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We’re one game away from a Subban sibling rivalry match in Western Conference finals

Malcolm’s Golden Knights have advanced, while P.K.’s Predators must win a Game 7

5:42 PMIt’s not as if the Las Vegas Golden Knights don’t already have the best story in hockey, if not all of sports.

The 31st team in the National Hockey League, an expansion unit playing in its first season, has advanced to the Western Conference finals. The Knights are the third team in league history to win multiple series in its inaugural season, joining the 1918 Toronto Arenas and 1968 St. Louis Blues.

Similar to the Houston Astros in Major League Baseball, the Knights are playing for a city that is recovering from a tragic ordeal. Before the team’s first game, a domestic terrorist killed 59 people (including himself) and injured 851 in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.

The Knights being one of the last four teams in the Stanley Cup chase may be an even better feel-good story than Loyola’s men’s basketball team making it to the NCAA tournament’s Final Four.

But there could be another feel-good element should the Nashville Predators win their series against the Winnipeg Jets. The Predators beat the Jets, 4-0, on Monday night to force a decisive Game 7 on Thursday.

That would mean another Subban-Subban meeting for hockey fans. Malcolm Subban, the backup goalie for the Knights, talked to The Players’ Tribune about how close he and his brother are and how the two of them make each other better.

P.K. Subban, Malcolm’s older brother, is one of the most popular and fashionable players in the NHL. He has made more of a name for himself on the ice and off it since the Montreal Canadiens traded him to Nashville in 2016. P.K. certainly got the better end of that stick, as he helped the Predators make last season’s Stanley Cup Final.

Little brother has gotten the best of big brother on both occasions the two have squared off. The brothers’ first meeting was in a preseason game on Sept. 16, 2013, when P.K.’s Canadiens welcomed Malcolm’s Boston Bruins.

Malcolm came on in the second period and blocked every shot on goal, including one from his brother, in the Bruins’ 6-3 victory. P.K. conveniently forgot that he even had a shot on goal, while Malcolm was quick to say in jest that it was the slowest shot he saw all night.

When the duo faced each other in their first regular-season matchup this season on Dec. 8, 2017, they became the 10th set of brothers to play against each another with one a skater and another a goaltender. At one point, Malcolm and P.K. made eye contact and sized the other one up as the game moved to overtime and shootouts.

Unlike the preseason game, P.K. and Malcolm wouldn’t go head to head, but the Knights would prevail, 4-3, on a night when Malcolm made a career-high 41 saves.

Karl Subban, P.K.’s and Malcolm’s father, has typically tried to stay neutral in these contests, but he said after the game the family was rooting for the little brother, who has yet to establish himself in the league.

“I think we all see it as Malcolm’s moment, and we don’t even want P.K. to ruin it for him,” Karl Subban told NHL.com. “Please, P.K. and the Preds, don’t ruin it for Malcolm tonight and his teammates.”

If that’s how the family felt for a regular-season game, how exactly is that going to work if the two brothers find themselves fighting for a chance to make the Stanley Cup Final? Will they root for P.K. to get there so the Predators can redeem themselves? Or maybe the Subban family would like to see Malcolm make his first trip to the championship series.

One thing is for certain: Nobody wins when the family feuds, so it doesn’t matter how they do it, but the Subban family has to figure out a way to keep the peace in its household should the two brothers meet.

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5:42 PMIt’s not as if the Las Vegas Golden Knights don’t already have the best story in hockey, if not all of sports.

The 31st team in the National Hockey League, an expansion unit playing in its first season, has advanced to the Western Conference finals. The Knights are the third team in league history to win multiple series in its inaugural season, joining the 1918 Toronto Arenas and 1968 St. Louis Blues.

Similar to the Houston Astros in Major League Baseball, the Knights are playing for a city that is recovering from a tragic ordeal. Before the team’s first game, a domestic terrorist killed 59 people (including himself) and injured 851 in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.

The Knights being one of the last four teams in the Stanley Cup chase may be an even better feel-good story than Loyola’s men’s basketball team making it to the NCAA tournament’s Final Four.

