What Had Happened Was Trending stories on the intersections of race, sports & culture

Your spades game needs an upgrade

The 1998 Deck are the cards to get you there

2:04 PMWhen I learned to play spades, I was just a kid. It was in Laura Spelman Hall in Atlanta, where my older sister went to college. That was back in the early ’90s, when posters of Michael Jordan and Isiah Thomas were on her and her roommates’ wall, and long before we knew rap was about to hit a heyday like nothing we’d seen before. It was just me keeping score while sitting on footlockers and changing tapes when the side needed to be switched, all while watching the game.

Spades is obviously the game of choice for most of us, until you graduate into these bid whist streets (it’s the game, but with a kitty!) later in life. Which deck you use, though, typically isn’t a huge deal. Some folks play where the deuce of diamonds is the highest spade, others use jokers in different ways, whatever works. But show up to the cookout or kickback with Khia Jackson’s new 1998 Deck, and you will be very much putting on for the culture.

Jackson’s cards feature hip-hop legends from the ’90s as the face cards, which is brilliant. For all the nostalgia nonsense we have floating around these days, these are genuinely dope without feeling like you’re stuck in a bygone era. The faces on playing cards are old as the hills anyways, so might as well give them an update. By the way, if you want a deck, you can buy them here. Or, if you just want to support the cause, you can check out her Kickstarter here. There’s even a mixtape to go with it.

I can just see the old dad rap heads now yelling about running bostons while yelling out their favorite lyrics from college and high school. Check out this interview that Mass Appeal did with Jackson, who’s been a prolific creative for some time now.

Daily Dose: 8/31/17

Georgia officer says police only shoot black people

2:04 PMWhen I learned to play spades, I was just a kid. It was in Laura Spelman Hall in Atlanta, where my older sister went to college. That was back in the early ’90s, when posters of Michael Jordan and Isiah Thomas were on her and her roommates’ wall, and long before we knew rap was about to hit a heyday like nothing we’d seen before. It was just me keeping score while sitting on footlockers and changing tapes when the side needed to be switched, all while watching the game.

Spades is obviously the game of choice for most of us, until you graduate into these bid whist streets (it’s the game, but with a kitty!) later in life. Which deck you use, though, typically isn’t a huge deal. Some folks play where the deuce of diamonds is the highest spade, others use jokers in different ways, whatever works. But show up to the cookout or kickback with Khia Jackson’s new 1998 Deck, and you will be very much putting on for the culture.

Jackson’s cards feature hip-hop legends from the ’90s as the face cards, which is brilliant. For all the nostalgia nonsense we have floating around these days, these are genuinely dope without feeling like you’re stuck in a bygone era. The faces on playing cards are old as the hills anyways, so might as well give them an update. By the way, if you want a deck, you can buy them here. Or, if you just want to support the cause, you can check out her Kickstarter here. There’s even a mixtape to go with it.

I can just see the old dad rap heads now yelling about running bostons while yelling out their favorite lyrics from college and high school. Check out this interview that Mass Appeal did with Jackson, who’s been a prolific creative for some time now.

‘Ball In The Family’ launches Thursday on Facebook

The basketball family’s reality show will offer behind-the-scenes look at life

2:04 PMWhen I learned to play spades, I was just a kid. It was in Laura Spelman Hall in Atlanta, where my older sister went to college. That was back in the early ’90s, when posters of Michael Jordan and Isiah Thomas were on her and her roommates’ wall, and long before we knew rap was about to hit a heyday like nothing we’d seen before. It was just me keeping score while sitting on footlockers and changing tapes when the side needed to be switched, all while watching the game.

Spades is obviously the game of choice for most of us, until you graduate into these bid whist streets (it’s the game, but with a kitty!) later in life. Which deck you use, though, typically isn’t a huge deal. Some folks play where the deuce of diamonds is the highest spade, others use jokers in different ways, whatever works. But show up to the cookout or kickback with Khia Jackson’s new 1998 Deck, and you will be very much putting on for the culture.

Jackson’s cards feature hip-hop legends from the ’90s as the face cards, which is brilliant. For all the nostalgia nonsense we have floating around these days, these are genuinely dope without feeling like you’re stuck in a bygone era. The faces on playing cards are old as the hills anyways, so might as well give them an update. By the way, if you want a deck, you can buy them here. Or, if you just want to support the cause, you can check out her Kickstarter here. There’s even a mixtape to go with it.

