What Had Happened Was Trending stories on the intersections of race, sports & culture

Daily Dose: 12/27/16

President Obama says he could have beaten Donald Trump in the November election

10:00 AMI’m still here. Clinton Yates is off on an international expedition with Raven-Symone, exploring the multiple continents of Africa. Let’s get to it.

Stunt on em, Barry O. President Barack Obama, who has less than a month left in office, appeared on The Axe Files podcast on Monday with former adviser David Axelrod, telling the host that he would have beaten President-elect Donald Trump had he run for office again. Obviously, U.S. presidents are only eligible for two terms, but Obama believes that had he been eligible, his progressive message and administrative accomplishments — namely the Affordable Care Act —would have resonated with a base Hillary Clinton missed out on: the white working class. Trump, of course, disagreed with Obama’s assertion, but one can only imagine this is the expression the current president had on his face when he made the statement:

Terry Bradshaw might want to walk back those comments now. The Hall of Fame quarterback put his foot in his mouth last week when he told FS1 that Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin was not a “great coach.” Bradshaw, who won four Super Bowls with the Steelers, was uncharacteristically harsh on Tomlin, saying, “He’s a nice coach. To me, I’ve said this, he’s really a great cheerleader guy. I don’t know what he does. I don’t think he is a great coach at all.” The only problem with that is Tomlin, since the 2007 season, has amassed a 102-57 record, appeared in two Super Bowls, won Super Bowl XLIII, and has never had a losing season. He’s also won five AFC North titles in that span. Tomlin’s predecessor, Bill Cowher, also appeared in two Super Bowls — winning one during the 2005 season — but it took a decade for him to make it to the second one. Cowher also missed the postseason five times during his 15-year tenure, including three losing seasons. With all that said, a year before Cowher retired from coaching in 2007, Bradshaw told the Palm Beach Post that “the wonderful thing about Cowher is that he has a plan. Great coaches believe in their plan.” Two coaches, two similar resumes, two different outcomes.

The post-election stories keep getting scarier. This time, The Washington Post takes us to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, a small town right outside of Nashville, which has become a microcosm of anti-Muslim resentment over the past couple of years. Despite a Muslim population of barely 1 percent in a town of 126,000, Murfreesboro has been the site of a proposed Sharia law ban and a lawsuit against the building of a mosque that went all the way up to the Supreme Court. What’s most unsettling about what’s happening in Murfreesboro — outside of targeted harassment at schools, places of worship and convenience stores — is how candidly offensive some of the residents can be. There’s the unnamed businessman who believes Muslims want to “kill you and take your wife as a sex slave.” (This man refused to give his name because he employs Muslims.) There’s also the elderly white couple that lives with their converted daughter and her Muslim husband who believe in a Muslim registry and don’t consider the harm that might come their family’s way simply for their religion. A few people in the story refer to their Muslim counterparts as “them.” The next few years will be difficult for a ton of people.


Winner of Monday: Former NBA coach George Karl

Excerpts from Karl’s forthcoming book, Furious George: My Forty Years Surviving NBA Divas, Clueless GMs, and Poor Shot Selection, have been rolling out over the past week now, getting the former coach into trouble on multiple occasions. But it’s the passages that were reportedly removed that made Karl a winner this week. Sure, this happened on Saturday, but I am just now getting to it, so bear with me. Anyway, Karl didn’t want those DeMarcus Cousins problems. Trust me.

Loser of Monday: Chicago crowd

Phil “CM Punk” Brooks is a Chicago native and former professional wrestler employed by WWE. CM Punk infamously left the company in 2014 and crowds have been chanting his name at WWE events for almost three years now. CM Punk had his first UFC fight last September and lost in an embarrassingly two minutes, 14 seconds. WWE chief brand officer Stephanie McMahon finally shut the Chicago crowd up for good on Monday night with this sick burn:

What to look forward to on Tuesday: Japanese dignitary visit to Pearl Harbor

Shinzo Abe will be the first Japanese prime minster to visit the USS Arizona Memorial battleship, where over 1,100 servicemen died during the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Before we Americans get too pretentious about the nearly eight-decade gap, Obama was the first sitting U.S. president to step foot in Hiroshima — where almost 100,000 people were killed by an atomic bomb — when he visited this past May.

