What Had Happened Was Trending stories on the intersections of race, sports & culture

Obama’s speech on race

The day the Rev. Jeremiah Wright was put in the rearview

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Gucci Mane

is out of jail in time for the long weekend

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Daily Dose: 5/26/16

Another tragic night at a T.I. show, this time in NYC

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Music

President Obama

wants to hear Suboi’s flow. Please let him host a mixtape soon

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Midweek music

These should get you to the end of hump day

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Commentary

Analytics and black people

Do numbers ever lie?

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Bill Cosby

His trial will likely dwarf O.J. Simpson’s, a once unimaginable concept

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Daily Dose: 5/25/16

Vietnam is extremely interested in President Obama

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

New AZ documentary

highlights the Brooklyn native’s ascent and legacy

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Daily Dose: 5/24/16

Man on death row freed decades later due to racially biased jury selection

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Freddie Gray case

Justice system produces familiar results

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Rihanna stole the show at Prince’s tribute

Everything else about it got dragged

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Daily Dose: 5/23/16

Draymond Green involved in low blow

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

No Flex Zone

Unless you’re having fun at the YMCA

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Turn your canvas

to figure out what’s going on with these carpets

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Wild Style

Except not really, it just sort of looks like the movie

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.

Wall bangers

More people should do this

2:20 PMThere was a time when it was believed that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright would torpedo then-Sen. Barack Obama’s first presidential campaign.

Now, FiveThirtyEight gives a week in 2008 the June 17th, 1994-style treatment in a podcast called “Inside The Five-Day Stretch When Obama Found His Voice On Race,” delving into what happened when the controversial pastor’s old sermons hit the media and his campaign team was forced to deal with it. In retrospect, some of the questions Obama dealt with felt more like a court deposition than an interview. Obama defended Wright as a churchgoer and the man who married him and Michelle.

He couldn’t disavow Wright entirely, so he did what he knew best. He made a speech, which he wrote himself. Without the usual trappings of politics. He bet on himself to simply nail it. This deep dive featuring many of the characters involved — David Axelrod (Obama’s chief campaign strategist), Jon Favreau (speechwriter), Valerie Jarrett (White House senior adviser) to name a few — is a detailed look into what happened on the ground in those moments.

Presented in chronological order of news coverage, with commentary from various characters close to the story, this project offers analysis and chalk talk of the moment that turned his campaign around. The show continues to discuss Obama’s growth and public progression as a person willing to discuss race as a public figure, and his blackness in itself.

The rest is history.