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Shakyla Hill gets first quadruple-double in women’s D-I hoops in almost 25 years

The Grambling State point guard is first HBCU player to finish with the stat line

2:06 AMIn the waning moments of Grambling State’s 93-71 win over Alabama State on Wednesday night, the Tigers’ Shakyla Hill solidified her place in NCAA women’s basketball history.

With Hill’s assist to Monisha Neal for a 3-pointer, Hill became the first player to finish with a quadruple-double in almost 25 years, as well as the first player (male or female) from a historically black university and the fourth woman overall to complete the feat. The junior guard finished with 15 points, 10 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals.

Hill helped push the Tigers’ (5-8, 2-0 Southwestern Athletic Conference) 40-33 halftime lead to double digits against the Hornets (2-11, 0-2) with her 11 points, 7 rebounds, 7 assists and 6 steals after the break.

Arkansas State’s Sonja Tate was the last woman to record a quadruple-double when she amassed 29 points, 14 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals against Mississippi Valley State on Jan. 27, 1993. On Jan. 14, 1991, Lamar’s Ramona Jones had a quadruple-double — 10-10-10 and 12 steals — against Central Florida.

Two years earlier, on Jan. 14, 1989, Veronica Pettry of Loyola Chicago finished with the first official quadruple-double in women’s Division I history with her 12 points, 10 rebounds, 22 assists and 11 steals.

And unofficially, Louisville’s Jackie Spencer finished with the very first quadruple-double in Division I NCAA history with her 12 points, 12 rebounds, 14 assists and 10 steals against Cincinnati on Feb. 2, 1985. It would take two more years for steals to be considered an official NCAA stat.

Shani Davis qualifies for fifth straight Winter Olympics

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2:06 AMIn the waning moments of Grambling State’s 93-71 win over Alabama State on Wednesday night, the Tigers’ Shakyla Hill solidified her place in NCAA women’s basketball history.

With Hill’s assist to Monisha Neal for a 3-pointer, Hill became the first player to finish with a quadruple-double in almost 25 years, as well as the first player (male or female) from a historically black university and the fourth woman overall to complete the feat. The junior guard finished with 15 points, 10 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals.

Hill helped push the Tigers’ (5-8, 2-0 Southwestern Athletic Conference) 40-33 halftime lead to double digits against the Hornets (2-11, 0-2) with her 11 points, 7 rebounds, 7 assists and 6 steals after the break.

Arkansas State’s Sonja Tate was the last woman to record a quadruple-double when she amassed 29 points, 14 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals against Mississippi Valley State on Jan. 27, 1993. On Jan. 14, 1991, Lamar’s Ramona Jones had a quadruple-double — 10-10-10 and 12 steals — against Central Florida.

Two years earlier, on Jan. 14, 1989, Veronica Pettry of Loyola Chicago finished with the first official quadruple-double in women’s Division I history with her 12 points, 10 rebounds, 22 assists and 11 steals.

And unofficially, Louisville’s Jackie Spencer finished with the very first quadruple-double in Division I NCAA history with her 12 points, 12 rebounds, 14 assists and 10 steals against Cincinnati on Feb. 2, 1985. It would take two more years for steals to be considered an official NCAA stat.

Art Dorrington, the first black professional hockey player in the United States, dies at 87

Rangers signee dubbed the ‘Jackie Robinson of hockey’

2:06 AMIn the waning moments of Grambling State’s 93-71 win over Alabama State on Wednesday night, the Tigers’ Shakyla Hill solidified her place in NCAA women’s basketball history.

With Hill’s assist to Monisha Neal for a 3-pointer, Hill became the first player to finish with a quadruple-double in almost 25 years, as well as the first player (male or female) from a historically black university and the fourth woman overall to complete the feat. The junior guard finished with 15 points, 10 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals.

Hill helped push the Tigers’ (5-8, 2-0 Southwestern Athletic Conference) 40-33 halftime lead to double digits against the Hornets (2-11, 0-2) with her 11 points, 7 rebounds, 7 assists and 6 steals after the break.

Arkansas State’s Sonja Tate was the last woman to record a quadruple-double when she amassed 29 points, 14 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals against Mississippi Valley State on Jan. 27, 1993. On Jan. 14, 1991, Lamar’s Ramona Jones had a quadruple-double — 10-10-10 and 12 steals — against Central Florida.

Two years earlier, on Jan. 14, 1989, Veronica Pettry of Loyola Chicago finished with the first official quadruple-double in women’s Division I history with her 12 points, 10 rebounds, 22 assists and 11 steals.

And unofficially, Louisville’s Jackie Spencer finished with the very first quadruple-double in Division I NCAA history with her 12 points, 12 rebounds, 14 assists and 10 steals against Cincinnati on Feb. 2, 1985. It would take two more years for steals to be considered an official NCAA stat.

