What Had Happened Was Trending stories on the intersections of race, sports & culture

‘Hands up, don’t shoot’ didn’t make a difference for Terence Crutcher

Video footage shows another black life taken by police

12:12 PM“Hands up, don’t shoot!”

Since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, on Aug. 9, 2014, this phrase has become the unofficial slogan for the Black Lives Matter movement and stand against police brutality in America. Whether or not Brown actually mouthed the words “Don’t shoot!” before he was murdered is not really the point here. The point is this phrase represents the harsh reality that, as we’ve seen time and time again, even when an African-American is in compliance with police — even when hands are raised to the sky — a life is still in jeopardy.

Last Friday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old unarmed black man, had his hands up. A white police officer shot him. Crutcher was killed.

On Monday, the Tulsa Police Department released video footage of the moments leading up to Crutcher’s death. One video shows footage taken from the dashcam inside one of the police vehicles that responded to reports of an abandoned vehicle blocking a road. The other video shows footage from a surveillance helicopter.

WARNING: These videos contains graphic content and may be upsetting to some viewers.

[protected-iframe id=”871f625a9d293172d062ee209db7ab52-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658237″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

[protected-iframe id=”49eba938fe49aba0b1d795bca5c68a5e-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658240″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

Unlike in the police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile in July, the video captured was not taken by civilian bystanders. In the case of Crutcher’s murder, the videos are official police footage. “Looks like a bad dude, too,” you can hear one helicopter pilot say seconds before seeing Crutcher fall to the ground.

As horrific as it is to see yet another black man gunned down, there is a level of accountability that this police footage sheds light upon. Since the videos were released, the Tulsa Police Department has opened a criminal investigation into the shooting and the U.S. Department of Justice has launched a separate civil rights investigation.

To those who’ve questioned why San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick decided to kneel during The Star-Spangled Banner before football games, here’s your answer. Given the current racial climate of this country, why should Kaepernick stand for the national anthem? Especially after a black man stood in front of police, with his hands up, and his life was still taken.

New De La Soul documentary

from ‘Mass Appeal’ chronicles the group’s long journey

12:12 PM“Hands up, don’t shoot!”

Since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, on Aug. 9, 2014, this phrase has become the unofficial slogan for the Black Lives Matter movement and stand against police brutality in America. Whether or not Brown actually mouthed the words “Don’t shoot!” before he was murdered is not really the point here. The point is this phrase represents the harsh reality that, as we’ve seen time and time again, even when an African-American is in compliance with police — even when hands are raised to the sky — a life is still in jeopardy.

Last Friday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old unarmed black man, had his hands up. A white police officer shot him. Crutcher was killed.

On Monday, the Tulsa Police Department released video footage of the moments leading up to Crutcher’s death. One video shows footage taken from the dashcam inside one of the police vehicles that responded to reports of an abandoned vehicle blocking a road. The other video shows footage from a surveillance helicopter.

WARNING: These videos contains graphic content and may be upsetting to some viewers.

[protected-iframe id=”871f625a9d293172d062ee209db7ab52-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658237″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

[protected-iframe id=”49eba938fe49aba0b1d795bca5c68a5e-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658240″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

Unlike in the police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile in July, the video captured was not taken by civilian bystanders. In the case of Crutcher’s murder, the videos are official police footage. “Looks like a bad dude, too,” you can hear one helicopter pilot say seconds before seeing Crutcher fall to the ground.

As horrific as it is to see yet another black man gunned down, there is a level of accountability that this police footage sheds light upon. Since the videos were released, the Tulsa Police Department has opened a criminal investigation into the shooting and the U.S. Department of Justice has launched a separate civil rights investigation.

To those who’ve questioned why San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick decided to kneel during The Star-Spangled Banner before football games, here’s your answer. Given the current racial climate of this country, why should Kaepernick stand for the national anthem? Especially after a black man stood in front of police, with his hands up, and his life was still taken.

What is #TheRealAU

Black students at American University set to protest racist treatment on campus

12:12 PM“Hands up, don’t shoot!”

Since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, on Aug. 9, 2014, this phrase has become the unofficial slogan for the Black Lives Matter movement and stand against police brutality in America. Whether or not Brown actually mouthed the words “Don’t shoot!” before he was murdered is not really the point here. The point is this phrase represents the harsh reality that, as we’ve seen time and time again, even when an African-American is in compliance with police — even when hands are raised to the sky — a life is still in jeopardy.

