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The Hollywood ‘Black Panther’ premiere brings out black film glitterati in full force

To rousing cheers and standing ovations from glamorous stars, the long-awaited film arrives

9:15 AMHOLLYWOOD, California — Director Ryan Coogler stood onstage next to Marvel film executives, microphone in hand, and introduced his cast of Black Panther one by one. He could barely get his first welcoming words out before audience members leaped to their feet to give him a standing ovation — the first of several throughout the night at the film’s world premiere at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre — an event almost unheard of, even at a place designed to celebrate such an accomplishment.

No one knew as he was bringing out his cast whether this film was any good. What they did know was that this was a moment. When Sterling K. Brown stood onstage after his introduction, he raised one fist in the air with the kind of conviction that Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos did on the Olympic podium in Mexico City almost 50 years ago. It was yet another moment when the crowd erupted into applause, and again, the first credit had yet to roll for the film. But this was a celebration. And most of black Hollywood, along with notable Hollywood dignitaries, was there to witness.

Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved.

There was no bad seat in the Dolby Theatre. On the main floor, people such as Jamie Foxx, Donald Glover, Kendrick Lamar, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monáe, Reggie Hudlin, Lena Waithe, Usher, Yara Shahidi, Elizabeth Banks and George Lucas sat among the film’s stars, who included Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker and Andy Serkis.

Lupita Nyong’o attends the Los Angeles premiere of Black Panther at Dolby Theatre on Jan. 29 in Hollywood, California.

Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic

Up in the mezzanine sat notables such as director Ava DuVernay and actors such as Tessa Thompson, Issa Rae, David Oyelowo, and many, many others who all gathered to watch the film they’d been waiting years for.


A Black Panther feature film was announced more than three years ago, on Oct. 28, 2014, and since then an ever-growing fan base has been waiting with bated breath for the world premiere. The film’s arrival has been the subject of hilarious memes, Twitter polls and Facebook status updates, all backed up by impressive presales from Fandango. Deadline reported that “after tickets went on sale Monday night, Black Panther is already outstripping Captain America: Civil War as Fandango’s best-selling MCU [Marvel Cinematic Universe] title in the first 24 hours of presales. Captain America: Civil War kicked off the opening of summer 2016 during the first weekend of May with $179M.”

Finally, that day is here — for the lucky ones. Fans crowded the red carpet before the Dolby Theatre on Monday night just to get a glimpse of the cast (and their famous admirers) as they posed and did celebratory victory laps. As per usual, with a film of this magnitude, mobile phones were bagged and placed into security bags before anyone was allowed inside. Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved. This crowd, of course, is most certainly the blackest premiere crowd for a film of this magnitude.

A rousing cheer went up in the theater just as the lights were dimmed, and by the time Coogler’s epic story of the Black Panther’s homeland, the fictional African country of Wakanda, was done, the applause and cheers were even greater. It’s a moment, and it’s a moment that was witnessed by some of the biggest giants in the industry.

We’re not allowed to offer up plot points or spoilers — fans wouldn’t want that anyway! — until an official review embargo is lifted: It’s set for Feb. 6 at noon EST, but we can tell you that the film is quite magical. And very authentically black — both in nuanced ways, and overtly — and, importantly, it’s very, very good. It falls right in line with what we’ve come to expect from Marvel productions.

And as the even luckier ones who attended the screening poured into the Hollywood Roosevelt across the street, wrists draped in hot pink bands signaling they had entrance into the intimate after-party, the celebration continued. Directors F. Gary Gray and John Singleton and producer Kenya Barris were among the crowd feasting on turkey meatballs, mac ’n’ cheese and sweet potato fries as tunes by Mary J. Blige, Chubb Rock, Bobby Brown and Bruno Mars soundtracked the night.

A long line of well-wishers greeted Coogler — most of his family from his hometown of Oakland, California, were there — and Nyong’o at one point entertained a crowd under a tent while bopping to Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow.”

By the time Frankie Beverly and Maze’s “Before I Let Go” dropped, the party felt every bit of a backyard boogie. Folks such as Meagan Good and her studio executive husband DeVon Franklin were among the last to trickle out as the after-party came to a close around 1:30 a.m. And even then, no one really wanted to go home and end the night.

The film will finally be released on Feb. 16, in the thick of Black History Month, and just about everyone in attendance is eager to see how well the film will be received by a large, general-interest viewing audience. But if Monday night’s premiere was any indication? Well, in the words of a Kendrick Lamar song that felt every bit a theme of the night’s festivities, “we gon be alright.”

