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This year’s Emmy nominations are blackish

Record-setting 36 people of color were nominated in acting categories

8:00 AMI had one thought and one thought only after viewing this year’s Emmy nominations:

via GIPHY

The 70th Annual Emmy Awards nominations were announced Thursday, and it seems like the television industry has finally started to get the hint. A record-setting 36 people of color, including 28 of African descent, were nominated across all acting categories. While names such as Donald Glover, Issa Rae and Sterling Brown were expected, others such as Letitia Wright, Tiffany Haddish and Brian Tyree Henry came as welcome surprises.

By far the most surprising nomination was Katt Williams for his role as Willy on Glover’s Atlanta. Talk about a comeback. This man went from getting choked out by a teenager to one of the most memorable roles in television history. The crazy thing was that Glover knew this role would resurrect Williams’ career.

Besides Haddish, Henry, Wright and Williams all earning their first Emmy nominations, most notably Kenan Thompson received his first nod after more than 15 years on Saturday Night Live.

Hollywood’s issues with diversity have been well-documented. Although the film industry has been reluctant to give up old habits, it seems that television is well-aware of America’s shifting demographics. By 2045, minorities are predicted to become the majority group in the United States.

It has taken some time to reverse the damage done by more than a century’s worth of typecasting based on malignant racial stereotypes. While there’s obviously more work to do, shows such as Atlanta and Insecure have done excellent work in showing the diversity of the black experience.

Take actor Tituss Burgess, for example, who received his fourth consecutive Emmy nomination for his supporting role on Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Burgess plays Titus Andromedon, the eccentric yet hysterically lazy gay best friend to the show’s namesake. A decade ago this role was nonexistent because of falsely constructed narratives of black masculinity.

Or take the women on Rae’s HBO comedy Insecure. The show in and of itself seeks to provide an unprecedented, uninhibited look at black womanhood. Even better, it does so with a vulgarity usually reserved for men.

Are these characters perfect portrayals of the archetypes they intend to convey? Far from it. They do, however, add another layer to the complexity of the black experience.

After years of crying for recognition, the convergence of changing demographics with the flux of quality programming has resulted in the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences finally taking notice. And it’s about time.

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8:00 AMI had one thought and one thought only after viewing this year’s Emmy nominations:

via GIPHY

The 70th Annual Emmy Awards nominations were announced Thursday, and it seems like the television industry has finally started to get the hint. A record-setting 36 people of color, including 28 of African descent, were nominated across all acting categories. While names such as Donald Glover, Issa Rae and Sterling Brown were expected, others such as Letitia Wright, Tiffany Haddish and Brian Tyree Henry came as welcome surprises.

By far the most surprising nomination was Katt Williams for his role as Willy on Glover’s Atlanta. Talk about a comeback. This man went from getting choked out by a teenager to one of the most memorable roles in television history. The crazy thing was that Glover knew this role would resurrect Williams’ career.

Besides Haddish, Henry, Wright and Williams all earning their first Emmy nominations, most notably Kenan Thompson received his first nod after more than 15 years on Saturday Night Live.

Hollywood’s issues with diversity have been well-documented. Although the film industry has been reluctant to give up old habits, it seems that television is well-aware of America’s shifting demographics. By 2045, minorities are predicted to become the majority group in the United States.

It has taken some time to reverse the damage done by more than a century’s worth of typecasting based on malignant racial stereotypes. While there’s obviously more work to do, shows such as Atlanta and Insecure have done excellent work in showing the diversity of the black experience.

Take actor Tituss Burgess, for example, who received his fourth consecutive Emmy nomination for his supporting role on Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Burgess plays Titus Andromedon, the eccentric yet hysterically lazy gay best friend to the show’s namesake. A decade ago this role was nonexistent because of falsely constructed narratives of black masculinity.

Or take the women on Rae’s HBO comedy Insecure. The show in and of itself seeks to provide an unprecedented, uninhibited look at black womanhood. Even better, it does so with a vulgarity usually reserved for men.

Are these characters perfect portrayals of the archetypes they intend to convey? Far from it. They do, however, add another layer to the complexity of the black experience.

After years of crying for recognition, the convergence of changing demographics with the flux of quality programming has resulted in the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences finally taking notice. And it’s about time.