But there could be another feel-good element should the Nashville Predators win their series against the Winnipeg Jets. The Predators beat the Jets, 4-0, on Monday night to force a decisive Game 7 on Thursday.

That would mean another Subban-Subban meeting for hockey fans. Malcolm Subban, the backup goalie for the Knights, talked to The Players’ Tribune about how close he and his brother are and how the two of them make each other better.

P.K. Subban, Malcolm’s older brother, is one of the most popular and fashionable players in the NHL. He has made more of a name for himself on the ice and off it since the Montreal Canadiens traded him to Nashville in 2016. P.K. certainly got the better end of that stick, as he helped the Predators make last season’s Stanley Cup Final.

Little brother has gotten the best of big brother on both occasions the two have squared off. The brothers’ first meeting was in a preseason game on Sept. 16, 2013, when P.K.’s Canadiens welcomed Malcolm’s Boston Bruins.

Malcolm came on in the second period and blocked every shot on goal, including one from his brother, in the Bruins’ 6-3 victory. P.K. conveniently forgot that he even had a shot on goal, while Malcolm was quick to say in jest that it was the slowest shot he saw all night.

When the duo faced each other in their first regular-season matchup this season on Dec. 8, 2017, they became the 10th set of brothers to play against each another with one a skater and another a goaltender. At one point, Malcolm and P.K. made eye contact and sized the other one up as the game moved to overtime and shootouts.

Unlike the preseason game, P.K. and Malcolm wouldn’t go head to head, but the Knights would prevail, 4-3, on a night when Malcolm made a career-high 41 saves.

Karl Subban, P.K.’s and Malcolm’s father, has typically tried to stay neutral in these contests, but he said after the game the family was rooting for the little brother, who has yet to establish himself in the league.

“I think we all see it as Malcolm’s moment, and we don’t even want P.K. to ruin it for him,” Karl Subban told NHL.com. “Please, P.K. and the Preds, don’t ruin it for Malcolm tonight and his teammates.”

If that’s how the family felt for a regular-season game, how exactly is that going to work if the two brothers find themselves fighting for a chance to make the Stanley Cup Final? Will they root for P.K. to get there so the Predators can redeem themselves? Or maybe the Subban family would like to see Malcolm make his first trip to the championship series.

One thing is for certain: Nobody wins when the family feuds, so it doesn’t matter how they do it, but the Subban family has to figure out a way to keep the peace in its household should the two brothers meet.

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5:42 PMIt’s not as if the Las Vegas Golden Knights don’t already have the best story in hockey, if not all of sports.

The 31st team in the National Hockey League, an expansion unit playing in its first season, has advanced to the Western Conference finals. The Knights are the third team in league history to win multiple series in its inaugural season, joining the 1918 Toronto Arenas and 1968 St. Louis Blues.

Similar to the Houston Astros in Major League Baseball, the Knights are playing for a city that is recovering from a tragic ordeal. Before the team’s first game, a domestic terrorist killed 59 people (including himself) and injured 851 in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.

The Knights being one of the last four teams in the Stanley Cup chase may be an even better feel-good story than Loyola’s men’s basketball team making it to the NCAA tournament’s Final Four.

But there could be another feel-good element should the Nashville Predators win their series against the Winnipeg Jets. The Predators beat the Jets, 4-0, on Monday night to force a decisive Game 7 on Thursday.

That would mean another Subban-Subban meeting for hockey fans. Malcolm Subban, the backup goalie for the Knights, talked to The Players’ Tribune about how close he and his brother are and how the two of them make each other better.

P.K. Subban, Malcolm’s older brother, is one of the most popular and fashionable players in the NHL. He has made more of a name for himself on the ice and off it since the Montreal Canadiens traded him to Nashville in 2016. P.K. certainly got the better end of that stick, as he helped the Predators make last season’s Stanley Cup Final.

