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Dave Chappelle’s opening ‘Saturday Night Live’ monologue was pitch perfect

There was really nobody else for the job

3:21 PMWhen news was first announced that Dave Chappelle would be hosting NBC’s Saturday Night Live on Nov. 12, longtime fans rejoiced. The man who shaped television comedy for a certain generation of viewers was going to be hosting the first episode of the sketch comedy program of record in the U.S., at least since his own Chappelle’s Show ended 10 years ago. With A Tribe Called Quest as the musical guest, it was like this throwback boom-bap card that reminded us all of what we once loved so much about our culture.

Then, two things happened. First, at a comedy show in New York City, Chappelle decided to share his thoughts about the then-upcoming election. He spoke ill of Hillary Clinton and seemingly defended Donald Trump’s remarks about sexual assault, a situation that got NBC’s Billy Bush fired. Then Trump got elected.

So, with a decidedly different timbre to the evening than many expected, the man who brought us “Black Bush” stepped to the stage and delivered a monologue that simultaneously reminded us why he is and isn’t on television anymore. “I didn’t know that Donald Trump was going to win the election,” Chappelle started. “I did suspect it. Seemed like Hillary was doing well in the polls, and yet, I know the whites. You guys aren’t as full of surprises as you used to be.”

To quote a famous man, it’s funny, because it’s true.

In the rest of the monologue, Chappelle described how different he feels America is now, in a way that garnered uncomfortable laughs from the crowd. The jokes went everywhere from the Islamic State group to #BlackLivesMatter to what it’s like to be rich. He even dropped a couple of N-bombs, just to remind you of how it was when he was at the helm. Chappelle was Chappelle in a way we hadn’t seen live in what seemed like forever.

Once the episode started, however, people weren’t so pleased. The program spent an inordinate amount of time lampooning Trump, as if the coverage were a separate matter from his popularity around the country, and they somehow were not a part of the media machine that built a 70-year-old man with zero experience in politics into commander in chief.

Saturday Night Live‘s ‘Hallelujah’ opening was a bunch of B.S. You don’t get to enable Donald Trump into the presidency and then cry when it happens,” the headline at Cosmopolitan read. “The show tried to tug at liberal America’s heartstrings, but its normalization of Donald Trump won’t be forgotten,” the sub-head at MTV.com read.

In a strange way, it became clear that Chappelle was the perfect person for this particular slot on this particular day with this particular result. Anyone else would have simply not had the gravitas to address the scenario, with a black man leaving the office and a reality TV star coming in. The humor was uncomfortable because that’s what the situation called for. It’s a lot easier to laugh at a joke about Obama being “stereotypically black” when you don’t think all the work he did in office might potentially be undone. Alas.

One of the most poignant moments of his nearly 12-minute monologue came via a sobering reminder of where we once were regarding electoral politics in this country. You’ve heard his old joke about not being the first black president, due to assassination threats. But this time around, he wasn’t kidding at all.

“I don’t know what he’s gonna do. But I know Obama did a good job. Obama did a good job,” Chappelle said. “I think we’ll all miss him when he’s gone. Do you agree with this? And thank God he lived to tell about it.” Chappelle’s strength has always been his ability to create a laugh out of something that’s not really funny at all. On Saturday, America needed that and Chappelle’s monologue delivered.

Whether or not this country can continue to laugh for the next four years, however, is a different matter.

Daily Dose: 11/11/16

Protests continue as Trump makes first visit to White House as president-elect

3:21 PMWhen news was first announced that Dave Chappelle would be hosting NBC’s Saturday Night Live on Nov. 12, longtime fans rejoiced. The man who shaped television comedy for a certain generation of viewers was going to be hosting the first episode of the sketch comedy program of record in the U.S., at least since his own Chappelle’s Show ended 10 years ago. With A Tribe Called Quest as the musical guest, it was like this throwback boom-bap card that reminded us all of what we once loved so much about our culture.

