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Daily Dose: 12/30/16

Five years from now, the Greek Freak could be a $200 million man

11:00 AMThis is my last day of Daily Dose, as Clinton Yates returns on Monday. It’s been a blast this week running down the most interesting and noteworthy stories. Let’s get to it.

It’s coming up on three years since the city of Flint, Michigan, switched its water supply to the lead-contaminated Flint River. During that time period, anywhere between 6,000 to 12,000 Flint children have been exposed to dangerous levels of lead, according to the United Way of Genesee County. Ever since problems began to arise with the water supply in the city, government officials in the state were either willfully ignorant or purposely negligent in its handling of the situation, exposing tens of thousands of people to unsafe water. Over the past year, the water supply has been switched back to Detroit water, lawsuits have been filed, and officials have been charged, but contaminated water is still an issue. FiveThirtyEight, in its end-of-the-year awards, recognizes the man who blew this story wide open.

It’s the Cold War 2.0. On Thursday, the Obama administration announced new measures against Russia for its role in the alleged interference with this year’s presidential election. The measures include sanctions against multiple Russian agencies, including the spy agency that succeeded the KGB, the expulsion of 35 Russian operatives from the country, and the closing of two Russian-owned facilities on the East Coast. Early Friday morning, Russian officials shot back that they would recommend the expulsion of 35 American diplomats in their country, which is as petty as it sounds. While all of this may amount to a penis-measuring contest between the two countries, a recent story in The New Yorker about how the United States almost accidentally initiated a nuclear attack against the Soviet Union in the 1980s should give us all pause.

The Greek Freak is about to get paid … in five years. I won’t bog you down with the confusing numbers and terminology of the new collective bargaining agreement the NBA owners and players recently agreed to, but I will tell you that (no bias here) versatile forward and fan favorite Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks, for his next contract in 2021 (he just signed an extension in September), could nab a deal worth $240 million if he stays with his current team. That’s multiple-time MVP winners Stephen Curry and LeBron James money. Here’s to more dunks, struts and amazing stories from The Greek Freak for many years.


Winner of Thursday: rapper album sales

When a mixtape based on a Broadway play can sell almost 200,000 units in its first week, that means it was a good year for music. Complex runs down the first-week numbers for some of the most talked about albums in 2016.

Loser of Thursday: Simon & Schuster

The New York-based publishing company reportedly offered Breitbart editor and white nationalist Milo Yiannopoulos a book deal worth $250,000. Yiannopoulos, who was famously axed from Twitter after he incited a swarm of hateful and violent messages toward Ghostbusters star Leslie Jones, was a key agitator during the misogynist “Gamergate” controversy of 2014. The deal is not too surprising, though, considering Simon & Schuster has published the works of Donald Trump, Dick Cheney and Glenn Beck in the past.

What to look forward to this weekend: Driving safely

This weekend is New Year’s Eve, which means there will be a lot of alcohol and too much drinking and driving. Stay safe out there. AAA probably provides assistance in your area.

Daily Dose: 12/29/16

Jim Brown, Ray Lewis and Omarosa Manigault having a day party for Donald Trump during inauguration

11:00 AMThis is my last day of Daily Dose, as Clinton Yates returns on Monday. It’s been a blast this week running down the most interesting and noteworthy stories. Let’s get to it.

It’s coming up on three years since the city of Flint, Michigan, switched its water supply to the lead-contaminated Flint River. During that time period, anywhere between 6,000 to 12,000 Flint children have been exposed to dangerous levels of lead, according to the United Way of Genesee County. Ever since problems began to arise with the water supply in the city, government officials in the state were either willfully ignorant or purposely negligent in its handling of the situation, exposing tens of thousands of people to unsafe water. Over the past year, the water supply has been switched back to Detroit water, lawsuits have been filed, and officials have been charged, but contaminated water is still an issue. FiveThirtyEight, in its end-of-the-year awards, recognizes the man who blew this story wide open.

It’s the Cold War 2.0. On Thursday, the Obama administration announced new measures against Russia for its role in the alleged interference with this year’s presidential election. The measures include sanctions against multiple Russian agencies, including the spy agency that succeeded the KGB, the expulsion of 35 Russian operatives from the country, and the closing of two Russian-owned facilities on the East Coast. Early Friday morning, Russian officials shot back that they would recommend the expulsion of 35 American diplomats in their country, which is as petty as it sounds. While all of this may amount to a penis-measuring contest between the two countries, a recent story in The New Yorker about how the United States almost accidentally initiated a nuclear attack against the Soviet Union in the 1980s should give us all pause.

The Greek Freak is about to get paid … in five years. I won’t bog you down with the confusing numbers and terminology of the new collective bargaining agreement the NBA owners and players recently agreed to, but I will tell you that (no bias here) versatile forward and fan favorite Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks, for his next contract in 2021 (he just signed an extension in September), could nab a deal worth $240 million if he stays with his current team. That’s multiple-time MVP winners Stephen Curry and LeBron James money. Here’s to more dunks, struts and amazing stories from The Greek Freak for many years.