 

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9:15 AMHOLLYWOOD, California — Director Ryan Coogler stood onstage next to Marvel film executives, microphone in hand, and introduced his cast of Black Panther one by one. He could barely get his first welcoming words out before audience members leaped to their feet to give him a standing ovation — the first of several throughout the night at the film’s world premiere at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre — an event almost unheard of, even at a place designed to celebrate such an accomplishment.

No one knew as he was bringing out his cast whether this film was any good. What they did know was that this was a moment. When Sterling K. Brown stood onstage after his introduction, he raised one fist in the air with the kind of conviction that Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos did on the Olympic podium in Mexico City almost 50 years ago. It was yet another moment when the crowd erupted into applause, and again, the first credit had yet to roll for the film. But this was a celebration. And most of black Hollywood, along with notable Hollywood dignitaries, was there to witness.

Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved.

There was no bad seat in the Dolby Theatre. On the main floor, people such as Jamie Foxx, Donald Glover, Kendrick Lamar, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monáe, Reggie Hudlin, Lena Waithe, Usher, Yara Shahidi, Elizabeth Banks and George Lucas sat among the film’s stars, who included Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker and Andy Serkis.

Lupita Nyong’o attends the Los Angeles premiere of Black Panther at Dolby Theatre on Jan. 29 in Hollywood, California.

Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic

Up in the mezzanine sat notables such as director Ava DuVernay and actors such as Tessa Thompson, Issa Rae, David Oyelowo, and many, many others who all gathered to watch the film they’d been waiting years for.


A Black Panther feature film was announced more than three years ago, on Oct. 28, 2014, and since then an ever-growing fan base has been waiting with bated breath for the world premiere. The film’s arrival has been the subject of hilarious memes, Twitter polls and Facebook status updates, all backed up by impressive presales from Fandango. Deadline reported that “after tickets went on sale Monday night, Black Panther is already outstripping Captain America: Civil War as Fandango’s best-selling MCU [Marvel Cinematic Universe] title in the first 24 hours of presales. Captain America: Civil War kicked off the opening of summer 2016 during the first weekend of May with $179M.”

Finally, that day is here — for the lucky ones. Fans crowded the red carpet before the Dolby Theatre on Monday night just to get a glimpse of the cast (and their famous admirers) as they posed and did celebratory victory laps. As per usual, with a film of this magnitude, mobile phones were bagged and placed into security bags before anyone was allowed inside. Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved. This crowd, of course, is most certainly the blackest premiere crowd for a film of this magnitude.

A rousing cheer went up in the theater just as the lights were dimmed, and by the time Coogler’s epic story of the Black Panther’s homeland, the fictional African country of Wakanda, was done, the applause and cheers were even greater. It’s a moment, and it’s a moment that was witnessed by some of the biggest giants in the industry.

We’re not allowed to offer up plot points or spoilers — fans wouldn’t want that anyway! — until an official review embargo is lifted: It’s set for Feb. 6 at noon EST, but we can tell you that the film is quite magical. And very authentically black — both in nuanced ways, and overtly — and, importantly, it’s very, very good. It falls right in line with what we’ve come to expect from Marvel productions.

And as the even luckier ones who attended the screening poured into the Hollywood Roosevelt across the street, wrists draped in hot pink bands signaling they had entrance into the intimate after-party, the celebration continued. Directors F. Gary Gray and John Singleton and producer Kenya Barris were among the crowd feasting on turkey meatballs, mac ’n’ cheese and sweet potato fries as tunes by Mary J. Blige, Chubb Rock, Bobby Brown and Bruno Mars soundtracked the night.

A long line of well-wishers greeted Coogler — most of his family from his hometown of Oakland, California, were there — and Nyong’o at one point entertained a crowd under a tent while bopping to Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow.”

By the time Frankie Beverly and Maze’s “Before I Let Go” dropped, the party felt every bit of a backyard boogie. Folks such as Meagan Good and her studio executive husband DeVon Franklin were among the last to trickle out as the after-party came to a close around 1:30 a.m. And even then, no one really wanted to go home and end the night.

The film will finally be released on Feb. 16, in the thick of Black History Month, and just about everyone in attendance is eager to see how well the film will be received by a large, general-interest viewing audience. But if Monday night’s premiere was any indication? Well, in the words of a Kendrick Lamar song that felt every bit a theme of the night’s festivities, “we gon be alright.”