Jordan Greenway set to become the first African-American to play for Team USA Hockey at Olympic Games

Boston University standout is one of four collegiate players on the team

2:06 AMIn the waning moments of Grambling State’s 93-71 win over Alabama State on Wednesday night, the Tigers’ Shakyla Hill solidified her place in NCAA women’s basketball history.

With Hill’s assist to Monisha Neal for a 3-pointer, Hill became the first player to finish with a quadruple-double in almost 25 years, as well as the first player (male or female) from a historically black university and the fourth woman overall to complete the feat. The junior guard finished with 15 points, 10 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals.

Hill helped push the Tigers’ (5-8, 2-0 Southwestern Athletic Conference) 40-33 halftime lead to double digits against the Hornets (2-11, 0-2) with her 11 points, 7 rebounds, 7 assists and 6 steals after the break.

Arkansas State’s Sonja Tate was the last woman to record a quadruple-double when she amassed 29 points, 14 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals against Mississippi Valley State on Jan. 27, 1993. On Jan. 14, 1991, Lamar’s Ramona Jones had a quadruple-double — 10-10-10 and 12 steals — against Central Florida.

Two years earlier, on Jan. 14, 1989, Veronica Pettry of Loyola Chicago finished with the first official quadruple-double in women’s Division I history with her 12 points, 10 rebounds, 22 assists and 11 steals.

And unofficially, Louisville’s Jackie Spencer finished with the very first quadruple-double in Division I NCAA history with her 12 points, 12 rebounds, 14 assists and 10 steals against Cincinnati on Feb. 2, 1985. It would take two more years for steals to be considered an official NCAA stat.

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2:06 AMIn the waning moments of Grambling State’s 93-71 win over Alabama State on Wednesday night, the Tigers’ Shakyla Hill solidified her place in NCAA women’s basketball history.

With Hill’s assist to Monisha Neal for a 3-pointer, Hill became the first player to finish with a quadruple-double in almost 25 years, as well as the first player (male or female) from a historically black university and the fourth woman overall to complete the feat. The junior guard finished with 15 points, 10 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals.

Hill helped push the Tigers’ (5-8, 2-0 Southwestern Athletic Conference) 40-33 halftime lead to double digits against the Hornets (2-11, 0-2) with her 11 points, 7 rebounds, 7 assists and 6 steals after the break.

Arkansas State’s Sonja Tate was the last woman to record a quadruple-double when she amassed 29 points, 14 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals against Mississippi Valley State on Jan. 27, 1993. On Jan. 14, 1991, Lamar’s Ramona Jones had a quadruple-double — 10-10-10 and 12 steals — against Central Florida.

Two years earlier, on Jan. 14, 1989, Veronica Pettry of Loyola Chicago finished with the first official quadruple-double in women’s Division I history with her 12 points, 10 rebounds, 22 assists and 11 steals.

And unofficially, Louisville’s Jackie Spencer finished with the very first quadruple-double in Division I NCAA history with her 12 points, 12 rebounds, 14 assists and 10 steals against Cincinnati on Feb. 2, 1985. It would take two more years for steals to be considered an official NCAA stat.

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2:06 AMIn the waning moments of Grambling State’s 93-71 win over Alabama State on Wednesday night, the Tigers’ Shakyla Hill solidified her place in NCAA women’s basketball history.

With Hill’s assist to Monisha Neal for a 3-pointer, Hill became the first player to finish with a quadruple-double in almost 25 years, as well as the first player (male or female) from a historically black university and the fourth woman overall to complete the feat. The junior guard finished with 15 points, 10 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals.

Hill helped push the Tigers’ (5-8, 2-0 Southwestern Athletic Conference) 40-33 halftime lead to double digits against the Hornets (2-11, 0-2) with her 11 points, 7 rebounds, 7 assists and 6 steals after the break.

Arkansas State’s Sonja Tate was the last woman to record a quadruple-double when she amassed 29 points, 14 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals against Mississippi Valley State on Jan. 27, 1993. On Jan. 14, 1991, Lamar’s Ramona Jones had a quadruple-double — 10-10-10 and 12 steals — against Central Florida.

Two years earlier, on Jan. 14, 1989, Veronica Pettry of Loyola Chicago finished with the first official quadruple-double in women’s Division I history with her 12 points, 10 rebounds, 22 assists and 11 steals.

And unofficially, Louisville’s Jackie Spencer finished with the very first quadruple-double in Division I NCAA history with her 12 points, 12 rebounds, 14 assists and 10 steals against Cincinnati on Feb. 2, 1985. It would take two more years for steals to be considered an official NCAA stat.