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Oddisee opens up to Brownbook

The Sudanese-American rapper breaks down his purpose in the game

1:45 PM

It starts with a traditional Sudanese greeting, an exchange that while it doesn’t necessarily surprise his interviewer certainly appears to be new. That’s how Oddisee, née Amir Mohamed el Khalifa, introduces her to his world, one which is closely connected to his home country of Sudan.

“No one pursues music, professionally,” the former Diamond District rapper starts off. “We are children of the diaspora. There’s no security in anything other than the typical jobs of doctor, lawyer, engineer, pharmaceutical, you know? These are what Sudanese people do. They don’t music. You do that as a hobby. All of my cousins who are doctors all play an instrument. They all love music. They all record themselves at home. But they went to school and they got ‘real jobs,’ you know? I’m the black sheep of the family who did it professionally.”

The rest of the interview is a fascinating look into what is blackness, in the context of the intersection of African and American lives, a topic that throughout his career, Oddisee has tackled with aplomb. His latest lyrical album Alwasta, released in March, “takes its title from the Arabic colloquial term to mean ‘the plug.’ The term ‘wasta’ comes from the Arabic word ‘wasat,’ meaning ‘middle’ or ‘middleman,’ and describes a member of the community who acts as a connector using his or her wealth of social currency,” according to his label.

If you haven’t gotten a chance to spin his latest, The Odd Tape, give it a crack. It’s a perfect instrumental addition to a busy day, from a guy who not only takes his music seriously, but also is in it for the creation of art at its base level.

The entire interview with Brownbook magazine is a fascinating look into the process of one of the most laid-back and fascinating cats in the entirety of the game.

Daily Dose: 10/26/16

A wild night in Cleveland ends well for Ohio

1:45 PM

It starts with a traditional Sudanese greeting, an exchange that while it doesn’t necessarily surprise his interviewer certainly appears to be new. That’s how Oddisee, née Amir Mohamed el Khalifa, introduces her to his world, one which is closely connected to his home country of Sudan.

“No one pursues music, professionally,” the former Diamond District rapper starts off. “We are children of the diaspora. There’s no security in anything other than the typical jobs of doctor, lawyer, engineer, pharmaceutical, you know? These are what Sudanese people do. They don’t music. You do that as a hobby. All of my cousins who are doctors all play an instrument. They all love music. They all record themselves at home. But they went to school and they got ‘real jobs,’ you know? I’m the black sheep of the family who did it professionally.”

The rest of the interview is a fascinating look into what is blackness, in the context of the intersection of African and American lives, a topic that throughout his career, Oddisee has tackled with aplomb. His latest lyrical album Alwasta, released in March, “takes its title from the Arabic colloquial term to mean ‘the plug.’ The term ‘wasta’ comes from the Arabic word ‘wasat,’ meaning ‘middle’ or ‘middleman,’ and describes a member of the community who acts as a connector using his or her wealth of social currency,” according to his label.

If you haven’t gotten a chance to spin his latest, The Odd Tape, give it a crack. It’s a perfect instrumental addition to a busy day, from a guy who not only takes his music seriously, but also is in it for the creation of art at its base level.

The entire interview with Brownbook magazine is a fascinating look into the process of one of the most laid-back and fascinating cats in the entirety of the game.

Daily Dose: 10/25/16

It’s time to get used to The Association, again

1:45 PM

It starts with a traditional Sudanese greeting, an exchange that while it doesn’t necessarily surprise his interviewer certainly appears to be new. That’s how Oddisee, née Amir Mohamed el Khalifa, introduces her to his world, one which is closely connected to his home country of Sudan.

“No one pursues music, professionally,” the former Diamond District rapper starts off. “We are children of the diaspora. There’s no security in anything other than the typical jobs of doctor, lawyer, engineer, pharmaceutical, you know? These are what Sudanese people do. They don’t music. You do that as a hobby. All of my cousins who are doctors all play an instrument. They all love music. They all record themselves at home. But they went to school and they got ‘real jobs,’ you know? I’m the black sheep of the family who did it professionally.”

The rest of the interview is a fascinating look into what is blackness, in the context of the intersection of African and American lives, a topic that throughout his career, Oddisee has tackled with aplomb. His latest lyrical album Alwasta, released in March, “takes its title from the Arabic colloquial term to mean ‘the plug.’ The term ‘wasta’ comes from the Arabic word ‘wasat,’ meaning ‘middle’ or ‘middleman,’ and describes a member of the community who acts as a connector using his or her wealth of social currency,” according to his label.

If you haven’t gotten a chance to spin his latest, The Odd Tape, give it a crack. It’s a perfect instrumental addition to a busy day, from a guy who not only takes his music seriously, but also is in it for the creation of art at its base level.

The entire interview with Brownbook magazine is a fascinating look into the process of one of the most laid-back and fascinating cats in the entirety of the game.

Daily Dose: 10/24/16

Kanye West might boycott the Grammy Awards

1:45 PM

It starts with a traditional Sudanese greeting, an exchange that while it doesn’t necessarily surprise his interviewer certainly appears to be new. That’s how Oddisee, née Amir Mohamed el Khalifa, introduces her to his world, one which is closely connected to his home country of Sudan.

“No one pursues music, professionally,” the former Diamond District rapper starts off. “We are children of the diaspora. There’s no security in anything other than the typical jobs of doctor, lawyer, engineer, pharmaceutical, you know? These are what Sudanese people do. They don’t music. You do that as a hobby. All of my cousins who are doctors all play an instrument. They all love music. They all record themselves at home. But they went to school and they got ‘real jobs,’ you know? I’m the black sheep of the family who did it professionally.”

The rest of the interview is a fascinating look into what is blackness, in the context of the intersection of African and American lives, a topic that throughout his career, Oddisee has tackled with aplomb. His latest lyrical album Alwasta, released in March, “takes its title from the Arabic colloquial term to mean ‘the plug.’ The term ‘wasta’ comes from the Arabic word ‘wasat,’ meaning ‘middle’ or ‘middleman,’ and describes a member of the community who acts as a connector using his or her wealth of social currency,” according to his label.

If you haven’t gotten a chance to spin his latest, The Odd Tape, give it a crack. It’s a perfect instrumental addition to a busy day, from a guy who not only takes his music seriously, but also is in it for the creation of art at its base level.

The entire interview with Brownbook magazine is a fascinating look into the process of one of the most laid-back and fascinating cats in the entirety of the game.