 

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9:15 AMHOLLYWOOD, California — Director Ryan Coogler stood onstage next to Marvel film executives, microphone in hand, and introduced his cast of Black Panther one by one. He could barely get his first welcoming words out before audience members leaped to their feet to give him a standing ovation — the first of several throughout the night at the film’s world premiere at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre — an event almost unheard of, even at a place designed to celebrate such an accomplishment.

No one knew as he was bringing out his cast whether this film was any good. What they did know was that this was a moment. When Sterling K. Brown stood onstage after his introduction, he raised one fist in the air with the kind of conviction that Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos did on the Olympic podium in Mexico City almost 50 years ago. It was yet another moment when the crowd erupted into applause, and again, the first credit had yet to roll for the film. But this was a celebration. And most of black Hollywood, along with notable Hollywood dignitaries, was there to witness.

Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved.

There was no bad seat in the Dolby Theatre. On the main floor, people such as Jamie Foxx, Donald Glover, Kendrick Lamar, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monáe, Reggie Hudlin, Lena Waithe, Usher, Yara Shahidi, Elizabeth Banks and George Lucas sat among the film’s stars, who included Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker and Andy Serkis.

Lupita Nyong’o attends the Los Angeles premiere of Black Panther at Dolby Theatre on Jan. 29 in Hollywood, California.

Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic

Up in the mezzanine sat notables such as director Ava DuVernay and actors such as Tessa Thompson, Issa Rae, David Oyelowo, and many, many others who all gathered to watch the film they’d been waiting years for.


A Black Panther feature film was announced more than three years ago, on Oct. 28, 2014, and since then an ever-growing fan base has been waiting with bated breath for the world premiere. The film’s arrival has been the subject of hilarious memes, Twitter polls and Facebook status updates, all backed up by impressive presales from Fandango. Deadline reported that “after tickets went on sale Monday night, Black Panther is already outstripping Captain America: Civil War as Fandango’s best-selling MCU [Marvel Cinematic Universe] title in the first 24 hours of presales. Captain America: Civil War kicked off the opening of summer 2016 during the first weekend of May with $179M.”

Finally, that day is here — for the lucky ones. Fans crowded the red carpet before the Dolby Theatre on Monday night just to get a glimpse of the cast (and their famous admirers) as they posed and did celebratory victory laps. As per usual, with a film of this magnitude, mobile phones were bagged and placed into security bags before anyone was allowed inside. Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved. This crowd, of course, is most certainly the blackest premiere crowd for a film of this magnitude.

A rousing cheer went up in the theater just as the lights were dimmed, and by the time Coogler’s epic story of the Black Panther’s homeland, the fictional African country of Wakanda, was done, the applause and cheers were even greater. It’s a moment, and it’s a moment that was witnessed by some of the biggest giants in the industry.

We’re not allowed to offer up plot points or spoilers — fans wouldn’t want that anyway! — until an official review embargo is lifted: It’s set for Feb. 6 at noon EST, but we can tell you that the film is quite magical. And very authentically black — both in nuanced ways, and overtly — and, importantly, it’s very, very good. It falls right in line with what we’ve come to expect from Marvel productions.

And as the even luckier ones who attended the screening poured into the Hollywood Roosevelt across the street, wrists draped in hot pink bands signaling they had entrance into the intimate after-party, the celebration continued. Directors F. Gary Gray and John Singleton and producer Kenya Barris were among the crowd feasting on turkey meatballs, mac ’n’ cheese and sweet potato fries as tunes by Mary J. Blige, Chubb Rock, Bobby Brown and Bruno Mars soundtracked the night.

A long line of well-wishers greeted Coogler — most of his family from his hometown of Oakland, California, were there — and Nyong’o at one point entertained a crowd under a tent while bopping to Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow.”

By the time Frankie Beverly and Maze’s “Before I Let Go” dropped, the party felt every bit of a backyard boogie. Folks such as Meagan Good and her studio executive husband DeVon Franklin were among the last to trickle out as the after-party came to a close around 1:30 a.m. And even then, no one really wanted to go home and end the night.

The film will finally be released on Feb. 16, in the thick of Black History Month, and just about everyone in attendance is eager to see how well the film will be received by a large, general-interest viewing audience. But if Monday night’s premiere was any indication? Well, in the words of a Kendrick Lamar song that felt every bit a theme of the night’s festivities, “we gon be alright.”