Then, two things happened. First, at a comedy show in New York City, Chappelle decided to share his thoughts about the then-upcoming election. He spoke ill of Hillary Clinton and seemingly defended Donald Trump’s remarks about sexual assault, a situation that got NBC’s Billy Bush fired. Then Trump got elected.

So, with a decidedly different timbre to the evening than many expected, the man who brought us “Black Bush” stepped to the stage and delivered a monologue that simultaneously reminded us why he is and isn’t on television anymore. “I didn’t know that Donald Trump was going to win the election,” Chappelle started. “I did suspect it. Seemed like Hillary was doing well in the polls, and yet, I know the whites. You guys aren’t as full of surprises as you used to be.”

To quote a famous man, it’s funny, because it’s true.

In the rest of the monologue, Chappelle described how different he feels America is now, in a way that garnered uncomfortable laughs from the crowd. The jokes went everywhere from the Islamic State group to #BlackLivesMatter to what it’s like to be rich. He even dropped a couple of N-bombs, just to remind you of how it was when he was at the helm. Chappelle was Chappelle in a way we hadn’t seen live in what seemed like forever.

Once the episode started, however, people weren’t so pleased. The program spent an inordinate amount of time lampooning Trump, as if the coverage were a separate matter from his popularity around the country, and they somehow were not a part of the media machine that built a 70-year-old man with zero experience in politics into commander in chief.

Saturday Night Live‘s ‘Hallelujah’ opening was a bunch of B.S. You don’t get to enable Donald Trump into the presidency and then cry when it happens,” the headline at Cosmopolitan read. “The show tried to tug at liberal America’s heartstrings, but its normalization of Donald Trump won’t be forgotten,” the sub-head at MTV.com read.

In a strange way, it became clear that Chappelle was the perfect person for this particular slot on this particular day with this particular result. Anyone else would have simply not had the gravitas to address the scenario, with a black man leaving the office and a reality TV star coming in. The humor was uncomfortable because that’s what the situation called for. It’s a lot easier to laugh at a joke about Obama being “stereotypically black” when you don’t think all the work he did in office might potentially be undone. Alas.

One of the most poignant moments of his nearly 12-minute monologue came via a sobering reminder of where we once were regarding electoral politics in this country. You’ve heard his old joke about not being the first black president, due to assassination threats. But this time around, he wasn’t kidding at all.

“I don’t know what he’s gonna do. But I know Obama did a good job. Obama did a good job,” Chappelle said. “I think we’ll all miss him when he’s gone. Do you agree with this? And thank God he lived to tell about it.” Chappelle’s strength has always been his ability to create a laugh out of something that’s not really funny at all. On Saturday, America needed that and Chappelle’s monologue delivered.

Whether or not this country can continue to laugh for the next four years, however, is a different matter.

Donald Glover’s heat rock of 2016 continues

His new track, ‘Me and Your Mama’ is incredible

3:21 PMWhen news was first announced that Dave Chappelle would be hosting NBC’s Saturday Night Live on Nov. 12, longtime fans rejoiced. The man who shaped television comedy for a certain generation of viewers was going to be hosting the first episode of the sketch comedy program of record in the U.S., at least since his own Chappelle’s Show ended 10 years ago. With A Tribe Called Quest as the musical guest, it was like this throwback boom-bap card that reminded us all of what we once loved so much about our culture.

Then, two things happened. First, at a comedy show in New York City, Chappelle decided to share his thoughts about the then-upcoming election. He spoke ill of Hillary Clinton and seemingly defended Donald Trump’s remarks about sexual assault, a situation that got NBC’s Billy Bush fired. Then Trump got elected.

So, with a decidedly different timbre to the evening than many expected, the man who brought us “Black Bush” stepped to the stage and delivered a monologue that simultaneously reminded us why he is and isn’t on television anymore. “I didn’t know that Donald Trump was going to win the election,” Chappelle started. “I did suspect it. Seemed like Hillary was doing well in the polls, and yet, I know the whites. You guys aren’t as full of surprises as you used to be.”

To quote a famous man, it’s funny, because it’s true.

