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New Tupac biopic trailer is haunting

The Benny Boom-directed movie is set for a November release

5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.

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5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.

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5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.

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5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.

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5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.

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5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.

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5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.

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5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.

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5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.

Daily Dose: 9/8/16

Ryan Lochte gets his comeuppance

5:45 PMThe day that Tupac Shakur died, the rap world was forever changed, obviously. But the moment itself happened in a different way. It was 20 years ago, at a time when 24-hour news was still in what we’ll call its teenage phase of its now fully formed adult life span. If you weren’t sitting by a radio or a television, you likely didn’t find out about the murder until you ran into someone who was a hip-hop fan.

There was something instantly spooky about the whole deal. It was Friday the 13th. Early evening on the East Coast, mid-afternoon on the West Coast. Even though he had a song titled To Live and Die in L.A., Tupac’s demise came in Las Vegas. It was a situation that instantly led to rampant speculation that decades later still hasn’t ended. The notion of Tupac not really being dead was something that some respectable people took sort of seriously for longer than you think.

All that said, imagine being at an actual rap show when you found out that the genre’s biggest star had died. This video is of Ed Lover, who was then at the height of his power as the host of both Yo! MTV Raps and HOT 97’s morning show on New York radio. For him to jump on stage and stop a show, a Nas concert at that, is a sight to behold.

There’s so much going on in this video. We’re not going to take any time talking about Nas’ red leather overalls — it was prime Esco season — but his pacing around the stage is telling. Who knows what could be going on in his head in such a moment. Ed gets right to it in an informative and direct manner.

“At 7:03 p.m. New York time and 4:03 p.m. Las Vegas time, Tupac Shakur passed away, y’all,” he says. “Give me a moment of silence.” The rest involves him explaining his love for hip-hop, his respect for ‘Pac and general desire for humanity. But in retrospect, this is borderline amazing. People sort of scream in horror, but mostly are stunned. Then they take a moment of silence. This could have gone much more poorly. Never mind a potential crowd panic, but Ed and ‘Pac were legit tight. Imagine having to tell a crowd full of people that your friend had just passed. Haunting.

Which brings us to the latest trailer for the 2016 Tupac biopic All Eyez On Me. The first trailer, released back in June, was more of an initial window into just how well Demetrius Shipp Jr. is going to be able to play this iconic role. The second trailer provides a way more in-depth look at just what this movie is going to be about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZlXHAbX3TY

It starts with a line about police brutality that is still pertinent today. Then, a stunner of a line. “Like all black leaders, you have a bull’s-eye on your back,” Danai Gurira says as Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur. “I ain’t no black leader,” he replies. The trailer goes on to unfurl some pretty violent scenes, but it’s clear this movie is not going to shy away from certain grim realities.

Who knows how this movie will be received. At this juncture, we’re so far away from his death and his mother’s recent passing that it makes this project feel like arguably one of the most important movies about hip-hop ever made. Meanwhile, artists such as Lil Yachty are openly bragging about how they know none of his work. Fair enough, if you were born after he died, that’s marginally understandable.

Because of where we are in hip-hop’s lifetime, these biopics of artists from a certain era are all over the place. The media field has grown, there’s more to draw from and it feels like every six months we get a new flick about someone who was huge back in the day. Tupac is a different beast, though. If nothing else, this second trailer indicates that director Benny Boom’s third feature film will capture viewers well outside of the rap world, just like Tupac did in life.