Now, what’s most fascinating about this is that Mebane sprinkles his post with pictures from his personal life. A photo of himself, his wife and his daughter. This is not a dude coming in with a house half full of an entourage and a trailer full of all-terrain vehicles for his squad to go careening around on during their free time. This guy’s looking to stay home and chill.

Mind you, Mebane is 6 feet tall and over 300 pounds. Part of me feels like if he’s got to fight that hard to live in a neighborhood where he might not be safe in his own house, that’s a separate story.

Alas, they weren’t alone. His teammates had issues too.

“A teammate in the same situation offered to pay A YEAR upfront and was denied,” Mebane wrote. “One landlord even changed the requirements on another teammate after his family submitted their application so that they would no longer be eligible. It’s disheartening to have to go through this in 2017.”

Something tells me that Philip Rivers isn’t having this problem in his relocation. Might be time to buy, Brandon.