In the rest of the monologue, Chappelle described how different he feels America is now, in a way that garnered uncomfortable laughs from the crowd. The jokes went everywhere from the Islamic State group to #BlackLivesMatter to what it’s like to be rich. He even dropped a couple of N-bombs, just to remind you of how it was when he was at the helm. Chappelle was Chappelle in a way we hadn’t seen live in what seemed like forever.

Once the episode started, however, people weren’t so pleased. The program spent an inordinate amount of time lampooning Trump, as if the coverage were a separate matter from his popularity around the country, and they somehow were not a part of the media machine that built a 70-year-old man with zero experience in politics into commander in chief.

Saturday Night Live‘s ‘Hallelujah’ opening was a bunch of B.S. You don’t get to enable Donald Trump into the presidency and then cry when it happens,” the headline at Cosmopolitan read. “The show tried to tug at liberal America’s heartstrings, but its normalization of Donald Trump won’t be forgotten,” the sub-head at MTV.com read.

In a strange way, it became clear that Chappelle was the perfect person for this particular slot on this particular day with this particular result. Anyone else would have simply not had the gravitas to address the scenario, with a black man leaving the office and a reality TV star coming in. The humor was uncomfortable because that’s what the situation called for. It’s a lot easier to laugh at a joke about Obama being “stereotypically black” when you don’t think all the work he did in office might potentially be undone. Alas.

One of the most poignant moments of his nearly 12-minute monologue came via a sobering reminder of where we once were regarding electoral politics in this country. You’ve heard his old joke about not being the first black president, due to assassination threats. But this time around, he wasn’t kidding at all.

“I don’t know what he’s gonna do. But I know Obama did a good job. Obama did a good job,” Chappelle said. “I think we’ll all miss him when he’s gone. Do you agree with this? And thank God he lived to tell about it.” Chappelle’s strength has always been his ability to create a laugh out of something that’s not really funny at all. On Saturday, America needed that and Chappelle’s monologue delivered.

Whether or not this country can continue to laugh for the next four years, however, is a different matter.

Stan Van Gundy is not here for Donald Trump

The NBA took another step toward progressivism via the Pistons coach

3:21 PMWhen news was first announced that Dave Chappelle would be hosting NBC’s Saturday Night Live on Nov. 12, longtime fans rejoiced. The man who shaped television comedy for a certain generation of viewers was going to be hosting the first episode of the sketch comedy program of record in the U.S., at least since his own Chappelle’s Show ended 10 years ago. With A Tribe Called Quest as the musical guest, it was like this throwback boom-bap card that reminded us all of what we once loved so much about our culture.

Then, two things happened. First, at a comedy show in New York City, Chappelle decided to share his thoughts about the then-upcoming election. He spoke ill of Hillary Clinton and seemingly defended Donald Trump’s remarks about sexual assault, a situation that got NBC’s Billy Bush fired. Then Trump got elected.

So, with a decidedly different timbre to the evening than many expected, the man who brought us “Black Bush” stepped to the stage and delivered a monologue that simultaneously reminded us why he is and isn’t on television anymore. “I didn’t know that Donald Trump was going to win the election,” Chappelle started. “I did suspect it. Seemed like Hillary was doing well in the polls, and yet, I know the whites. You guys aren’t as full of surprises as you used to be.”

To quote a famous man, it’s funny, because it’s true.

In the rest of the monologue, Chappelle described how different he feels America is now, in a way that garnered uncomfortable laughs from the crowd. The jokes went everywhere from the Islamic State group to #BlackLivesMatter to what it’s like to be rich. He even dropped a couple of N-bombs, just to remind you of how it was when he was at the helm. Chappelle was Chappelle in a way we hadn’t seen live in what seemed like forever.

Once the episode started, however, people weren’t so pleased. The program spent an inordinate amount of time lampooning Trump, as if the coverage were a separate matter from his popularity around the country, and they somehow were not a part of the media machine that built a 70-year-old man with zero experience in politics into commander in chief.