Daily Dose: 12/26/16

George Michael dies at 53

10:00 AMI’m still here. Clinton Yates is off on an international expedition with Raven-Symone, exploring the multiple continents of Africa. Let’s get to it.

Stunt on em, Barry O. President Barack Obama, who has less than a month left in office, appeared on The Axe Files podcast on Monday with former adviser David Axelrod, telling the host that he would have beaten President-elect Donald Trump had he run for office again. Obviously, U.S. presidents are only eligible for two terms, but Obama believes that had he been eligible, his progressive message and administrative accomplishments — namely the Affordable Care Act —would have resonated with a base Hillary Clinton missed out on: the white working class. Trump, of course, disagreed with Obama’s assertion, but one can only imagine this is the expression the current president had on his face when he made the statement:

Terry Bradshaw might want to walk back those comments now. The Hall of Fame quarterback put his foot in his mouth last week when he told FS1 that Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin was not a “great coach.” Bradshaw, who won four Super Bowls with the Steelers, was uncharacteristically harsh on Tomlin, saying, “He’s a nice coach. To me, I’ve said this, he’s really a great cheerleader guy. I don’t know what he does. I don’t think he is a great coach at all.” The only problem with that is Tomlin, since the 2007 season, has amassed a 102-57 record, appeared in two Super Bowls, won Super Bowl XLIII, and has never had a losing season. He’s also won five AFC North titles in that span. Tomlin’s predecessor, Bill Cowher, also appeared in two Super Bowls — winning one during the 2005 season — but it took a decade for him to make it to the second one. Cowher also missed the postseason five times during his 15-year tenure, including three losing seasons. With all that said, a year before Cowher retired from coaching in 2007, Bradshaw told the Palm Beach Post that “the wonderful thing about Cowher is that he has a plan. Great coaches believe in their plan.” Two coaches, two similar resumes, two different outcomes.

The post-election stories keep getting scarier. This time, The Washington Post takes us to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, a small town right outside of Nashville, which has become a microcosm of anti-Muslim resentment over the past couple of years. Despite a Muslim population of barely 1 percent in a town of 126,000, Murfreesboro has been the site of a proposed Sharia law ban and a lawsuit against the building of a mosque that went all the way up to the Supreme Court. What’s most unsettling about what’s happening in Murfreesboro — outside of targeted harassment at schools, places of worship and convenience stores — is how candidly offensive some of the residents can be. There’s the unnamed businessman who believes Muslims want to “kill you and take your wife as a sex slave.” (This man refused to give his name because he employs Muslims.) There’s also the elderly white couple that lives with their converted daughter and her Muslim husband who believe in a Muslim registry and don’t consider the harm that might come their family’s way simply for their religion. A few people in the story refer to their Muslim counterparts as “them.” The next few years will be difficult for a ton of people.


Winner of Monday: Former NBA coach George Karl

Excerpts from Karl’s forthcoming book, Furious George: My Forty Years Surviving NBA Divas, Clueless GMs, and Poor Shot Selection, have been rolling out over the past week now, getting the former coach into trouble on multiple occasions. But it’s the passages that were reportedly removed that made Karl a winner this week. Sure, this happened on Saturday, but I am just now getting to it, so bear with me. Anyway, Karl didn’t want those DeMarcus Cousins problems. Trust me.

Loser of Monday: Chicago crowd

Phil “CM Punk” Brooks is a Chicago native and former professional wrestler employed by WWE. CM Punk infamously left the company in 2014 and crowds have been chanting his name at WWE events for almost three years now. CM Punk had his first UFC fight last September and lost in an embarrassingly two minutes, 14 seconds. WWE chief brand officer Stephanie McMahon finally shut the Chicago crowd up for good on Monday night with this sick burn:

What to look forward to on Tuesday: Japanese dignitary visit to Pearl Harbor

Shinzo Abe will be the first Japanese prime minster to visit the USS Arizona Memorial battleship, where over 1,100 servicemen died during the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Before we Americans get too pretentious about the nearly eight-decade gap, Obama was the first sitting U.S. president to step foot in Hiroshima — where almost 100,000 people were killed by an atomic bomb — when he visited this past May.