Last Friday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old unarmed black man, had his hands up. A white police officer shot him. Crutcher was killed.

On Monday, the Tulsa Police Department released video footage of the moments leading up to Crutcher’s death. One video shows footage taken from the dashcam inside one of the police vehicles that responded to reports of an abandoned vehicle blocking a road. The other video shows footage from a surveillance helicopter.

WARNING: These videos contains graphic content and may be upsetting to some viewers.

[protected-iframe id=”871f625a9d293172d062ee209db7ab52-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658237″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

[protected-iframe id=”49eba938fe49aba0b1d795bca5c68a5e-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658240″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

Unlike in the police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile in July, the video captured was not taken by civilian bystanders. In the case of Crutcher’s murder, the videos are official police footage. “Looks like a bad dude, too,” you can hear one helicopter pilot say seconds before seeing Crutcher fall to the ground.

As horrific as it is to see yet another black man gunned down, there is a level of accountability that this police footage sheds light upon. Since the videos were released, the Tulsa Police Department has opened a criminal investigation into the shooting and the U.S. Department of Justice has launched a separate civil rights investigation.

To those who’ve questioned why San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick decided to kneel during The Star-Spangled Banner before football games, here’s your answer. Given the current racial climate of this country, why should Kaepernick stand for the national anthem? Especially after a black man stood in front of police, with his hands up, and his life was still taken.

Daily Dose: 9/19/16

Suspect in custody following New York City explosion

12:12 PM“Hands up, don’t shoot!”

Since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, on Aug. 9, 2014, this phrase has become the unofficial slogan for the Black Lives Matter movement and stand against police brutality in America. Whether or not Brown actually mouthed the words “Don’t shoot!” before he was murdered is not really the point here. The point is this phrase represents the harsh reality that, as we’ve seen time and time again, even when an African-American is in compliance with police — even when hands are raised to the sky — a life is still in jeopardy.

Last Friday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old unarmed black man, had his hands up. A white police officer shot him. Crutcher was killed.

On Monday, the Tulsa Police Department released video footage of the moments leading up to Crutcher’s death. One video shows footage taken from the dashcam inside one of the police vehicles that responded to reports of an abandoned vehicle blocking a road. The other video shows footage from a surveillance helicopter.

WARNING: These videos contains graphic content and may be upsetting to some viewers.

[protected-iframe id=”871f625a9d293172d062ee209db7ab52-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658237″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

[protected-iframe id=”49eba938fe49aba0b1d795bca5c68a5e-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658240″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

Unlike in the police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile in July, the video captured was not taken by civilian bystanders. In the case of Crutcher’s murder, the videos are official police footage. “Looks like a bad dude, too,” you can hear one helicopter pilot say seconds before seeing Crutcher fall to the ground.

As horrific as it is to see yet another black man gunned down, there is a level of accountability that this police footage sheds light upon. Since the videos were released, the Tulsa Police Department has opened a criminal investigation into the shooting and the U.S. Department of Justice has launched a separate civil rights investigation.

To those who’ve questioned why San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick decided to kneel during The Star-Spangled Banner before football games, here’s your answer. Given the current racial climate of this country, why should Kaepernick stand for the national anthem? Especially after a black man stood in front of police, with his hands up, and his life was still taken.

Daily Dose: 9/16/16

Step right up, get your iPhones

12:12 PM“Hands up, don’t shoot!”

Since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, on Aug. 9, 2014, this phrase has become the unofficial slogan for the Black Lives Matter movement and stand against police brutality in America. Whether or not Brown actually mouthed the words “Don’t shoot!” before he was murdered is not really the point here. The point is this phrase represents the harsh reality that, as we’ve seen time and time again, even when an African-American is in compliance with police — even when hands are raised to the sky — a life is still in jeopardy.

Last Friday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old unarmed black man, had his hands up. A white police officer shot him. Crutcher was killed.

On Monday, the Tulsa Police Department released video footage of the moments leading up to Crutcher’s death. One video shows footage taken from the dashcam inside one of the police vehicles that responded to reports of an abandoned vehicle blocking a road. The other video shows footage from a surveillance helicopter.

WARNING: These videos contains graphic content and may be upsetting to some viewers.

[protected-iframe id=”871f625a9d293172d062ee209db7ab52-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658237″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

[protected-iframe id=”49eba938fe49aba0b1d795bca5c68a5e-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658240″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

Unlike in the police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile in July, the video captured was not taken by civilian bystanders. In the case of Crutcher’s murder, the videos are official police footage. “Looks like a bad dude, too,” you can hear one helicopter pilot say seconds before seeing Crutcher fall to the ground.