Little brother has gotten the best of big brother on both occasions the two have squared off. The brothers’ first meeting was in a preseason game on Sept. 16, 2013, when P.K.’s Canadiens welcomed Malcolm’s Boston Bruins.

Malcolm came on in the second period and blocked every shot on goal, including one from his brother, in the Bruins’ 6-3 victory. P.K. conveniently forgot that he even had a shot on goal, while Malcolm was quick to say in jest that it was the slowest shot he saw all night.

When the duo faced each other in their first regular-season matchup this season on Dec. 8, 2017, they became the 10th set of brothers to play against each another with one a skater and another a goaltender. At one point, Malcolm and P.K. made eye contact and sized the other one up as the game moved to overtime and shootouts.

Unlike the preseason game, P.K. and Malcolm wouldn’t go head to head, but the Knights would prevail, 4-3, on a night when Malcolm made a career-high 41 saves.

Karl Subban, P.K.’s and Malcolm’s father, has typically tried to stay neutral in these contests, but he said after the game the family was rooting for the little brother, who has yet to establish himself in the league.

“I think we all see it as Malcolm’s moment, and we don’t even want P.K. to ruin it for him,” Karl Subban told NHL.com. “Please, P.K. and the Preds, don’t ruin it for Malcolm tonight and his teammates.”

If that’s how the family felt for a regular-season game, how exactly is that going to work if the two brothers find themselves fighting for a chance to make the Stanley Cup Final? Will they root for P.K. to get there so the Predators can redeem themselves? Or maybe the Subban family would like to see Malcolm make his first trip to the championship series.

One thing is for certain: Nobody wins when the family feuds, so it doesn’t matter how they do it, but the Subban family has to figure out a way to keep the peace in its household should the two brothers meet.

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5:42 PMIt’s not as if the Las Vegas Golden Knights don’t already have the best story in hockey, if not all of sports.

The 31st team in the National Hockey League, an expansion unit playing in its first season, has advanced to the Western Conference finals. The Knights are the third team in league history to win multiple series in its inaugural season, joining the 1918 Toronto Arenas and 1968 St. Louis Blues.

Similar to the Houston Astros in Major League Baseball, the Knights are playing for a city that is recovering from a tragic ordeal. Before the team’s first game, a domestic terrorist killed 59 people (including himself) and injured 851 in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.

The Knights being one of the last four teams in the Stanley Cup chase may be an even better feel-good story than Loyola’s men’s basketball team making it to the NCAA tournament’s Final Four.

But there could be another feel-good element should the Nashville Predators win their series against the Winnipeg Jets. The Predators beat the Jets, 4-0, on Monday night to force a decisive Game 7 on Thursday.

That would mean another Subban-Subban meeting for hockey fans. Malcolm Subban, the backup goalie for the Knights, talked to The Players’ Tribune about how close he and his brother are and how the two of them make each other better.

P.K. Subban, Malcolm’s older brother, is one of the most popular and fashionable players in the NHL. He has made more of a name for himself on the ice and off it since the Montreal Canadiens traded him to Nashville in 2016. P.K. certainly got the better end of that stick, as he helped the Predators make last season’s Stanley Cup Final.

Little brother has gotten the best of big brother on both occasions the two have squared off. The brothers’ first meeting was in a preseason game on Sept. 16, 2013, when P.K.’s Canadiens welcomed Malcolm’s Boston Bruins.

Malcolm came on in the second period and blocked every shot on goal, including one from his brother, in the Bruins’ 6-3 victory. P.K. conveniently forgot that he even had a shot on goal, while Malcolm was quick to say in jest that it was the slowest shot he saw all night.

When the duo faced each other in their first regular-season matchup this season on Dec. 8, 2017, they became the 10th set of brothers to play against each another with one a skater and another a goaltender. At one point, Malcolm and P.K. made eye contact and sized the other one up as the game moved to overtime and shootouts.

Unlike the preseason game, P.K. and Malcolm wouldn’t go head to head, but the Knights would prevail, 4-3, on a night when Malcolm made a career-high 41 saves.