‘FIFA and Chill’ is the show you need to be watching

This week, they’ve got The Chicken Connoisseur

10:00 AMI’m still here. Clinton Yates is off on an international expedition with Raven-Symone, exploring the multiple continents of Africa. Let’s get to it.

Stunt on em, Barry O. President Barack Obama, who has less than a month left in office, appeared on The Axe Files podcast on Monday with former adviser David Axelrod, telling the host that he would have beaten President-elect Donald Trump had he run for office again. Obviously, U.S. presidents are only eligible for two terms, but Obama believes that had he been eligible, his progressive message and administrative accomplishments — namely the Affordable Care Act —would have resonated with a base Hillary Clinton missed out on: the white working class. Trump, of course, disagreed with Obama’s assertion, but one can only imagine this is the expression the current president had on his face when he made the statement:

Terry Bradshaw might want to walk back those comments now. The Hall of Fame quarterback put his foot in his mouth last week when he told FS1 that Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin was not a “great coach.” Bradshaw, who won four Super Bowls with the Steelers, was uncharacteristically harsh on Tomlin, saying, “He’s a nice coach. To me, I’ve said this, he’s really a great cheerleader guy. I don’t know what he does. I don’t think he is a great coach at all.” The only problem with that is Tomlin, since the 2007 season, has amassed a 102-57 record, appeared in two Super Bowls, won Super Bowl XLIII, and has never had a losing season. He’s also won five AFC North titles in that span. Tomlin’s predecessor, Bill Cowher, also appeared in two Super Bowls — winning one during the 2005 season — but it took a decade for him to make it to the second one. Cowher also missed the postseason five times during his 15-year tenure, including three losing seasons. With all that said, a year before Cowher retired from coaching in 2007, Bradshaw told the Palm Beach Post that “the wonderful thing about Cowher is that he has a plan. Great coaches believe in their plan.” Two coaches, two similar resumes, two different outcomes.

The post-election stories keep getting scarier. This time, The Washington Post takes us to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, a small town right outside of Nashville, which has become a microcosm of anti-Muslim resentment over the past couple of years. Despite a Muslim population of barely 1 percent in a town of 126,000, Murfreesboro has been the site of a proposed Sharia law ban and a lawsuit against the building of a mosque that went all the way up to the Supreme Court. What’s most unsettling about what’s happening in Murfreesboro — outside of targeted harassment at schools, places of worship and convenience stores — is how candidly offensive some of the residents can be. There’s the unnamed businessman who believes Muslims want to “kill you and take your wife as a sex slave.” (This man refused to give his name because he employs Muslims.) There’s also the elderly white couple that lives with their converted daughter and her Muslim husband who believe in a Muslim registry and don’t consider the harm that might come their family’s way simply for their religion. A few people in the story refer to their Muslim counterparts as “them.” The next few years will be difficult for a ton of people.


Winner of Monday: Former NBA coach George Karl

Excerpts from Karl’s forthcoming book, Furious George: My Forty Years Surviving NBA Divas, Clueless GMs, and Poor Shot Selection, have been rolling out over the past week now, getting the former coach into trouble on multiple occasions. But it’s the passages that were reportedly removed that made Karl a winner this week. Sure, this happened on Saturday, but I am just now getting to it, so bear with me. Anyway, Karl didn’t want those DeMarcus Cousins problems. Trust me.

Loser of Monday: Chicago crowd

Phil “CM Punk” Brooks is a Chicago native and former professional wrestler employed by WWE. CM Punk infamously left the company in 2014 and crowds have been chanting his name at WWE events for almost three years now. CM Punk had his first UFC fight last September and lost in an embarrassingly two minutes, 14 seconds. WWE chief brand officer Stephanie McMahon finally shut the Chicago crowd up for good on Monday night with this sick burn:

What to look forward to on Tuesday: Japanese dignitary visit to Pearl Harbor

Shinzo Abe will be the first Japanese prime minster to visit the USS Arizona Memorial battleship, where over 1,100 servicemen died during the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Before we Americans get too pretentious about the nearly eight-decade gap, Obama was the first sitting U.S. president to step foot in Hiroshima — where almost 100,000 people were killed by an atomic bomb — when he visited this past May.