 

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9:15 AMHOLLYWOOD, California — Director Ryan Coogler stood onstage next to Marvel film executives, microphone in hand, and introduced his cast of Black Panther one by one. He could barely get his first welcoming words out before audience members leaped to their feet to give him a standing ovation — the first of several throughout the night at the film’s world premiere at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre — an event almost unheard of, even at a place designed to celebrate such an accomplishment.

No one knew as he was bringing out his cast whether this film was any good. What they did know was that this was a moment. When Sterling K. Brown stood onstage after his introduction, he raised one fist in the air with the kind of conviction that Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos did on the Olympic podium in Mexico City almost 50 years ago. It was yet another moment when the crowd erupted into applause, and again, the first credit had yet to roll for the film. But this was a celebration. And most of black Hollywood, along with notable Hollywood dignitaries, was there to witness.

Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved.

There was no bad seat in the Dolby Theatre. On the main floor, people such as Jamie Foxx, Donald Glover, Kendrick Lamar, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monáe, Reggie Hudlin, Lena Waithe, Usher, Yara Shahidi, Elizabeth Banks and George Lucas sat among the film’s stars, who included Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker and Andy Serkis.

Lupita Nyong’o attends the Los Angeles premiere of Black Panther at Dolby Theatre on Jan. 29 in Hollywood, California.

Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic

Up in the mezzanine sat notables such as director Ava DuVernay and actors such as Tessa Thompson, Issa Rae, David Oyelowo, and many, many others who all gathered to watch the film they’d been waiting years for.


A Black Panther feature film was announced more than three years ago, on Oct. 28, 2014, and since then an ever-growing fan base has been waiting with bated breath for the world premiere. The film’s arrival has been the subject of hilarious memes, Twitter polls and Facebook status updates, all backed up by impressive presales from Fandango. Deadline reported that “after tickets went on sale Monday night, Black Panther is already outstripping Captain America: Civil War as Fandango’s best-selling MCU [Marvel Cinematic Universe] title in the first 24 hours of presales. Captain America: Civil War kicked off the opening of summer 2016 during the first weekend of May with $179M.”

Finally, that day is here — for the lucky ones. Fans crowded the red carpet before the Dolby Theatre on Monday night just to get a glimpse of the cast (and their famous admirers) as they posed and did celebratory victory laps. As per usual, with a film of this magnitude, mobile phones were bagged and placed into security bags before anyone was allowed inside. Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved. This crowd, of course, is most certainly the blackest premiere crowd for a film of this magnitude.

A rousing cheer went up in the theater just as the lights were dimmed, and by the time Coogler’s epic story of the Black Panther’s homeland, the fictional African country of Wakanda, was done, the applause and cheers were even greater. It’s a moment, and it’s a moment that was witnessed by some of the biggest giants in the industry.

We’re not allowed to offer up plot points or spoilers — fans wouldn’t want that anyway! — until an official review embargo is lifted: It’s set for Feb. 6 at noon EST, but we can tell you that the film is quite magical. And very authentically black — both in nuanced ways, and overtly — and, importantly, it’s very, very good. It falls right in line with what we’ve come to expect from Marvel productions.

And as the even luckier ones who attended the screening poured into the Hollywood Roosevelt across the street, wrists draped in hot pink bands signaling they had entrance into the intimate after-party, the celebration continued. Directors F. Gary Gray and John Singleton and producer Kenya Barris were among the crowd feasting on turkey meatballs, mac ’n’ cheese and sweet potato fries as tunes by Mary J. Blige, Chubb Rock, Bobby Brown and Bruno Mars soundtracked the night.

A long line of well-wishers greeted Coogler — most of his family from his hometown of Oakland, California, were there — and Nyong’o at one point entertained a crowd under a tent while bopping to Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow.”

By the time Frankie Beverly and Maze’s “Before I Let Go” dropped, the party felt every bit of a backyard boogie. Folks such as Meagan Good and her studio executive husband DeVon Franklin were among the last to trickle out as the after-party came to a close around 1:30 a.m. And even then, no one really wanted to go home and end the night.

The film will finally be released on Feb. 16, in the thick of Black History Month, and just about everyone in attendance is eager to see how well the film will be received by a large, general-interest viewing audience. But if Monday night’s premiere was any indication? Well, in the words of a Kendrick Lamar song that felt every bit a theme of the night’s festivities, “we gon be alright.”