Saturday Night Live‘s ‘Hallelujah’ opening was a bunch of B.S. You don’t get to enable Donald Trump into the presidency and then cry when it happens,” the headline at Cosmopolitan read. “The show tried to tug at liberal America’s heartstrings, but its normalization of Donald Trump won’t be forgotten,” the sub-head at MTV.com read.

In a strange way, it became clear that Chappelle was the perfect person for this particular slot on this particular day with this particular result. Anyone else would have simply not had the gravitas to address the scenario, with a black man leaving the office and a reality TV star coming in. The humor was uncomfortable because that’s what the situation called for. It’s a lot easier to laugh at a joke about Obama being “stereotypically black” when you don’t think all the work he did in office might potentially be undone. Alas.

One of the most poignant moments of his nearly 12-minute monologue came via a sobering reminder of where we once were regarding electoral politics in this country. You’ve heard his old joke about not being the first black president, due to assassination threats. But this time around, he wasn’t kidding at all.

“I don’t know what he’s gonna do. But I know Obama did a good job. Obama did a good job,” Chappelle said. “I think we’ll all miss him when he’s gone. Do you agree with this? And thank God he lived to tell about it.” Chappelle’s strength has always been his ability to create a laugh out of something that’s not really funny at all. On Saturday, America needed that and Chappelle’s monologue delivered.

Whether or not this country can continue to laugh for the next four years, however, is a different matter.

Daily Dose: 11/10/16

President Obama set to meet with Donald Trump

3:21 PMWhen news was first announced that Dave Chappelle would be hosting NBC’s Saturday Night Live on Nov. 12, longtime fans rejoiced. The man who shaped television comedy for a certain generation of viewers was going to be hosting the first episode of the sketch comedy program of record in the U.S., at least since his own Chappelle’s Show ended 10 years ago. With A Tribe Called Quest as the musical guest, it was like this throwback boom-bap card that reminded us all of what we once loved so much about our culture.

Then, two things happened. First, at a comedy show in New York City, Chappelle decided to share his thoughts about the then-upcoming election. He spoke ill of Hillary Clinton and seemingly defended Donald Trump’s remarks about sexual assault, a situation that got NBC’s Billy Bush fired. Then Trump got elected.

So, with a decidedly different timbre to the evening than many expected, the man who brought us “Black Bush” stepped to the stage and delivered a monologue that simultaneously reminded us why he is and isn’t on television anymore. “I didn’t know that Donald Trump was going to win the election,” Chappelle started. “I did suspect it. Seemed like Hillary was doing well in the polls, and yet, I know the whites. You guys aren’t as full of surprises as you used to be.”

To quote a famous man, it’s funny, because it’s true.

In the rest of the monologue, Chappelle described how different he feels America is now, in a way that garnered uncomfortable laughs from the crowd. The jokes went everywhere from the Islamic State group to #BlackLivesMatter to what it’s like to be rich. He even dropped a couple of N-bombs, just to remind you of how it was when he was at the helm. Chappelle was Chappelle in a way we hadn’t seen live in what seemed like forever.

Once the episode started, however, people weren’t so pleased. The program spent an inordinate amount of time lampooning Trump, as if the coverage were a separate matter from his popularity around the country, and they somehow were not a part of the media machine that built a 70-year-old man with zero experience in politics into commander in chief.

Saturday Night Live‘s ‘Hallelujah’ opening was a bunch of B.S. You don’t get to enable Donald Trump into the presidency and then cry when it happens,” the headline at Cosmopolitan read. “The show tried to tug at liberal America’s heartstrings, but its normalization of Donald Trump won’t be forgotten,” the sub-head at MTV.com read.

In a strange way, it became clear that Chappelle was the perfect person for this particular slot on this particular day with this particular result. Anyone else would have simply not had the gravitas to address the scenario, with a black man leaving the office and a reality TV star coming in. The humor was uncomfortable because that’s what the situation called for. It’s a lot easier to laugh at a joke about Obama being “stereotypically black” when you don’t think all the work he did in office might potentially be undone. Alas.

