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Doug Williams among HBCU legends in NFL Network documentary Friday night

‘Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL’ takes in-depth look at the legacy of 4 great players

4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”

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4:55 PMDoug Williams knows that when February rolls around, he’s got to keep his phone charged — ’cause e’rybody and their momma will be calling to get his thoughts on all things black, and definitely all things historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

“I think it’s a little old, especially for guys like myself,” said Williams, the Grambling State legend and Black College Football Hall of Fame inductee. “The older you get, you realize that it’s not about one month — it’s about 365 days a year. It’s not like we go into a cocoon after February is over with. We’re still around — still doing what we do. I get a lot of calls during [the month of February], and you hate to say, ‘No — I’m not gon’ do it,’ but my things is, I’m black in December too.”

This isn’t to say Williams, who just celebrated the 30th anniversary of Washington’s Super Bowl XXII victory over the Denver Broncos, feels burdened with carrying the torch for African-Americans during Black History Month or that he bemoans being every reporter’s go-to source when the topic is HBCUs. He understands that one month can never tell the full story.

“The reality is I can be gone every day in February — doing any number of Black History Month things,” said Williams, who was on his way to Atlanta for the Black College Football Hall of Fame induction festivities Saturday when he spoke to The Undefeated. “But February is also a big month for what I do in my day job – with the all-star games and getting ready for the draft and the combine. I just can’t pick up and go everywhere people want me to go,” continued Williams, a senior vice president of player personnel for the Redskins.

When Williams’ phone did ring toward the tail end of last season, and he was told he’d be interviewed for a one-hour documentary about NFL legends and groundbreakers who attended HBCUs, he was all too happy to participate. The process of getting the narrative right hasn’t always been easy, Williams noted.

“Every article in America was written about ‘The First Black quarterback,’ ‘Washington’s Black Quarterback,’ ‘The Way of the Black Quarterback,’ ” Williams told Raiders.com. “I didn’t go to the Super Bowl as a black quarterback. I went to the Super Bowl as the Redskins’ quarterback, who just happened to be black,” said Williams, the first African-American quarterback to start in a Super Bowl. “At the same time, I understood the pride, the dignity and the history of what was about to happen.”

Through interviews and profiles of four notable NFL HBCU alums — Williams, Jerry Rice, Mel Blount and Marquette King — Breaking Ground: A Story of HBCU Football and the NFL takes an in-depth look at the legacy of HBCUs within the league, airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST on NFL Network.

Breaking Ground centers on Blount’s trip back to Southern University, where he reflects on his time there with his son Akil and former teammates. The special also remembers Rice, a legend at Mississippi Valley State, Williams and the NFL’s only current black punter, Marquette King of the Oakland Raiders, who graduated from Fort Valley State and spoke about changing the way people view his position.

The documentary is narrated by Howard University alum and Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman.

Williams understands the importance of getting the story right, which is why he will continue to answer the phone.

“I understand this is our month,” Williams said with a chuckle before turning serious. “The sad part is knowing that the one month that they dedicate to people who’ve done so much for this country, a lot of schools don’t even want to teach that.”