As horrific as it is to see yet another black man gunned down, there is a level of accountability that this police footage sheds light upon. Since the videos were released, the Tulsa Police Department has opened a criminal investigation into the shooting and the U.S. Department of Justice has launched a separate civil rights investigation.

To those who’ve questioned why San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick decided to kneel during The Star-Spangled Banner before football games, here’s your answer. Given the current racial climate of this country, why should Kaepernick stand for the national anthem? Especially after a black man stood in front of police, with his hands up, and his life was still taken.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is beyond real

and it might be too much for some people to handle

12:12 PM“Hands up, don’t shoot!”

Since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, on Aug. 9, 2014, this phrase has become the unofficial slogan for the Black Lives Matter movement and stand against police brutality in America. Whether or not Brown actually mouthed the words “Don’t shoot!” before he was murdered is not really the point here. The point is this phrase represents the harsh reality that, as we’ve seen time and time again, even when an African-American is in compliance with police — even when hands are raised to the sky — a life is still in jeopardy.

Last Friday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old unarmed black man, had his hands up. A white police officer shot him. Crutcher was killed.

On Monday, the Tulsa Police Department released video footage of the moments leading up to Crutcher’s death. One video shows footage taken from the dashcam inside one of the police vehicles that responded to reports of an abandoned vehicle blocking a road. The other video shows footage from a surveillance helicopter.

WARNING: These videos contains graphic content and may be upsetting to some viewers.

[protected-iframe id=”871f625a9d293172d062ee209db7ab52-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658237″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

[protected-iframe id=”49eba938fe49aba0b1d795bca5c68a5e-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658240″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

Unlike in the police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile in July, the video captured was not taken by civilian bystanders. In the case of Crutcher’s murder, the videos are official police footage. “Looks like a bad dude, too,” you can hear one helicopter pilot say seconds before seeing Crutcher fall to the ground.

As horrific as it is to see yet another black man gunned down, there is a level of accountability that this police footage sheds light upon. Since the videos were released, the Tulsa Police Department has opened a criminal investigation into the shooting and the U.S. Department of Justice has launched a separate civil rights investigation.

To those who’ve questioned why San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick decided to kneel during The Star-Spangled Banner before football games, here’s your answer. Given the current racial climate of this country, why should Kaepernick stand for the national anthem? Especially after a black man stood in front of police, with his hands up, and his life was still taken.

Daily Dose: 9/15/16

America’s black history museum is ready for its close-up

12:12 PM“Hands up, don’t shoot!”

Since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, on Aug. 9, 2014, this phrase has become the unofficial slogan for the Black Lives Matter movement and stand against police brutality in America. Whether or not Brown actually mouthed the words “Don’t shoot!” before he was murdered is not really the point here. The point is this phrase represents the harsh reality that, as we’ve seen time and time again, even when an African-American is in compliance with police — even when hands are raised to the sky — a life is still in jeopardy.

Last Friday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old unarmed black man, had his hands up. A white police officer shot him. Crutcher was killed.

On Monday, the Tulsa Police Department released video footage of the moments leading up to Crutcher’s death. One video shows footage taken from the dashcam inside one of the police vehicles that responded to reports of an abandoned vehicle blocking a road. The other video shows footage from a surveillance helicopter.

WARNING: These videos contains graphic content and may be upsetting to some viewers.

[protected-iframe id=”871f625a9d293172d062ee209db7ab52-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658237″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

[protected-iframe id=”49eba938fe49aba0b1d795bca5c68a5e-84028368-102718441″ info=”https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004658240″ width=”480″ height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ scrolling=”no”]

Unlike in the police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile in July, the video captured was not taken by civilian bystanders. In the case of Crutcher’s murder, the videos are official police footage. “Looks like a bad dude, too,” you can hear one helicopter pilot say seconds before seeing Crutcher fall to the ground.

As horrific as it is to see yet another black man gunned down, there is a level of accountability that this police footage sheds light upon. Since the videos were released, the Tulsa Police Department has opened a criminal investigation into the shooting and the U.S. Department of Justice has launched a separate civil rights investigation.

To those who’ve questioned why San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick decided to kneel during The Star-Spangled Banner before football games, here’s your answer. Given the current racial climate of this country, why should Kaepernick stand for the national anthem? Especially after a black man stood in front of police, with his hands up, and his life was still taken.