One of the most poignant moments of his nearly 12-minute monologue came via a sobering reminder of where we once were regarding electoral politics in this country. You’ve heard his old joke about not being the first black president, due to assassination threats. But this time around, he wasn’t kidding at all.

“I don’t know what he’s gonna do. But I know Obama did a good job. Obama did a good job,” Chappelle said. “I think we’ll all miss him when he’s gone. Do you agree with this? And thank God he lived to tell about it.” Chappelle’s strength has always been his ability to create a laugh out of something that’s not really funny at all. On Saturday, America needed that and Chappelle’s monologue delivered.

Whether or not this country can continue to laugh for the next four years, however, is a different matter.

Daily Dose: 11/9/16

Donald Trump beats Hillary Clinton in race to White House

3:21 PMWhen news was first announced that Dave Chappelle would be hosting NBC’s Saturday Night Live on Nov. 12, longtime fans rejoiced. The man who shaped television comedy for a certain generation of viewers was going to be hosting the first episode of the sketch comedy program of record in the U.S., at least since his own Chappelle’s Show ended 10 years ago. With A Tribe Called Quest as the musical guest, it was like this throwback boom-bap card that reminded us all of what we once loved so much about our culture.

Then, two things happened. First, at a comedy show in New York City, Chappelle decided to share his thoughts about the then-upcoming election. He spoke ill of Hillary Clinton and seemingly defended Donald Trump’s remarks about sexual assault, a situation that got NBC’s Billy Bush fired. Then Trump got elected.

So, with a decidedly different timbre to the evening than many expected, the man who brought us “Black Bush” stepped to the stage and delivered a monologue that simultaneously reminded us why he is and isn’t on television anymore. “I didn’t know that Donald Trump was going to win the election,” Chappelle started. “I did suspect it. Seemed like Hillary was doing well in the polls, and yet, I know the whites. You guys aren’t as full of surprises as you used to be.”

To quote a famous man, it’s funny, because it’s true.

In the rest of the monologue, Chappelle described how different he feels America is now, in a way that garnered uncomfortable laughs from the crowd. The jokes went everywhere from the Islamic State group to #BlackLivesMatter to what it’s like to be rich. He even dropped a couple of N-bombs, just to remind you of how it was when he was at the helm. Chappelle was Chappelle in a way we hadn’t seen live in what seemed like forever.

Once the episode started, however, people weren’t so pleased. The program spent an inordinate amount of time lampooning Trump, as if the coverage were a separate matter from his popularity around the country, and they somehow were not a part of the media machine that built a 70-year-old man with zero experience in politics into commander in chief.

Saturday Night Live‘s ‘Hallelujah’ opening was a bunch of B.S. You don’t get to enable Donald Trump into the presidency and then cry when it happens,” the headline at Cosmopolitan read. “The show tried to tug at liberal America’s heartstrings, but its normalization of Donald Trump won’t be forgotten,” the sub-head at MTV.com read.

In a strange way, it became clear that Chappelle was the perfect person for this particular slot on this particular day with this particular result. Anyone else would have simply not had the gravitas to address the scenario, with a black man leaving the office and a reality TV star coming in. The humor was uncomfortable because that’s what the situation called for. It’s a lot easier to laugh at a joke about Obama being “stereotypically black” when you don’t think all the work he did in office might potentially be undone. Alas.

One of the most poignant moments of his nearly 12-minute monologue came via a sobering reminder of where we once were regarding electoral politics in this country. You’ve heard his old joke about not being the first black president, due to assassination threats. But this time around, he wasn’t kidding at all.

“I don’t know what he’s gonna do. But I know Obama did a good job. Obama did a good job,” Chappelle said. “I think we’ll all miss him when he’s gone. Do you agree with this? And thank God he lived to tell about it.” Chappelle’s strength has always been his ability to create a laugh out of something that’s not really funny at all. On Saturday, America needed that and Chappelle’s monologue delivered.

Whether or not this country can continue to laugh for the next four years, however, is a different matter.