Daily Dose: 12/23/16

Viral video puts Fort Worth, Texas, under the national microscope

10:00 AMI’m still here. Clinton Yates is off on an international expedition with Raven-Symone, exploring the multiple continents of Africa. Let’s get to it.

Stunt on em, Barry O. President Barack Obama, who has less than a month left in office, appeared on The Axe Files podcast on Monday with former adviser David Axelrod, telling the host that he would have beaten President-elect Donald Trump had he run for office again. Obviously, U.S. presidents are only eligible for two terms, but Obama believes that had he been eligible, his progressive message and administrative accomplishments — namely the Affordable Care Act —would have resonated with a base Hillary Clinton missed out on: the white working class. Trump, of course, disagreed with Obama’s assertion, but one can only imagine this is the expression the current president had on his face when he made the statement:

Terry Bradshaw might want to walk back those comments now. The Hall of Fame quarterback put his foot in his mouth last week when he told FS1 that Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin was not a “great coach.” Bradshaw, who won four Super Bowls with the Steelers, was uncharacteristically harsh on Tomlin, saying, “He’s a nice coach. To me, I’ve said this, he’s really a great cheerleader guy. I don’t know what he does. I don’t think he is a great coach at all.” The only problem with that is Tomlin, since the 2007 season, has amassed a 102-57 record, appeared in two Super Bowls, won Super Bowl XLIII, and has never had a losing season. He’s also won five AFC North titles in that span. Tomlin’s predecessor, Bill Cowher, also appeared in two Super Bowls — winning one during the 2005 season — but it took a decade for him to make it to the second one. Cowher also missed the postseason five times during his 15-year tenure, including three losing seasons. With all that said, a year before Cowher retired from coaching in 2007, Bradshaw told the Palm Beach Post that “the wonderful thing about Cowher is that he has a plan. Great coaches believe in their plan.” Two coaches, two similar resumes, two different outcomes.

The post-election stories keep getting scarier. This time, The Washington Post takes us to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, a small town right outside of Nashville, which has become a microcosm of anti-Muslim resentment over the past couple of years. Despite a Muslim population of barely 1 percent in a town of 126,000, Murfreesboro has been the site of a proposed Sharia law ban and a lawsuit against the building of a mosque that went all the way up to the Supreme Court. What’s most unsettling about what’s happening in Murfreesboro — outside of targeted harassment at schools, places of worship and convenience stores — is how candidly offensive some of the residents can be. There’s the unnamed businessman who believes Muslims want to “kill you and take your wife as a sex slave.” (This man refused to give his name because he employs Muslims.) There’s also the elderly white couple that lives with their converted daughter and her Muslim husband who believe in a Muslim registry and don’t consider the harm that might come their family’s way simply for their religion. A few people in the story refer to their Muslim counterparts as “them.” The next few years will be difficult for a ton of people.


Winner of Monday: Former NBA coach George Karl

Excerpts from Karl’s forthcoming book, Furious George: My Forty Years Surviving NBA Divas, Clueless GMs, and Poor Shot Selection, have been rolling out over the past week now, getting the former coach into trouble on multiple occasions. But it’s the passages that were reportedly removed that made Karl a winner this week. Sure, this happened on Saturday, but I am just now getting to it, so bear with me. Anyway, Karl didn’t want those DeMarcus Cousins problems. Trust me.

Loser of Monday: Chicago crowd

Phil “CM Punk” Brooks is a Chicago native and former professional wrestler employed by WWE. CM Punk infamously left the company in 2014 and crowds have been chanting his name at WWE events for almost three years now. CM Punk had his first UFC fight last September and lost in an embarrassingly two minutes, 14 seconds. WWE chief brand officer Stephanie McMahon finally shut the Chicago crowd up for good on Monday night with this sick burn:

What to look forward to on Tuesday: Japanese dignitary visit to Pearl Harbor

Shinzo Abe will be the first Japanese prime minster to visit the USS Arizona Memorial battleship, where over 1,100 servicemen died during the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Before we Americans get too pretentious about the nearly eight-decade gap, Obama was the first sitting U.S. president to step foot in Hiroshima — where almost 100,000 people were killed by an atomic bomb — when he visited this past May.