 

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9:15 AMHOLLYWOOD, California — Director Ryan Coogler stood onstage next to Marvel film executives, microphone in hand, and introduced his cast of Black Panther one by one. He could barely get his first welcoming words out before audience members leaped to their feet to give him a standing ovation — the first of several throughout the night at the film’s world premiere at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre — an event almost unheard of, even at a place designed to celebrate such an accomplishment.

No one knew as he was bringing out his cast whether this film was any good. What they did know was that this was a moment. When Sterling K. Brown stood onstage after his introduction, he raised one fist in the air with the kind of conviction that Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos did on the Olympic podium in Mexico City almost 50 years ago. It was yet another moment when the crowd erupted into applause, and again, the first credit had yet to roll for the film. But this was a celebration. And most of black Hollywood, along with notable Hollywood dignitaries, was there to witness.

Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved.

There was no bad seat in the Dolby Theatre. On the main floor, people such as Jamie Foxx, Donald Glover, Kendrick Lamar, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monáe, Reggie Hudlin, Lena Waithe, Usher, Yara Shahidi, Elizabeth Banks and George Lucas sat among the film’s stars, who included Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker and Andy Serkis.

Lupita Nyong’o attends the Los Angeles premiere of Black Panther at Dolby Theatre on Jan. 29 in Hollywood, California.

Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic

Up in the mezzanine sat notables such as director Ava DuVernay and actors such as Tessa Thompson, Issa Rae, David Oyelowo, and many, many others who all gathered to watch the film they’d been waiting years for.


A Black Panther feature film was announced more than three years ago, on Oct. 28, 2014, and since then an ever-growing fan base has been waiting with bated breath for the world premiere. The film’s arrival has been the subject of hilarious memes, Twitter polls and Facebook status updates, all backed up by impressive presales from Fandango. Deadline reported that “after tickets went on sale Monday night, Black Panther is already outstripping Captain America: Civil War as Fandango’s best-selling MCU [Marvel Cinematic Universe] title in the first 24 hours of presales. Captain America: Civil War kicked off the opening of summer 2016 during the first weekend of May with $179M.”

Finally, that day is here — for the lucky ones. Fans crowded the red carpet before the Dolby Theatre on Monday night just to get a glimpse of the cast (and their famous admirers) as they posed and did celebratory victory laps. As per usual, with a film of this magnitude, mobile phones were bagged and placed into security bags before anyone was allowed inside. Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved. This crowd, of course, is most certainly the blackest premiere crowd for a film of this magnitude.

A rousing cheer went up in the theater just as the lights were dimmed, and by the time Coogler’s epic story of the Black Panther’s homeland, the fictional African country of Wakanda, was done, the applause and cheers were even greater. It’s a moment, and it’s a moment that was witnessed by some of the biggest giants in the industry.

We’re not allowed to offer up plot points or spoilers — fans wouldn’t want that anyway! — until an official review embargo is lifted: It’s set for Feb. 6 at noon EST, but we can tell you that the film is quite magical. And very authentically black — both in nuanced ways, and overtly — and, importantly, it’s very, very good. It falls right in line with what we’ve come to expect from Marvel productions.

And as the even luckier ones who attended the screening poured into the Hollywood Roosevelt across the street, wrists draped in hot pink bands signaling they had entrance into the intimate after-party, the celebration continued. Directors F. Gary Gray and John Singleton and producer Kenya Barris were among the crowd feasting on turkey meatballs, mac ’n’ cheese and sweet potato fries as tunes by Mary J. Blige, Chubb Rock, Bobby Brown and Bruno Mars soundtracked the night.

A long line of well-wishers greeted Coogler — most of his family from his hometown of Oakland, California, were there — and Nyong’o at one point entertained a crowd under a tent while bopping to Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow.”

By the time Frankie Beverly and Maze’s “Before I Let Go” dropped, the party felt every bit of a backyard boogie. Folks such as Meagan Good and her studio executive husband DeVon Franklin were among the last to trickle out as the after-party came to a close around 1:30 a.m. And even then, no one really wanted to go home and end the night.

The film will finally be released on Feb. 16, in the thick of Black History Month, and just about everyone in attendance is eager to see how well the film will be received by a large, general-interest viewing audience. But if Monday night’s premiere was any indication? Well, in the words of a Kendrick Lamar song that felt every bit a theme of the night’s festivities, “we gon be alright.”