Winner of Thursday: rapper album sales

When a mixtape based on a Broadway play can sell almost 200,000 units in its first week, that means it was a good year for music. Complex runs down the first-week numbers for some of the most talked about albums in 2016.

Loser of Thursday: Simon & Schuster

The New York-based publishing company reportedly offered Breitbart editor and white nationalist Milo Yiannopoulos a book deal worth $250,000. Yiannopoulos, who was famously axed from Twitter after he incited a swarm of hateful and violent messages toward Ghostbusters star Leslie Jones, was a key agitator during the misogynist “Gamergate” controversy of 2014. The deal is not too surprising, though, considering Simon & Schuster has published the works of Donald Trump, Dick Cheney and Glenn Beck in the past.

What to look forward to this weekend: Driving safely

This weekend is New Year’s Eve, which means there will be a lot of alcohol and too much drinking and driving. Stay safe out there. AAA probably provides assistance in your area.

Daily Dose: 12/28/16

Rest in peace, Princess Leia

11:00 AMThis is my last day of Daily Dose, as Clinton Yates returns on Monday. It’s been a blast this week running down the most interesting and noteworthy stories. Let’s get to it.

It’s coming up on three years since the city of Flint, Michigan, switched its water supply to the lead-contaminated Flint River. During that time period, anywhere between 6,000 to 12,000 Flint children have been exposed to dangerous levels of lead, according to the United Way of Genesee County. Ever since problems began to arise with the water supply in the city, government officials in the state were either willfully ignorant or purposely negligent in its handling of the situation, exposing tens of thousands of people to unsafe water. Over the past year, the water supply has been switched back to Detroit water, lawsuits have been filed, and officials have been charged, but contaminated water is still an issue. FiveThirtyEight, in its end-of-the-year awards, recognizes the man who blew this story wide open.

It’s the Cold War 2.0. On Thursday, the Obama administration announced new measures against Russia for its role in the alleged interference with this year’s presidential election. The measures include sanctions against multiple Russian agencies, including the spy agency that succeeded the KGB, the expulsion of 35 Russian operatives from the country, and the closing of two Russian-owned facilities on the East Coast. Early Friday morning, Russian officials shot back that they would recommend the expulsion of 35 American diplomats in their country, which is as petty as it sounds. While all of this may amount to a penis-measuring contest between the two countries, a recent story in The New Yorker about how the United States almost accidentally initiated a nuclear attack against the Soviet Union in the 1980s should give us all pause.

The Greek Freak is about to get paid … in five years. I won’t bog you down with the confusing numbers and terminology of the new collective bargaining agreement the NBA owners and players recently agreed to, but I will tell you that (no bias here) versatile forward and fan favorite Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks, for his next contract in 2021 (he just signed an extension in September), could nab a deal worth $240 million if he stays with his current team. That’s multiple-time MVP winners Stephen Curry and LeBron James money. Here’s to more dunks, struts and amazing stories from The Greek Freak for many years.


Winner of Thursday: rapper album sales

When a mixtape based on a Broadway play can sell almost 200,000 units in its first week, that means it was a good year for music. Complex runs down the first-week numbers for some of the most talked about albums in 2016.

Loser of Thursday: Simon & Schuster

The New York-based publishing company reportedly offered Breitbart editor and white nationalist Milo Yiannopoulos a book deal worth $250,000. Yiannopoulos, who was famously axed from Twitter after he incited a swarm of hateful and violent messages toward Ghostbusters star Leslie Jones, was a key agitator during the misogynist “Gamergate” controversy of 2014. The deal is not too surprising, though, considering Simon & Schuster has published the works of Donald Trump, Dick Cheney and Glenn Beck in the past.

What to look forward to this weekend: Driving safely

This weekend is New Year’s Eve, which means there will be a lot of alcohol and too much drinking and driving. Stay safe out there. AAA probably provides assistance in your area.

Daily Dose: 12/27/16

President Obama says he could have beaten Donald Trump in the November election

11:00 AMThis is my last day of Daily Dose, as Clinton Yates returns on Monday. It’s been a blast this week running down the most interesting and noteworthy stories. Let’s get to it.

It’s coming up on three years since the city of Flint, Michigan, switched its water supply to the lead-contaminated Flint River. During that time period, anywhere between 6,000 to 12,000 Flint children have been exposed to dangerous levels of lead, according to the United Way of Genesee County. Ever since problems began to arise with the water supply in the city, government officials in the state were either willfully ignorant or purposely negligent in its handling of the situation, exposing tens of thousands of people to unsafe water. Over the past year, the water supply has been switched back to Detroit water, lawsuits have been filed, and officials have been charged, but contaminated water is still an issue. FiveThirtyEight, in its end-of-the-year awards, recognizes the man who blew this story wide open.

