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WNBA president Lisa Borders leaves post to become president and CEO of Time’s Up

Borders will continue to lead the charge for equality and justice for working women

1:55 PMWNBA president Lisa Borders is stepping down from her current post to become the first president and CEO of Time’s Up.

Borders’ decision to step down as WNBA president comes after three seasons of continuous growth in the league. Since announcing Borders as its new president in 2016, the WNBA has seen its highest regular-season attendance in years, and 2018 was the most watched season in four years. Borders helped to establish player recognition and engagement by livestreaming games on social media platforms such as Twitter, and, for the first time, the popular NBA Live 18 video game included a full roster of WNBA players and teams, according to a press release.

Deputy commissioner Mark Tatum will step in on an interim basis to oversee WNBA operations as the league searches for a new president.

“It has been an honor and my absolute privilege leading the WNBA and being part of what it stands for,” Borders said in a statement. “I want to thank [NBA commissioner] Adam [Silver] for giving me the opportunity and support to help grow this league. I am most proud of the W players for their amazing talents on the court and their dedication to making an impact in their communities. I look forward to continuing my support for the W in my new role with Time’s Up. I will always be the W’s biggest advocate and fan.”

Before joining the WNBA, Borders was vice president of global community affairs at The Coca-Cola Co. and managed and maintained relationships in Mayor Shirley Franklin’s administration during her time as vice mayor of Atlanta. Borders continues to serve on the advisory board of the Association of National Advertisers’ #SeeHer initiative, which was created to eliminate bias against all women from advertising and media. The campaign seeks to increase the accurate portrayals of women and girls in U.S. advertising and media by 20 percent by 2020.

Borders’ new role will allow her to continue the fight for the equality of working women on an even larger platform.

The Time’s Up organization, created in January by women in the entertainment industry to address systemic inequality, sexual assault and harassment in the workplace, has gained traction from celebrity supporters and has raised more than $20 million for its legal defense fund. Since February, more than 20,000 donors and 200 lawyers have volunteered their services to support the movement. And now, with Borders leading the efforts to ensure equality for women in the workplace, the organization is establishing its longevity and proving its dedication to the cause.

“The pursuit of safe, dignified and equal treatment in the workplace as a solution to the abuse of power is a mission that can be fulfilled. With Lisa’s skills and leadership, Time’s Up is now in the best position to achieve what we all started — to create a more positive future for workplace culture and a more powerful network for working women of all kinds,” said television producer and Time’s Up seed funder Shonda Rhimes.

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1:55 PMWNBA president Lisa Borders is stepping down from her current post to become the first president and CEO of Time’s Up.

Borders’ decision to step down as WNBA president comes after three seasons of continuous growth in the league. Since announcing Borders as its new president in 2016, the WNBA has seen its highest regular-season attendance in years, and 2018 was the most watched season in four years. Borders helped to establish player recognition and engagement by livestreaming games on social media platforms such as Twitter, and, for the first time, the popular NBA Live 18 video game included a full roster of WNBA players and teams, according to a press release.

Deputy commissioner Mark Tatum will step in on an interim basis to oversee WNBA operations as the league searches for a new president.

“It has been an honor and my absolute privilege leading the WNBA and being part of what it stands for,” Borders said in a statement. “I want to thank [NBA commissioner] Adam [Silver] for giving me the opportunity and support to help grow this league. I am most proud of the W players for their amazing talents on the court and their dedication to making an impact in their communities. I look forward to continuing my support for the W in my new role with Time’s Up. I will always be the W’s biggest advocate and fan.”

Before joining the WNBA, Borders was vice president of global community affairs at The Coca-Cola Co. and managed and maintained relationships in Mayor Shirley Franklin’s administration during her time as vice mayor of Atlanta. Borders continues to serve on the advisory board of the Association of National Advertisers’ #SeeHer initiative, which was created to eliminate bias against all women from advertising and media. The campaign seeks to increase the accurate portrayals of women and girls in U.S. advertising and media by 20 percent by 2020.

Borders’ new role will allow her to continue the fight for the equality of working women on an even larger platform.

The Time’s Up organization, created in January by women in the entertainment industry to address systemic inequality, sexual assault and harassment in the workplace, has gained traction from celebrity supporters and has raised more than $20 million for its legal defense fund. Since February, more than 20,000 donors and 200 lawyers have volunteered their services to support the movement. And now, with Borders leading the efforts to ensure equality for women in the workplace, the organization is establishing its longevity and proving its dedication to the cause.

“The pursuit of safe, dignified and equal treatment in the workplace as a solution to the abuse of power is a mission that can be fulfilled. With Lisa’s skills and leadership, Time’s Up is now in the best position to achieve what we all started — to create a more positive future for workplace culture and a more powerful network for working women of all kinds,” said television producer and Time’s Up seed funder Shonda Rhimes.

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1:55 PMWNBA president Lisa Borders is stepping down from her current post to become the first president and CEO of Time’s Up.

Borders’ decision to step down as WNBA president comes after three seasons of continuous growth in the league. Since announcing Borders as its new president in 2016, the WNBA has seen its highest regular-season attendance in years, and 2018 was the most watched season in four years. Borders helped to establish player recognition and engagement by livestreaming games on social media platforms such as Twitter, and, for the first time, the popular NBA Live 18 video game included a full roster of WNBA players and teams, according to a press release.

Deputy commissioner Mark Tatum will step in on an interim basis to oversee WNBA operations as the league searches for a new president.

“It has been an honor and my absolute privilege leading the WNBA and being part of what it stands for,” Borders said in a statement. “I want to thank [NBA commissioner] Adam [Silver] for giving me the opportunity and support to help grow this league. I am most proud of the W players for their amazing talents on the court and their dedication to making an impact in their communities. I look forward to continuing my support for the W in my new role with Time’s Up. I will always be the W’s biggest advocate and fan.”

Before joining the WNBA, Borders was vice president of global community affairs at The Coca-Cola Co. and managed and maintained relationships in Mayor Shirley Franklin’s administration during her time as vice mayor of Atlanta. Borders continues to serve on the advisory board of the Association of National Advertisers’ #SeeHer initiative, which was created to eliminate bias against all women from advertising and media. The campaign seeks to increase the accurate portrayals of women and girls in U.S. advertising and media by 20 percent by 2020.

Borders’ new role will allow her to continue the fight for the equality of working women on an even larger platform.

The Time’s Up organization, created in January by women in the entertainment industry to address systemic inequality, sexual assault and harassment in the workplace, has gained traction from celebrity supporters and has raised more than $20 million for its legal defense fund. Since February, more than 20,000 donors and 200 lawyers have volunteered their services to support the movement. And now, with Borders leading the efforts to ensure equality for women in the workplace, the organization is establishing its longevity and proving its dedication to the cause.

“The pursuit of safe, dignified and equal treatment in the workplace as a solution to the abuse of power is a mission that can be fulfilled. With Lisa’s skills and leadership, Time’s Up is now in the best position to achieve what we all started — to create a more positive future for workplace culture and a more powerful network for working women of all kinds,” said television producer and Time’s Up seed funder Shonda Rhimes.