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Southern University is first HBCU to get into medical marijuana

It’s agricultural research center gets $7 million in grants

9:43 AMSomebody had to be first.

Southern University and A&M College owns the distinction as the first historically black college or university (HBCU) to launch a medical marijuana program.

The Baton Rouge, Louisiana-based HBCU, known for its nationally acclaimed Fabulous Dancing Dolls, launched the program after a contract with Advanced Biomedics, a Louisiana-based company specializing in pharmaceutical-grade marijuana products, was approved on May 25, Baton Rouge news source WAFB reported.

What does this mean, you ask? Depends on whom you ask.

“This is a momentous event,” said Bobby R. Phills, chancellor of the Southern University Ag Center and dean of the College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences. “We are extremely excited to be able to provide quality medicine for the citizens of Louisiana. This groundbreaking research opportunity will also provide revenue for the University and economic development in North Baton Rouge.”

The Southern University Agricultural Center is currently awaiting the completion of background checks from the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry as part of the completion process, and the university plans to construct a facility on a 176-acre plot of land in Baker, Louisiana.

Southern University now joins Louisiana State University in the cannabis ranks, with both public schools set to cultivate and research marijuana in campus facilities in the state, which legalized the substance in 2016 but prohibited recreational use.

The school, which focuses on livestock, farming research and community education, will oversee the program, according to the report provided. The contract with Advanced Biomedics is set to automatically renew its agreement with the school for two consecutive five-year periods, leading to the assumption that this is a long-term partnership.

Southern University’s product will be ready for distribution at Louisiana dispensaries in early 2019, and the university is set to make a healthy amount from the marijuana facilities.

The Agricultural Research Center will receive $6 million, and Southern will get a $1 million signing bonus with each contract renewal.

Clearly it pays to be first.

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9:43 AMSomebody had to be first.

Southern University and A&M College owns the distinction as the first historically black college or university (HBCU) to launch a medical marijuana program.

The Baton Rouge, Louisiana-based HBCU, known for its nationally acclaimed Fabulous Dancing Dolls, launched the program after a contract with Advanced Biomedics, a Louisiana-based company specializing in pharmaceutical-grade marijuana products, was approved on May 25, Baton Rouge news source WAFB reported.

What does this mean, you ask? Depends on whom you ask.

“This is a momentous event,” said Bobby R. Phills, chancellor of the Southern University Ag Center and dean of the College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences. “We are extremely excited to be able to provide quality medicine for the citizens of Louisiana. This groundbreaking research opportunity will also provide revenue for the University and economic development in North Baton Rouge.”

The Southern University Agricultural Center is currently awaiting the completion of background checks from the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry as part of the completion process, and the university plans to construct a facility on a 176-acre plot of land in Baker, Louisiana.

Southern University now joins Louisiana State University in the cannabis ranks, with both public schools set to cultivate and research marijuana in campus facilities in the state, which legalized the substance in 2016 but prohibited recreational use.

The school, which focuses on livestock, farming research and community education, will oversee the program, according to the report provided. The contract with Advanced Biomedics is set to automatically renew its agreement with the school for two consecutive five-year periods, leading to the assumption that this is a long-term partnership.

Southern University’s product will be ready for distribution at Louisiana dispensaries in early 2019, and the university is set to make a healthy amount from the marijuana facilities.

The Agricultural Research Center will receive $6 million, and Southern will get a $1 million signing bonus with each contract renewal.

Clearly it pays to be first.

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9:43 AMSomebody had to be first.

Southern University and A&M College owns the distinction as the first historically black college or university (HBCU) to launch a medical marijuana program.

The Baton Rouge, Louisiana-based HBCU, known for its nationally acclaimed Fabulous Dancing Dolls, launched the program after a contract with Advanced Biomedics, a Louisiana-based company specializing in pharmaceutical-grade marijuana products, was approved on May 25, Baton Rouge news source WAFB reported.

What does this mean, you ask? Depends on whom you ask.

“This is a momentous event,” said Bobby R. Phills, chancellor of the Southern University Ag Center and dean of the College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences. “We are extremely excited to be able to provide quality medicine for the citizens of Louisiana. This groundbreaking research opportunity will also provide revenue for the University and economic development in North Baton Rouge.”

The Southern University Agricultural Center is currently awaiting the completion of background checks from the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry as part of the completion process, and the university plans to construct a facility on a 176-acre plot of land in Baker, Louisiana.

Southern University now joins Louisiana State University in the cannabis ranks, with both public schools set to cultivate and research marijuana in campus facilities in the state, which legalized the substance in 2016 but prohibited recreational use.

The school, which focuses on livestock, farming research and community education, will oversee the program, according to the report provided. The contract with Advanced Biomedics is set to automatically renew its agreement with the school for two consecutive five-year periods, leading to the assumption that this is a long-term partnership.

Southern University’s product will be ready for distribution at Louisiana dispensaries in early 2019, and the university is set to make a healthy amount from the marijuana facilities.

The Agricultural Research Center will receive $6 million, and Southern will get a $1 million signing bonus with each contract renewal.

Clearly it pays to be first.

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‘Maybe it can stand as a pillar of equality’

9:43 AMSomebody had to be first.

Southern University and A&M College owns the distinction as the first historically black college or university (HBCU) to launch a medical marijuana program.

The Baton Rouge, Louisiana-based HBCU, known for its nationally acclaimed Fabulous Dancing Dolls, launched the program after a contract with Advanced Biomedics, a Louisiana-based company specializing in pharmaceutical-grade marijuana products, was approved on May 25, Baton Rouge news source WAFB reported.

What does this mean, you ask? Depends on whom you ask.

“This is a momentous event,” said Bobby R. Phills, chancellor of the Southern University Ag Center and dean of the College of Agricultural, Family and Consumer Sciences. “We are extremely excited to be able to provide quality medicine for the citizens of Louisiana. This groundbreaking research opportunity will also provide revenue for the University and economic development in North Baton Rouge.”

The Southern University Agricultural Center is currently awaiting the completion of background checks from the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry as part of the completion process, and the university plans to construct a facility on a 176-acre plot of land in Baker, Louisiana.

Southern University now joins Louisiana State University in the cannabis ranks, with both public schools set to cultivate and research marijuana in campus facilities in the state, which legalized the substance in 2016 but prohibited recreational use.

The school, which focuses on livestock, farming research and community education, will oversee the program, according to the report provided. The contract with Advanced Biomedics is set to automatically renew its agreement with the school for two consecutive five-year periods, leading to the assumption that this is a long-term partnership.

Southern University’s product will be ready for distribution at Louisiana dispensaries in early 2019, and the university is set to make a healthy amount from the marijuana facilities.

The Agricultural Research Center will receive $6 million, and Southern will get a $1 million signing bonus with each contract renewal.

Clearly it pays to be first.