 

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9:15 AMHOLLYWOOD, California — Director Ryan Coogler stood onstage next to Marvel film executives, microphone in hand, and introduced his cast of Black Panther one by one. He could barely get his first welcoming words out before audience members leaped to their feet to give him a standing ovation — the first of several throughout the night at the film’s world premiere at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre — an event almost unheard of, even at a place designed to celebrate such an accomplishment.

No one knew as he was bringing out his cast whether this film was any good. What they did know was that this was a moment. When Sterling K. Brown stood onstage after his introduction, he raised one fist in the air with the kind of conviction that Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos did on the Olympic podium in Mexico City almost 50 years ago. It was yet another moment when the crowd erupted into applause, and again, the first credit had yet to roll for the film. But this was a celebration. And most of black Hollywood, along with notable Hollywood dignitaries, was there to witness.

Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved.

There was no bad seat in the Dolby Theatre. On the main floor, people such as Jamie Foxx, Donald Glover, Kendrick Lamar, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monáe, Reggie Hudlin, Lena Waithe, Usher, Yara Shahidi, Elizabeth Banks and George Lucas sat among the film’s stars, who included Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker and Andy Serkis.

Lupita Nyong’o attends the Los Angeles premiere of Black Panther at Dolby Theatre on Jan. 29 in Hollywood, California.

Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic

Up in the mezzanine sat notables such as director Ava DuVernay and actors such as Tessa Thompson, Issa Rae, David Oyelowo, and many, many others who all gathered to watch the film they’d been waiting years for.


A Black Panther feature film was announced more than three years ago, on Oct. 28, 2014, and since then an ever-growing fan base has been waiting with bated breath for the world premiere. The film’s arrival has been the subject of hilarious memes, Twitter polls and Facebook status updates, all backed up by impressive presales from Fandango. Deadline reported that “after tickets went on sale Monday night, Black Panther is already outstripping Captain America: Civil War as Fandango’s best-selling MCU [Marvel Cinematic Universe] title in the first 24 hours of presales. Captain America: Civil War kicked off the opening of summer 2016 during the first weekend of May with $179M.”

Finally, that day is here — for the lucky ones. Fans crowded the red carpet before the Dolby Theatre on Monday night just to get a glimpse of the cast (and their famous admirers) as they posed and did celebratory victory laps. As per usual, with a film of this magnitude, mobile phones were bagged and placed into security bags before anyone was allowed inside. Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved. This crowd, of course, is most certainly the blackest premiere crowd for a film of this magnitude.

A rousing cheer went up in the theater just as the lights were dimmed, and by the time Coogler’s epic story of the Black Panther’s homeland, the fictional African country of Wakanda, was done, the applause and cheers were even greater. It’s a moment, and it’s a moment that was witnessed by some of the biggest giants in the industry.

We’re not allowed to offer up plot points or spoilers — fans wouldn’t want that anyway! — until an official review embargo is lifted: It’s set for Feb. 6 at noon EST, but we can tell you that the film is quite magical. And very authentically black — both in nuanced ways, and overtly — and, importantly, it’s very, very good. It falls right in line with what we’ve come to expect from Marvel productions.

And as the even luckier ones who attended the screening poured into the Hollywood Roosevelt across the street, wrists draped in hot pink bands signaling they had entrance into the intimate after-party, the celebration continued. Directors F. Gary Gray and John Singleton and producer Kenya Barris were among the crowd feasting on turkey meatballs, mac ’n’ cheese and sweet potato fries as tunes by Mary J. Blige, Chubb Rock, Bobby Brown and Bruno Mars soundtracked the night.

A long line of well-wishers greeted Coogler — most of his family from his hometown of Oakland, California, were there — and Nyong’o at one point entertained a crowd under a tent while bopping to Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow.”

By the time Frankie Beverly and Maze’s “Before I Let Go” dropped, the party felt every bit of a backyard boogie. Folks such as Meagan Good and her studio executive husband DeVon Franklin were among the last to trickle out as the after-party came to a close around 1:30 a.m. And even then, no one really wanted to go home and end the night.

The film will finally be released on Feb. 16, in the thick of Black History Month, and just about everyone in attendance is eager to see how well the film will be received by a large, general-interest viewing audience. But if Monday night’s premiere was any indication? Well, in the words of a Kendrick Lamar song that felt every bit a theme of the night’s festivities, “we gon be alright.”