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8:00 AMI had one thought and one thought only after viewing this year’s Emmy nominations:

via GIPHY

The 70th Annual Emmy Awards nominations were announced Thursday, and it seems like the television industry has finally started to get the hint. A record-setting 36 people of color, including 28 of African descent, were nominated across all acting categories. While names such as Donald Glover, Issa Rae and Sterling Brown were expected, others such as Letitia Wright, Tiffany Haddish and Brian Tyree Henry came as welcome surprises.

By far the most surprising nomination was Katt Williams for his role as Willy on Glover’s Atlanta. Talk about a comeback. This man went from getting choked out by a teenager to one of the most memorable roles in television history. The crazy thing was that Glover knew this role would resurrect Williams’ career.

Besides Haddish, Henry, Wright and Williams all earning their first Emmy nominations, most notably Kenan Thompson received his first nod after more than 15 years on Saturday Night Live.

Hollywood’s issues with diversity have been well-documented. Although the film industry has been reluctant to give up old habits, it seems that television is well-aware of America’s shifting demographics. By 2045, minorities are predicted to become the majority group in the United States.

It has taken some time to reverse the damage done by more than a century’s worth of typecasting based on malignant racial stereotypes. While there’s obviously more work to do, shows such as Atlanta and Insecure have done excellent work in showing the diversity of the black experience.

Take actor Tituss Burgess, for example, who received his fourth consecutive Emmy nomination for his supporting role on Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Burgess plays Titus Andromedon, the eccentric yet hysterically lazy gay best friend to the show’s namesake. A decade ago this role was nonexistent because of falsely constructed narratives of black masculinity.

Or take the women on Rae’s HBO comedy Insecure. The show in and of itself seeks to provide an unprecedented, uninhibited look at black womanhood. Even better, it does so with a vulgarity usually reserved for men.

Are these characters perfect portrayals of the archetypes they intend to convey? Far from it. They do, however, add another layer to the complexity of the black experience.

After years of crying for recognition, the convergence of changing demographics with the flux of quality programming has resulted in the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences finally taking notice. And it’s about time.

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8:00 AMI had one thought and one thought only after viewing this year’s Emmy nominations:

via GIPHY

The 70th Annual Emmy Awards nominations were announced Thursday, and it seems like the television industry has finally started to get the hint. A record-setting 36 people of color, including 28 of African descent, were nominated across all acting categories. While names such as Donald Glover, Issa Rae and Sterling Brown were expected, others such as Letitia Wright, Tiffany Haddish and Brian Tyree Henry came as welcome surprises.

By far the most surprising nomination was Katt Williams for his role as Willy on Glover’s Atlanta. Talk about a comeback. This man went from getting choked out by a teenager to one of the most memorable roles in television history. The crazy thing was that Glover knew this role would resurrect Williams’ career.

Besides Haddish, Henry, Wright and Williams all earning their first Emmy nominations, most notably Kenan Thompson received his first nod after more than 15 years on Saturday Night Live.

Hollywood’s issues with diversity have been well-documented. Although the film industry has been reluctant to give up old habits, it seems that television is well-aware of America’s shifting demographics. By 2045, minorities are predicted to become the majority group in the United States.

It has taken some time to reverse the damage done by more than a century’s worth of typecasting based on malignant racial stereotypes. While there’s obviously more work to do, shows such as Atlanta and Insecure have done excellent work in showing the diversity of the black experience.

Take actor Tituss Burgess, for example, who received his fourth consecutive Emmy nomination for his supporting role on Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Burgess plays Titus Andromedon, the eccentric yet hysterically lazy gay best friend to the show’s namesake. A decade ago this role was nonexistent because of falsely constructed narratives of black masculinity.

Or take the women on Rae’s HBO comedy Insecure. The show in and of itself seeks to provide an unprecedented, uninhibited look at black womanhood. Even better, it does so with a vulgarity usually reserved for men.

Are these characters perfect portrayals of the archetypes they intend to convey? Far from it. They do, however, add another layer to the complexity of the black experience.

After years of crying for recognition, the convergence of changing demographics with the flux of quality programming has resulted in the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences finally taking notice. And it’s about time.

