What Had Happened Was Trending stories on the intersections of race, sports & culture

P.K. Subban is going to Nashville

and that’s a good thing for American entertainment

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

All Day Podcast: 6/29/16

BET Awards, Stephon Marbury’s ‘$15 Kicks’ and soccer in black America

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

DeRay McKesson is back

in Baltimore, this time for the school system

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

Daily Dose: 6/29/16

Might LeBron James be leaving Cleveland again?

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

Banana boat life

is now a part of Snapchat

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

NBA

$15 kicks

You can clown them all you want, but Stephon Marbury was trying

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

Daily Dose: 6/28/16

One of the best coaches of our generation is no longer with us

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

Shaq descends on Cuba

to teach kids to play basketball

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

Everything else from the BET Awards

that you might not have caught if you weren’t watching live

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

Daily Dose: 6/27/16

Jesse Williams is the wokest of them all in Hollywood

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

Street Art Sundays

Desmond Mason

is one of the most well-rounded guys the NBA has ever seen

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.

Go Skateboarding Day

was a fun one. Here are some highlights.

2:35 PMOn its surface, it sounds weird.

The biggest star in hockey being traded from the most popular hockey city on the planet, which also happens to be in his native country? Nightmare scenario for a league that is still relatively marginal in many pockets of the country that don’t have a team nor care to. But for Canadian defenseman P.K. Subban, who was traded from the Montreal Canadiens to the Nashville Predators on Wednesday, it might the best thing that’s happened to him in a long time.

The last NHL All-Star Game was in Nashville, Tennessee, and the entire weekend was an interesting display for a town that is emerging as a destination living location for A-listers and a relatively popular place outside of just country music. From a hockey standpoint, which we won’t dwell on, the trade is bizarre. “The Montreal Canadiens have made possibly the worst trade in the history of their franchise, for no reason at all,” Andrew Berkshire wrote Wednesday. “This trade is so lopsided that it’s hard to believe it happened at all.”

Subban is a star. The Toronto-native’s skills are just one part of it. Personalities like his don’t come around leagues like the NHL very often, and aside from the matchups on the ice, having him in any U.S. market is better for him than being stuck in his home country of Canada. With his sense of humor and style, his marketability in a city like Nashville is sure to make his brand shine far brighter than it did from Montreal.

There, of course, he was a legend. The city is losing one of its favorite people. Nobody wants to see that, but there have to be people in the NHL who are applauding this. Nashville is only a wasteland in the context of hockey, but in the American entertainment system, it’s a juggernaut.

P.K. is short for Pernell Karl, which is what he needs to start going by once he moves to Tennessee. The city itself over the past five years has been getting a lot more shine, nationally for what it has to offer. Nowville, Nashvegas, the nicknames keep coming, as corny as they have always been.

“Music celebrities are attracted to a state with no income tax and a ready-made talent pool. But they also just like it,” Kim Severson wrote for The New York Times in 2013. “As if to underscore Nashville’s position in the nation’s musical hierarchy, the city hosted the annual Grammy nomination concert in December. It was the first time the show was not held in Los Angeles.”

He’s been making hockey fun again for some time, and now Nashville will get to see it front and center.