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LeBron James is not impressed with your shenanigans

Celtics fans burn Isaiah Thomas’ jersey after trade to Cavs

3:26 PMhttps://twitter.com/kylegordon28/status/900146707295596544

There’s something so specifically stupid about jersey burning that makes it universally accepted as the single most pathetic and idiotic form of fan protest there is. A player does something you don’t like — or, in this case, moves on from a team through no choice of his own — so you set fire to the piece of clothing you bought with his name on it. Brilliant.

Over the years, the practice has turned into something that exists in the same universe as what we’ll call “face painters.” One step too far for even the hard-core sports fans, just a demonstrative display that ultimately only makes the person involved look silly. So when the Boston Celtics’ general manager decided he wanted to trade fan favorite Isaiah Thomas (and a gazillion other things) to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Kyrie Irving, some fans uploaded a couple of videos of themselves burning Thomas jerseys. LeBron James was not happy about that.

So he tweeted his displeasure. Here they are, in reverse chronological order, because if I have to explain to you how Twitter works, then this isn’t the story for you anyway.

via Twitter

To be fair, clearly the two doing this are children, basically. That much is clear. But motivating James to create a further bond with the very guy who gave everything he had to that franchise, AND now he’s on the team that pummeled the Celtics by nearly 50 in an Eastern Conference semifinal in Boston? Dumb.

We know that this doesn’t represent every single Celtics fan, clearly. But for a town that’s already got an awful reputation regarding how it feels about certain athletes, this is a really bad look.

Daily Dose

Daily Dose: 8/22/17

BuzzFeed publishes more on R. Kelly

3:26 PMhttps://twitter.com/kylegordon28/status/900146707295596544

There’s something so specifically stupid about jersey burning that makes it universally accepted as the single most pathetic and idiotic form of fan protest there is. A player does something you don’t like — or, in this case, moves on from a team through no choice of his own — so you set fire to the piece of clothing you bought with his name on it. Brilliant.

Over the years, the practice has turned into something that exists in the same universe as what we’ll call “face painters.” One step too far for even the hard-core sports fans, just a demonstrative display that ultimately only makes the person involved look silly. So when the Boston Celtics’ general manager decided he wanted to trade fan favorite Isaiah Thomas (and a gazillion other things) to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Kyrie Irving, some fans uploaded a couple of videos of themselves burning Thomas jerseys. LeBron James was not happy about that.

So he tweeted his displeasure. Here they are, in reverse chronological order, because if I have to explain to you how Twitter works, then this isn’t the story for you anyway.

via Twitter

To be fair, clearly the two doing this are children, basically. That much is clear. But motivating James to create a further bond with the very guy who gave everything he had to that franchise, AND now he’s on the team that pummeled the Celtics by nearly 50 in an Eastern Conference semifinal in Boston? Dumb.

We know that this doesn’t represent every single Celtics fan, clearly. But for a town that’s already got an awful reputation regarding how it feels about certain athletes, this is a really bad look.

Jay-Z supports Big Baller Brand

and says he bought three pairs of the sneakers

3:26 PMhttps://twitter.com/kylegordon28/status/900146707295596544

There’s something so specifically stupid about jersey burning that makes it universally accepted as the single most pathetic and idiotic form of fan protest there is. A player does something you don’t like — or, in this case, moves on from a team through no choice of his own — so you set fire to the piece of clothing you bought with his name on it. Brilliant.

Over the years, the practice has turned into something that exists in the same universe as what we’ll call “face painters.” One step too far for even the hard-core sports fans, just a demonstrative display that ultimately only makes the person involved look silly. So when the Boston Celtics’ general manager decided he wanted to trade fan favorite Isaiah Thomas (and a gazillion other things) to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Kyrie Irving, some fans uploaded a couple of videos of themselves burning Thomas jerseys. LeBron James was not happy about that.

So he tweeted his displeasure. Here they are, in reverse chronological order, because if I have to explain to you how Twitter works, then this isn’t the story for you anyway.

via Twitter

To be fair, clearly the two doing this are children, basically. That much is clear. But motivating James to create a further bond with the very guy who gave everything he had to that franchise, AND now he’s on the team that pummeled the Celtics by nearly 50 in an Eastern Conference semifinal in Boston? Dumb.

We know that this doesn’t represent every single Celtics fan, clearly. But for a town that’s already got an awful reputation regarding how it feels about certain athletes, this is a really bad look.

Lil Yachty takes off at Flight Club

Complex’s latest ‘Sneaker Shopping’ episode is great

3:26 PMhttps://twitter.com/kylegordon28/status/900146707295596544

There’s something so specifically stupid about jersey burning that makes it universally accepted as the single most pathetic and idiotic form of fan protest there is. A player does something you don’t like — or, in this case, moves on from a team through no choice of his own — so you set fire to the piece of clothing you bought with his name on it. Brilliant.

Over the years, the practice has turned into something that exists in the same universe as what we’ll call “face painters.” One step too far for even the hard-core sports fans, just a demonstrative display that ultimately only makes the person involved look silly. So when the Boston Celtics’ general manager decided he wanted to trade fan favorite Isaiah Thomas (and a gazillion other things) to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Kyrie Irving, some fans uploaded a couple of videos of themselves burning Thomas jerseys. LeBron James was not happy about that.