 

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9:15 AMHOLLYWOOD, California — Director Ryan Coogler stood onstage next to Marvel film executives, microphone in hand, and introduced his cast of Black Panther one by one. He could barely get his first welcoming words out before audience members leaped to their feet to give him a standing ovation — the first of several throughout the night at the film’s world premiere at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre — an event almost unheard of, even at a place designed to celebrate such an accomplishment.

No one knew as he was bringing out his cast whether this film was any good. What they did know was that this was a moment. When Sterling K. Brown stood onstage after his introduction, he raised one fist in the air with the kind of conviction that Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos did on the Olympic podium in Mexico City almost 50 years ago. It was yet another moment when the crowd erupted into applause, and again, the first credit had yet to roll for the film. But this was a celebration. And most of black Hollywood, along with notable Hollywood dignitaries, was there to witness.

Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved.

There was no bad seat in the Dolby Theatre. On the main floor, people such as Jamie Foxx, Donald Glover, Kendrick Lamar, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monáe, Reggie Hudlin, Lena Waithe, Usher, Yara Shahidi, Elizabeth Banks and George Lucas sat among the film’s stars, who included Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker and Andy Serkis.

Lupita Nyong’o attends the Los Angeles premiere of Black Panther at Dolby Theatre on Jan. 29 in Hollywood, California.

Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic

Up in the mezzanine sat notables such as director Ava DuVernay and actors such as Tessa Thompson, Issa Rae, David Oyelowo, and many, many others who all gathered to watch the film they’d been waiting years for.


A Black Panther feature film was announced more than three years ago, on Oct. 28, 2014, and since then an ever-growing fan base has been waiting with bated breath for the world premiere. The film’s arrival has been the subject of hilarious memes, Twitter polls and Facebook status updates, all backed up by impressive presales from Fandango. Deadline reported that “after tickets went on sale Monday night, Black Panther is already outstripping Captain America: Civil War as Fandango’s best-selling MCU [Marvel Cinematic Universe] title in the first 24 hours of presales. Captain America: Civil War kicked off the opening of summer 2016 during the first weekend of May with $179M.”

Finally, that day is here — for the lucky ones. Fans crowded the red carpet before the Dolby Theatre on Monday night just to get a glimpse of the cast (and their famous admirers) as they posed and did celebratory victory laps. As per usual, with a film of this magnitude, mobile phones were bagged and placed into security bags before anyone was allowed inside. Last time a Hollywood theater was this jam-packed, there was surely a lightsaber involved. This crowd, of course, is most certainly the blackest premiere crowd for a film of this magnitude.

A rousing cheer went up in the theater just as the lights were dimmed, and by the time Coogler’s epic story of the Black Panther’s homeland, the fictional African country of Wakanda, was done, the applause and cheers were even greater. It’s a moment, and it’s a moment that was witnessed by some of the biggest giants in the industry.

We’re not allowed to offer up plot points or spoilers — fans wouldn’t want that anyway! — until an official review embargo is lifted: It’s set for Feb. 6 at noon EST, but we can tell you that the film is quite magical. And very authentically black — both in nuanced ways, and overtly — and, importantly, it’s very, very good. It falls right in line with what we’ve come to expect from Marvel productions.

And as the even luckier ones who attended the screening poured into the Hollywood Roosevelt across the street, wrists draped in hot pink bands signaling they had entrance into the intimate after-party, the celebration continued. Directors F. Gary Gray and John Singleton and producer Kenya Barris were among the crowd feasting on turkey meatballs, mac ’n’ cheese and sweet potato fries as tunes by Mary J. Blige, Chubb Rock, Bobby Brown and Bruno Mars soundtracked the night.

A long line of well-wishers greeted Coogler — most of his family from his hometown of Oakland, California, were there — and Nyong’o at one point entertained a crowd under a tent while bopping to Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow.”

By the time Frankie Beverly and Maze’s “Before I Let Go” dropped, the party felt every bit of a backyard boogie. Folks such as Meagan Good and her studio executive husband DeVon Franklin were among the last to trickle out as the after-party came to a close around 1:30 a.m. And even then, no one really wanted to go home and end the night.

The film will finally be released on Feb. 16, in the thick of Black History Month, and just about everyone in attendance is eager to see how well the film will be received by a large, general-interest viewing audience. But if Monday night’s premiere was any indication? Well, in the words of a Kendrick Lamar song that felt every bit a theme of the night’s festivities, “we gon be alright.”