What Had Happened Was Trending stories on the intersections of race, sports & culture

Serena Williams breaks her silence

In powerful Facebook post, Williams addresses police brutality

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.

‘Please Forgive Me’ is not worth your time

unless you’re really into Drake’s action-hero, savior complex

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.

FIFA disbands anti-racism task force

under the assertion that the group’s work is done

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.

Daily Dose: 9/26/16

The big night is finally here

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.

President Obama invites the stars to toast museum opening

Tennessee State University’s band performed on the South Lawn to kick off the event

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.

Video released of Keith Lamont Scott shooting

The 43-year-old victim’s wife captured it on her cellphone

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.

Daily Dose: 9/23/16

Denzel Washington has a new movie out

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.

Music

Let’s talk about The Weeknd

He cut his hair, his new song is fire and we ain’t ready

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.

Daily Dose: 9/22/16

Charlotte may go into lockdown tonight

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.

Colin Kaepernick covers ‘TIME’ magazine

His protest is officially a national discussion point

6:00 PMFor her whole career, Serena Williams’ excellent existence in tennis has been an exercise in activism. Her entire approach to not just her appearance, but her physical game is a demonstration of blackness that turned the tennis world on its head and completely reshaped how America viewed not just black athletes, but black women in general. She has never been shy on speaking her mind or boycotting tournaments, and Tuesday she took to Facebook to address a matter very personal to her.

[protected-iframe id=”33f6105615af1b845794af0021a7f684-84028368-105107678″ info=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSerenaWilliams%2Fposts%2F10154607381941834&width=500″ width=”500″ height=”262″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden” scrolling=”no”]

As protests about the treatment of people of color by police officers spread from the NFL all the way down to the middle school level across the country, Williams’ voice is the most powerful. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has handled the spark he created masterfully, but is still ultimately a backup quarterback. Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, when asked about the state of America, took a similar tact to Williams’ — calling his own family into the discussion.

“It’s a scary thought right now to think if my son gets pulled over, and you tell your kids if you just [comply], and you just listen to the police that they will be respectful and things will work itself out,” James said. “And you see these videos that continue to come out. It’s a scary-ass situation that if my son calls me and said he’s been pulled over, that I’m not that confident that things are going to go well and that my son is going to return home.”

While the NBA is a global league from a culture standpoint and the NFL is the biggest sport in the United States, Williams’ situation is in a different echelon. Her platform, because of the sport she plays and her popularity in general, enters a sphere that few active players in team sports can reach. We’re talking about a woman who crip-walked at the All England Club after winning an Olympic gold medal.

“I am a total believer that not ‘everyone’ is bad. It is just the ones that are ignorant, afraid, uneducated and insensitive that is affecting millions and millions of lives,” she wrote. “But I realized we must stride on — for it’s not how far we have come but how much further still we have to go. I than wondered than have I spoken up? I had to take a look at me. What about my nephews? What if I have a son and what about my daughters? As Dr. Martin Luther King said, ‘There comes a time when silence is betrayal.’ ”

Monday was her 35th birthday. The feeling and personal reflection in that post is palpable and poignant. There are people who believe that perhaps her tennis career is winding down. But she’s still got the behemoth that is Nike on her side and a human side that her fans adore and others are forced to respect. When she talks, people listen. No matter the language. If Williams sets her sights on taking her activism to the next level, both on the court and off, the movement gets a signal boost that no one else can provide.