All Day Podcast: 12/21/16

The best of 2016, breaking down ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’ and catching up with Eric Dickerson

10:00 AMI’m still here. Clinton Yates is off on an international expedition with Raven-Symone, exploring the multiple continents of Africa. Let’s get to it.

Stunt on em, Barry O. President Barack Obama, who has less than a month left in office, appeared on The Axe Files podcast on Monday with former adviser David Axelrod, telling the host that he would have beaten President-elect Donald Trump had he run for office again. Obviously, U.S. presidents are only eligible for two terms, but Obama believes that had he been eligible, his progressive message and administrative accomplishments — namely the Affordable Care Act —would have resonated with a base Hillary Clinton missed out on: the white working class. Trump, of course, disagreed with Obama’s assertion, but one can only imagine this is the expression the current president had on his face when he made the statement:

Terry Bradshaw might want to walk back those comments now. The Hall of Fame quarterback put his foot in his mouth last week when he told FS1 that Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin was not a “great coach.” Bradshaw, who won four Super Bowls with the Steelers, was uncharacteristically harsh on Tomlin, saying, “He’s a nice coach. To me, I’ve said this, he’s really a great cheerleader guy. I don’t know what he does. I don’t think he is a great coach at all.” The only problem with that is Tomlin, since the 2007 season, has amassed a 102-57 record, appeared in two Super Bowls, won Super Bowl XLIII, and has never had a losing season. He’s also won five AFC North titles in that span. Tomlin’s predecessor, Bill Cowher, also appeared in two Super Bowls — winning one during the 2005 season — but it took a decade for him to make it to the second one. Cowher also missed the postseason five times during his 15-year tenure, including three losing seasons. With all that said, a year before Cowher retired from coaching in 2007, Bradshaw told the Palm Beach Post that “the wonderful thing about Cowher is that he has a plan. Great coaches believe in their plan.” Two coaches, two similar resumes, two different outcomes.

The post-election stories keep getting scarier. This time, The Washington Post takes us to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, a small town right outside of Nashville, which has become a microcosm of anti-Muslim resentment over the past couple of years. Despite a Muslim population of barely 1 percent in a town of 126,000, Murfreesboro has been the site of a proposed Sharia law ban and a lawsuit against the building of a mosque that went all the way up to the Supreme Court. What’s most unsettling about what’s happening in Murfreesboro — outside of targeted harassment at schools, places of worship and convenience stores — is how candidly offensive some of the residents can be. There’s the unnamed businessman who believes Muslims want to “kill you and take your wife as a sex slave.” (This man refused to give his name because he employs Muslims.) There’s also the elderly white couple that lives with their converted daughter and her Muslim husband who believe in a Muslim registry and don’t consider the harm that might come their family’s way simply for their religion. A few people in the story refer to their Muslim counterparts as “them.” The next few years will be difficult for a ton of people.


Winner of Monday: Former NBA coach George Karl

Excerpts from Karl’s forthcoming book, Furious George: My Forty Years Surviving NBA Divas, Clueless GMs, and Poor Shot Selection, have been rolling out over the past week now, getting the former coach into trouble on multiple occasions. But it’s the passages that were reportedly removed that made Karl a winner this week. Sure, this happened on Saturday, but I am just now getting to it, so bear with me. Anyway, Karl didn’t want those DeMarcus Cousins problems. Trust me.

Loser of Monday: Chicago crowd

Phil “CM Punk” Brooks is a Chicago native and former professional wrestler employed by WWE. CM Punk infamously left the company in 2014 and crowds have been chanting his name at WWE events for almost three years now. CM Punk had his first UFC fight last September and lost in an embarrassingly two minutes, 14 seconds. WWE chief brand officer Stephanie McMahon finally shut the Chicago crowd up for good on Monday night with this sick burn:

What to look forward to on Tuesday: Japanese dignitary visit to Pearl Harbor

Shinzo Abe will be the first Japanese prime minster to visit the USS Arizona Memorial battleship, where over 1,100 servicemen died during the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Before we Americans get too pretentious about the nearly eight-decade gap, Obama was the first sitting U.S. president to step foot in Hiroshima — where almost 100,000 people were killed by an atomic bomb — when he visited this past May.