It’s the Cold War 2.0. On Thursday, the Obama administration announced new measures against Russia for its role in the alleged interference with this year’s presidential election. The measures include sanctions against multiple Russian agencies, including the spy agency that succeeded the KGB, the expulsion of 35 Russian operatives from the country, and the closing of two Russian-owned facilities on the East Coast. Early Friday morning, Russian officials shot back that they would recommend the expulsion of 35 American diplomats in their country, which is as petty as it sounds. While all of this may amount to a penis-measuring contest between the two countries, a recent story in The New Yorker about how the United States almost accidentally initiated a nuclear attack against the Soviet Union in the 1980s should give us all pause.

The Greek Freak is about to get paid … in five years. I won’t bog you down with the confusing numbers and terminology of the new collective bargaining agreement the NBA owners and players recently agreed to, but I will tell you that (no bias here) versatile forward and fan favorite Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks, for his next contract in 2021 (he just signed an extension in September), could nab a deal worth $240 million if he stays with his current team. That’s multiple-time MVP winners Stephen Curry and LeBron James money. Here’s to more dunks, struts and amazing stories from The Greek Freak for many years.


Winner of Thursday: rapper album sales

When a mixtape based on a Broadway play can sell almost 200,000 units in its first week, that means it was a good year for music. Complex runs down the first-week numbers for some of the most talked about albums in 2016.

Loser of Thursday: Simon & Schuster

The New York-based publishing company reportedly offered Breitbart editor and white nationalist Milo Yiannopoulos a book deal worth $250,000. Yiannopoulos, who was famously axed from Twitter after he incited a swarm of hateful and violent messages toward Ghostbusters star Leslie Jones, was a key agitator during the misogynist “Gamergate” controversy of 2014. The deal is not too surprising, though, considering Simon & Schuster has published the works of Donald Trump, Dick Cheney and Glenn Beck in the past.

What to look forward to this weekend: Driving safely

This weekend is New Year’s Eve, which means there will be a lot of alcohol and too much drinking and driving. Stay safe out there. AAA probably provides assistance in your area.

Daily Dose: 12/26/16

George Michael dies at 53

11:00 AMThis is my last day of Daily Dose, as Clinton Yates returns on Monday. It’s been a blast this week running down the most interesting and noteworthy stories. Let’s get to it.

It’s coming up on three years since the city of Flint, Michigan, switched its water supply to the lead-contaminated Flint River. During that time period, anywhere between 6,000 to 12,000 Flint children have been exposed to dangerous levels of lead, according to the United Way of Genesee County. Ever since problems began to arise with the water supply in the city, government officials in the state were either willfully ignorant or purposely negligent in its handling of the situation, exposing tens of thousands of people to unsafe water. Over the past year, the water supply has been switched back to Detroit water, lawsuits have been filed, and officials have been charged, but contaminated water is still an issue. FiveThirtyEight, in its end-of-the-year awards, recognizes the man who blew this story wide open.

It’s the Cold War 2.0. On Thursday, the Obama administration announced new measures against Russia for its role in the alleged interference with this year’s presidential election. The measures include sanctions against multiple Russian agencies, including the spy agency that succeeded the KGB, the expulsion of 35 Russian operatives from the country, and the closing of two Russian-owned facilities on the East Coast. Early Friday morning, Russian officials shot back that they would recommend the expulsion of 35 American diplomats in their country, which is as petty as it sounds. While all of this may amount to a penis-measuring contest between the two countries, a recent story in The New Yorker about how the United States almost accidentally initiated a nuclear attack against the Soviet Union in the 1980s should give us all pause.

The Greek Freak is about to get paid … in five years. I won’t bog you down with the confusing numbers and terminology of the new collective bargaining agreement the NBA owners and players recently agreed to, but I will tell you that (no bias here) versatile forward and fan favorite Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks, for his next contract in 2021 (he just signed an extension in September), could nab a deal worth $240 million if he stays with his current team. That’s multiple-time MVP winners Stephen Curry and LeBron James money. Here’s to more dunks, struts and amazing stories from The Greek Freak for many years.


Winner of Thursday: rapper album sales

When a mixtape based on a Broadway play can sell almost 200,000 units in its first week, that means it was a good year for music. Complex runs down the first-week numbers for some of the most talked about albums in 2016.

Loser of Thursday: Simon & Schuster

The New York-based publishing company reportedly offered Breitbart editor and white nationalist Milo Yiannopoulos a book deal worth $250,000. Yiannopoulos, who was famously axed from Twitter after he incited a swarm of hateful and violent messages toward Ghostbusters star Leslie Jones, was a key agitator during the misogynist “Gamergate” controversy of 2014. The deal is not too surprising, though, considering Simon & Schuster has published the works of Donald Trump, Dick Cheney and Glenn Beck in the past.

What to look forward to this weekend: Driving safely

This weekend is New Year’s Eve, which means there will be a lot of alcohol and too much drinking and driving. Stay safe out there. AAA probably provides assistance in your area.