Karl Subban, P.K.’s and Malcolm’s father, has typically tried to stay neutral in these contests, but he said after the game the family was rooting for the little brother, who has yet to establish himself in the league.

“I think we all see it as Malcolm’s moment, and we don’t even want P.K. to ruin it for him,” Karl Subban told NHL.com. “Please, P.K. and the Preds, don’t ruin it for Malcolm tonight and his teammates.”

If that’s how the family felt for a regular-season game, how exactly is that going to work if the two brothers find themselves fighting for a chance to make the Stanley Cup Final? Will they root for P.K. to get there so the Predators can redeem themselves? Or maybe the Subban family would like to see Malcolm make his first trip to the championship series.

One thing is for certain: Nobody wins when the family feuds, so it doesn’t matter how they do it, but the Subban family has to figure out a way to keep the peace in its household should the two brothers meet.

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5:42 PMIt’s not as if the Las Vegas Golden Knights don’t already have the best story in hockey, if not all of sports.

The 31st team in the National Hockey League, an expansion unit playing in its first season, has advanced to the Western Conference finals. The Knights are the third team in league history to win multiple series in its inaugural season, joining the 1918 Toronto Arenas and 1968 St. Louis Blues.

Similar to the Houston Astros in Major League Baseball, the Knights are playing for a city that is recovering from a tragic ordeal. Before the team’s first game, a domestic terrorist killed 59 people (including himself) and injured 851 in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.

The Knights being one of the last four teams in the Stanley Cup chase may be an even better feel-good story than Loyola’s men’s basketball team making it to the NCAA tournament’s Final Four.

But there could be another feel-good element should the Nashville Predators win their series against the Winnipeg Jets. The Predators beat the Jets, 4-0, on Monday night to force a decisive Game 7 on Thursday.

That would mean another Subban-Subban meeting for hockey fans. Malcolm Subban, the backup goalie for the Knights, talked to The Players’ Tribune about how close he and his brother are and how the two of them make each other better.

P.K. Subban, Malcolm’s older brother, is one of the most popular and fashionable players in the NHL. He has made more of a name for himself on the ice and off it since the Montreal Canadiens traded him to Nashville in 2016. P.K. certainly got the better end of that stick, as he helped the Predators make last season’s Stanley Cup Final.

Little brother has gotten the best of big brother on both occasions the two have squared off. The brothers’ first meeting was in a preseason game on Sept. 16, 2013, when P.K.’s Canadiens welcomed Malcolm’s Boston Bruins.

Malcolm came on in the second period and blocked every shot on goal, including one from his brother, in the Bruins’ 6-3 victory. P.K. conveniently forgot that he even had a shot on goal, while Malcolm was quick to say in jest that it was the slowest shot he saw all night.

When the duo faced each other in their first regular-season matchup this season on Dec. 8, 2017, they became the 10th set of brothers to play against each another with one a skater and another a goaltender. At one point, Malcolm and P.K. made eye contact and sized the other one up as the game moved to overtime and shootouts.

Unlike the preseason game, P.K. and Malcolm wouldn’t go head to head, but the Knights would prevail, 4-3, on a night when Malcolm made a career-high 41 saves.

Karl Subban, P.K.’s and Malcolm’s father, has typically tried to stay neutral in these contests, but he said after the game the family was rooting for the little brother, who has yet to establish himself in the league.

“I think we all see it as Malcolm’s moment, and we don’t even want P.K. to ruin it for him,” Karl Subban told NHL.com. “Please, P.K. and the Preds, don’t ruin it for Malcolm tonight and his teammates.”

If that’s how the family felt for a regular-season game, how exactly is that going to work if the two brothers find themselves fighting for a chance to make the Stanley Cup Final? Will they root for P.K. to get there so the Predators can redeem themselves? Or maybe the Subban family would like to see Malcolm make his first trip to the championship series.

One thing is for certain: Nobody wins when the family feuds, so it doesn’t matter how they do it, but the Subban family has to figure out a way to keep the peace in its household should the two brothers meet.