So he tweeted his displeasure. Here they are, in reverse chronological order, because if I have to explain to you how Twitter works, then this isn’t the story for you anyway.

via Twitter

To be fair, clearly the two doing this are children, basically. That much is clear. But motivating James to create a further bond with the very guy who gave everything he had to that franchise, AND now he’s on the team that pummeled the Celtics by nearly 50 in an Eastern Conference semifinal in Boston? Dumb.

We know that this doesn’t represent every single Celtics fan, clearly. But for a town that’s already got an awful reputation regarding how it feels about certain athletes, this is a really bad look.

The Morning Roast: 8/20/17

National anthem protests and a whole lotta baseball

The Undefeated

11:16 AMClinton managed to actually make it to the first hour of the show this time around, so all three members of the gang were around this week.

Hour 1

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While all sorts of teams are finding themselves with players looking to protest the national anthem in one way or the other, we tend to forget the NFL relaxed its on-field celebration rules this offseason too. Which means that we just might see a situation in which you get a team full of dudes after a touchdown doing something America isn’t ready for. Like a black power fist.

Otherwise, the crew talked about the potential for the NFL players to strike and the city of Boston’s reaction to Red Sox owner John Henry looking to rename Yawkey Way behind Fenway Park, and Clinton recapped his last week hosting The Dan Le Batard Show, in which he interviewed three contestants from The Bachelorette.

Hour 2

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The highlight of the hour was ESPN analyst and former NFL coach Herm Edwards joining us from Bristol, Connecticut. We talked about all the young quarterbacks around the league and their struggles, and Coach pointed out that Washington’s NFL franchise is basically completely doomed.

Other than that, Domonique decided to drop a huge f-bomb on the show previously, and we now have a new thing to call the show: the clean bathroom of ESPN Radio.

Hour 3

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If you don’t know, Clinton was a pretty serious baseball player in his youth, so the Little League World Series is a big deal in his world for obvious reasons. After explaining all that to the squad, they talked to ESPN MLB Radio analyst Chris Singleton about the MLB Little League Classic, the Sunday Night Baseball game between the Cardinals and Pirates. A big league game in a minor league park is a great idea, and it was even more interesting to watch.

We also talked about the baseball umpires standing up in solidarity to verbal abuse, which led to a whole other discussion about whether they are needed at all in the game. Clinton took a very different stance from Domonique and Mina.

Enjoy!

Daily Dose: 8/21/17

Dick Gregory’s legacy is more than just as a comedian

3:26 PMhttps://twitter.com/kylegordon28/status/900146707295596544

There’s something so specifically stupid about jersey burning that makes it universally accepted as the single most pathetic and idiotic form of fan protest there is. A player does something you don’t like — or, in this case, moves on from a team through no choice of his own — so you set fire to the piece of clothing you bought with his name on it. Brilliant.

Over the years, the practice has turned into something that exists in the same universe as what we’ll call “face painters.” One step too far for even the hard-core sports fans, just a demonstrative display that ultimately only makes the person involved look silly. So when the Boston Celtics’ general manager decided he wanted to trade fan favorite Isaiah Thomas (and a gazillion other things) to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Kyrie Irving, some fans uploaded a couple of videos of themselves burning Thomas jerseys. LeBron James was not happy about that.

So he tweeted his displeasure. Here they are, in reverse chronological order, because if I have to explain to you how Twitter works, then this isn’t the story for you anyway.

via Twitter

To be fair, clearly the two doing this are children, basically. That much is clear. But motivating James to create a further bond with the very guy who gave everything he had to that franchise, AND now he’s on the team that pummeled the Celtics by nearly 50 in an Eastern Conference semifinal in Boston? Dumb.

We know that this doesn’t represent every single Celtics fan, clearly. But for a town that’s already got an awful reputation regarding how it feels about certain athletes, this is a really bad look.

Daily Dose: 8/18/17

Tina Fey wants to let us all eat cake

3:26 PMhttps://twitter.com/kylegordon28/status/900146707295596544

There’s something so specifically stupid about jersey burning that makes it universally accepted as the single most pathetic and idiotic form of fan protest there is. A player does something you don’t like — or, in this case, moves on from a team through no choice of his own — so you set fire to the piece of clothing you bought with his name on it. Brilliant.

Over the years, the practice has turned into something that exists in the same universe as what we’ll call “face painters.” One step too far for even the hard-core sports fans, just a demonstrative display that ultimately only makes the person involved look silly. So when the Boston Celtics’ general manager decided he wanted to trade fan favorite Isaiah Thomas (and a gazillion other things) to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Kyrie Irving, some fans uploaded a couple of videos of themselves burning Thomas jerseys. LeBron James was not happy about that.

So he tweeted his displeasure. Here they are, in reverse chronological order, because if I have to explain to you how Twitter works, then this isn’t the story for you anyway.

via Twitter

To be fair, clearly the two doing this are children, basically. That much is clear. But motivating James to create a further bond with the very guy who gave everything he had to that franchise, AND now he’s on the team that pummeled the Celtics by nearly 50 in an Eastern Conference semifinal in Boston? Dumb.

We know that this doesn’t represent every single Celtics fan, clearly. But for a town that’s already got an awful reputation regarding how it feels about certain athletes, this is a really bad look.