Daily Dose: 12/22/16

What’s the best Christmas movie of our time?

10:00 AMI’m still here. Clinton Yates is off on an international expedition with Raven-Symone, exploring the multiple continents of Africa. Let’s get to it.

Stunt on em, Barry O. President Barack Obama, who has less than a month left in office, appeared on The Axe Files podcast on Monday with former adviser David Axelrod, telling the host that he would have beaten President-elect Donald Trump had he run for office again. Obviously, U.S. presidents are only eligible for two terms, but Obama believes that had he been eligible, his progressive message and administrative accomplishments — namely the Affordable Care Act —would have resonated with a base Hillary Clinton missed out on: the white working class. Trump, of course, disagreed with Obama’s assertion, but one can only imagine this is the expression the current president had on his face when he made the statement:

Terry Bradshaw might want to walk back those comments now. The Hall of Fame quarterback put his foot in his mouth last week when he told FS1 that Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin was not a “great coach.” Bradshaw, who won four Super Bowls with the Steelers, was uncharacteristically harsh on Tomlin, saying, “He’s a nice coach. To me, I’ve said this, he’s really a great cheerleader guy. I don’t know what he does. I don’t think he is a great coach at all.” The only problem with that is Tomlin, since the 2007 season, has amassed a 102-57 record, appeared in two Super Bowls, won Super Bowl XLIII, and has never had a losing season. He’s also won five AFC North titles in that span. Tomlin’s predecessor, Bill Cowher, also appeared in two Super Bowls — winning one during the 2005 season — but it took a decade for him to make it to the second one. Cowher also missed the postseason five times during his 15-year tenure, including three losing seasons. With all that said, a year before Cowher retired from coaching in 2007, Bradshaw told the Palm Beach Post that “the wonderful thing about Cowher is that he has a plan. Great coaches believe in their plan.” Two coaches, two similar resumes, two different outcomes.

The post-election stories keep getting scarier. This time, The Washington Post takes us to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, a small town right outside of Nashville, which has become a microcosm of anti-Muslim resentment over the past couple of years. Despite a Muslim population of barely 1 percent in a town of 126,000, Murfreesboro has been the site of a proposed Sharia law ban and a lawsuit against the building of a mosque that went all the way up to the Supreme Court. What’s most unsettling about what’s happening in Murfreesboro — outside of targeted harassment at schools, places of worship and convenience stores — is how candidly offensive some of the residents can be. There’s the unnamed businessman who believes Muslims want to “kill you and take your wife as a sex slave.” (This man refused to give his name because he employs Muslims.) There’s also the elderly white couple that lives with their converted daughter and her Muslim husband who believe in a Muslim registry and don’t consider the harm that might come their family’s way simply for their religion. A few people in the story refer to their Muslim counterparts as “them.” The next few years will be difficult for a ton of people.


Winner of Monday: Former NBA coach George Karl

Excerpts from Karl’s forthcoming book, Furious George: My Forty Years Surviving NBA Divas, Clueless GMs, and Poor Shot Selection, have been rolling out over the past week now, getting the former coach into trouble on multiple occasions. But it’s the passages that were reportedly removed that made Karl a winner this week. Sure, this happened on Saturday, but I am just now getting to it, so bear with me. Anyway, Karl didn’t want those DeMarcus Cousins problems. Trust me.

Loser of Monday: Chicago crowd

Phil “CM Punk” Brooks is a Chicago native and former professional wrestler employed by WWE. CM Punk infamously left the company in 2014 and crowds have been chanting his name at WWE events for almost three years now. CM Punk had his first UFC fight last September and lost in an embarrassingly two minutes, 14 seconds. WWE chief brand officer Stephanie McMahon finally shut the Chicago crowd up for good on Monday night with this sick burn:

What to look forward to on Tuesday: Japanese dignitary visit to Pearl Harbor

Shinzo Abe will be the first Japanese prime minster to visit the USS Arizona Memorial battleship, where over 1,100 servicemen died during the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Before we Americans get too pretentious about the nearly eight-decade gap, Obama was the first sitting U.S. president to step foot in Hiroshima — where almost 100,000 people were killed by an atomic bomb — when he visited this past May.