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8:00 AMI had one thought and one thought only after viewing this year’s Emmy nominations:

via GIPHY

The 70th Annual Emmy Awards nominations were announced Thursday, and it seems like the television industry has finally started to get the hint. A record-setting 36 people of color, including 28 of African descent, were nominated across all acting categories. While names such as Donald Glover, Issa Rae and Sterling Brown were expected, others such as Letitia Wright, Tiffany Haddish and Brian Tyree Henry came as welcome surprises.

By far the most surprising nomination was Katt Williams for his role as Willy on Glover’s Atlanta. Talk about a comeback. This man went from getting choked out by a teenager to one of the most memorable roles in television history. The crazy thing was that Glover knew this role would resurrect Williams’ career.

Besides Haddish, Henry, Wright and Williams all earning their first Emmy nominations, most notably Kenan Thompson received his first nod after more than 15 years on Saturday Night Live.

Hollywood’s issues with diversity have been well-documented. Although the film industry has been reluctant to give up old habits, it seems that television is well-aware of America’s shifting demographics. By 2045, minorities are predicted to become the majority group in the United States.

It has taken some time to reverse the damage done by more than a century’s worth of typecasting based on malignant racial stereotypes. While there’s obviously more work to do, shows such as Atlanta and Insecure have done excellent work in showing the diversity of the black experience.

Take actor Tituss Burgess, for example, who received his fourth consecutive Emmy nomination for his supporting role on Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Burgess plays Titus Andromedon, the eccentric yet hysterically lazy gay best friend to the show’s namesake. A decade ago this role was nonexistent because of falsely constructed narratives of black masculinity.

Or take the women on Rae’s HBO comedy Insecure. The show in and of itself seeks to provide an unprecedented, uninhibited look at black womanhood. Even better, it does so with a vulgarity usually reserved for men.

Are these characters perfect portrayals of the archetypes they intend to convey? Far from it. They do, however, add another layer to the complexity of the black experience.

After years of crying for recognition, the convergence of changing demographics with the flux of quality programming has resulted in the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences finally taking notice. And it’s about time.

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8:00 AMI had one thought and one thought only after viewing this year’s Emmy nominations:

via GIPHY

The 70th Annual Emmy Awards nominations were announced Thursday, and it seems like the television industry has finally started to get the hint. A record-setting 36 people of color, including 28 of African descent, were nominated across all acting categories. While names such as Donald Glover, Issa Rae and Sterling Brown were expected, others such as Letitia Wright, Tiffany Haddish and Brian Tyree Henry came as welcome surprises.

By far the most surprising nomination was Katt Williams for his role as Willy on Glover’s Atlanta. Talk about a comeback. This man went from getting choked out by a teenager to one of the most memorable roles in television history. The crazy thing was that Glover knew this role would resurrect Williams’ career.

Besides Haddish, Henry, Wright and Williams all earning their first Emmy nominations, most notably Kenan Thompson received his first nod after more than 15 years on Saturday Night Live.

Hollywood’s issues with diversity have been well-documented. Although the film industry has been reluctant to give up old habits, it seems that television is well-aware of America’s shifting demographics. By 2045, minorities are predicted to become the majority group in the United States.

It has taken some time to reverse the damage done by more than a century’s worth of typecasting based on malignant racial stereotypes. While there’s obviously more work to do, shows such as Atlanta and Insecure have done excellent work in showing the diversity of the black experience.

Take actor Tituss Burgess, for example, who received his fourth consecutive Emmy nomination for his supporting role on Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Burgess plays Titus Andromedon, the eccentric yet hysterically lazy gay best friend to the show’s namesake. A decade ago this role was nonexistent because of falsely constructed narratives of black masculinity.

Or take the women on Rae’s HBO comedy Insecure. The show in and of itself seeks to provide an unprecedented, uninhibited look at black womanhood. Even better, it does so with a vulgarity usually reserved for men.

Are these characters perfect portrayals of the archetypes they intend to convey? Far from it. They do, however, add another layer to the complexity of the black experience.

After years of crying for recognition, the convergence of changing demographics with the flux of quality programming has resulted in the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences finally taking notice. And it’s about time.