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Clark Atlanta president resigns, effective Dec. 7

Ronald A. Johnson had led the school since July 2015

5:38 PMClark Atlanta University (CAU) president Ronald A. Johnson is leaving the school, his resignation effective Dec. 7.

“I make this decision for personal reasons and I advised our Board of Trustees of my intentions today,” Johnson said in his resignation letter. “While I am reluctant to leave this great University and its incredible, faculty and staff, I am incredibly proud of what we accomplished together during this period of institutional transformation.”

Johnson had been president since July 2015.

Four years ago, Johnson became the fourth president of CAU. During his tenure, he claims to have made strides to preserve the school and continue its 153-year legacy that dates from preceding institutions Atlanta University and Clark College.

On Oct. 15, Johnson was named chairman of the Consumer Advisory Board of the U.S. Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection for 2018-19. According to its website, the board’s duties include informing the public about emerging practices or trends in the consumer finance industry, and it shares analysis and recommendations.

The long-term health and sustainability of the institution was strengthened under the leadership of Johnson, according to a statement issued by the school. Additionally, the school said its first-year retention rate increased to a record 70 percent from 66 percent and its six-year graduation rate improved from 38 percent to 45 percent from 2015-18.

According to Johnson, from 2015-18, Moody Investor Services upgraded CAU’s credit outlook from negative to positive and CAU alumni giving increased by 50 percent during that same period. The first $1 million donation from a university graduate, award-winning director/producer Kenya Barris, was received under Johnson’s leadership.

“The student body will not miss President Johnson because a lot of students feel as though he did nothing beneficial for the school,” said junior Alexis Grace.

Clark Atlanta, which had about 3,700 students enrolled last year, will begin its search for its next president immediately.

“I think it is unfortunate. He was new to the institution and his resignation came as a complete surprise,” said Markayla Brooks, junior at CAU.

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5:38 PMClark Atlanta University (CAU) president Ronald A. Johnson is leaving the school, his resignation effective Dec. 7.

“I make this decision for personal reasons and I advised our Board of Trustees of my intentions today,” Johnson said in his resignation letter. “While I am reluctant to leave this great University and its incredible, faculty and staff, I am incredibly proud of what we accomplished together during this period of institutional transformation.”

Johnson had been president since July 2015.

Four years ago, Johnson became the fourth president of CAU. During his tenure, he claims to have made strides to preserve the school and continue its 153-year legacy that dates from preceding institutions Atlanta University and Clark College.

On Oct. 15, Johnson was named chairman of the Consumer Advisory Board of the U.S. Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection for 2018-19. According to its website, the board’s duties include informing the public about emerging practices or trends in the consumer finance industry, and it shares analysis and recommendations.

The long-term health and sustainability of the institution was strengthened under the leadership of Johnson, according to a statement issued by the school. Additionally, the school said its first-year retention rate increased to a record 70 percent from 66 percent and its six-year graduation rate improved from 38 percent to 45 percent from 2015-18.

According to Johnson, from 2015-18, Moody Investor Services upgraded CAU’s credit outlook from negative to positive and CAU alumni giving increased by 50 percent during that same period. The first $1 million donation from a university graduate, award-winning director/producer Kenya Barris, was received under Johnson’s leadership.

“The student body will not miss President Johnson because a lot of students feel as though he did nothing beneficial for the school,” said junior Alexis Grace.

Clark Atlanta, which had about 3,700 students enrolled last year, will begin its search for its next president immediately.

“I think it is unfortunate. He was new to the institution and his resignation came as a complete surprise,” said Markayla Brooks, junior at CAU.

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5:38 PMClark Atlanta University (CAU) president Ronald A. Johnson is leaving the school, his resignation effective Dec. 7.

“I make this decision for personal reasons and I advised our Board of Trustees of my intentions today,” Johnson said in his resignation letter. “While I am reluctant to leave this great University and its incredible, faculty and staff, I am incredibly proud of what we accomplished together during this period of institutional transformation.”

Johnson had been president since July 2015.

Four years ago, Johnson became the fourth president of CAU. During his tenure, he claims to have made strides to preserve the school and continue its 153-year legacy that dates from preceding institutions Atlanta University and Clark College.

On Oct. 15, Johnson was named chairman of the Consumer Advisory Board of the U.S. Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection for 2018-19. According to its website, the board’s duties include informing the public about emerging practices or trends in the consumer finance industry, and it shares analysis and recommendations.

The long-term health and sustainability of the institution was strengthened under the leadership of Johnson, according to a statement issued by the school. Additionally, the school said its first-year retention rate increased to a record 70 percent from 66 percent and its six-year graduation rate improved from 38 percent to 45 percent from 2015-18.

According to Johnson, from 2015-18, Moody Investor Services upgraded CAU’s credit outlook from negative to positive and CAU alumni giving increased by 50 percent during that same period. The first $1 million donation from a university graduate, award-winning director/producer Kenya Barris, was received under Johnson’s leadership.

“The student body will not miss President Johnson because a lot of students feel as though he did nothing beneficial for the school,” said junior Alexis Grace.

Clark Atlanta, which had about 3,700 students enrolled last year, will begin its search for its next president immediately.

“I think it is unfortunate. He was new to the institution and his resignation came as a complete surprise,” said Markayla Brooks, junior at CAU.