I can just see the old dad rap heads now yelling about running bostons while yelling out their favorite lyrics from college and high school. Check out this interview that Mass Appeal did with Jackson, who’s been a prolific creative for some time now.

Daily Dose: 8/30/17

Black tennis umpire wins EEOC fight with USTA

2:04 PMWhen I learned to play spades, I was just a kid. It was in Laura Spelman Hall in Atlanta, where my older sister went to college. That was back in the early ’90s, when posters of Michael Jordan and Isiah Thomas were on her and her roommates’ wall, and long before we knew rap was about to hit a heyday like nothing we’d seen before. It was just me keeping score while sitting on footlockers and changing tapes when the side needed to be switched, all while watching the game.

Spades is obviously the game of choice for most of us, until you graduate into these bid whist streets (it’s the game, but with a kitty!) later in life. Which deck you use, though, typically isn’t a huge deal. Some folks play where the deuce of diamonds is the highest spade, others use jokers in different ways, whatever works. But show up to the cookout or kickback with Khia Jackson’s new 1998 Deck, and you will be very much putting on for the culture.

Jackson’s cards feature hip-hop legends from the ’90s as the face cards, which is brilliant. For all the nostalgia nonsense we have floating around these days, these are genuinely dope without feeling like you’re stuck in a bygone era. The faces on playing cards are old as the hills anyways, so might as well give them an update. By the way, if you want a deck, you can buy them here. Or, if you just want to support the cause, you can check out her Kickstarter here. There’s even a mixtape to go with it.

I can just see the old dad rap heads now yelling about running bostons while yelling out their favorite lyrics from college and high school. Check out this interview that Mass Appeal did with Jackson, who’s been a prolific creative for some time now.

The spectacle of black pain

CNN interview reveals the difficulty of covering natural disasters

2:04 PMWhen I learned to play spades, I was just a kid. It was in Laura Spelman Hall in Atlanta, where my older sister went to college. That was back in the early ’90s, when posters of Michael Jordan and Isiah Thomas were on her and her roommates’ wall, and long before we knew rap was about to hit a heyday like nothing we’d seen before. It was just me keeping score while sitting on footlockers and changing tapes when the side needed to be switched, all while watching the game.

Spades is obviously the game of choice for most of us, until you graduate into these bid whist streets (it’s the game, but with a kitty!) later in life. Which deck you use, though, typically isn’t a huge deal. Some folks play where the deuce of diamonds is the highest spade, others use jokers in different ways, whatever works. But show up to the cookout or kickback with Khia Jackson’s new 1998 Deck, and you will be very much putting on for the culture.

Jackson’s cards feature hip-hop legends from the ’90s as the face cards, which is brilliant. For all the nostalgia nonsense we have floating around these days, these are genuinely dope without feeling like you’re stuck in a bygone era. The faces on playing cards are old as the hills anyways, so might as well give them an update. By the way, if you want a deck, you can buy them here. Or, if you just want to support the cause, you can check out her Kickstarter here. There’s even a mixtape to go with it.

I can just see the old dad rap heads now yelling about running bostons while yelling out their favorite lyrics from college and high school. Check out this interview that Mass Appeal did with Jackson, who’s been a prolific creative for some time now.

Daily Dose: 8/29/17

Chicago officer convicted of unreasonable force

2:04 PMWhen I learned to play spades, I was just a kid. It was in Laura Spelman Hall in Atlanta, where my older sister went to college. That was back in the early ’90s, when posters of Michael Jordan and Isiah Thomas were on her and her roommates’ wall, and long before we knew rap was about to hit a heyday like nothing we’d seen before. It was just me keeping score while sitting on footlockers and changing tapes when the side needed to be switched, all while watching the game.

Spades is obviously the game of choice for most of us, until you graduate into these bid whist streets (it’s the game, but with a kitty!) later in life. Which deck you use, though, typically isn’t a huge deal. Some folks play where the deuce of diamonds is the highest spade, others use jokers in different ways, whatever works. But show up to the cookout or kickback with Khia Jackson’s new 1998 Deck, and you will be very much putting on for the culture.

Jackson’s cards feature hip-hop legends from the ’90s as the face cards, which is brilliant. For all the nostalgia nonsense we have floating around these days, these are genuinely dope without feeling like you’re stuck in a bygone era. The faces on playing cards are old as the hills anyways, so might as well give them an update. By the way, if you want a deck, you can buy them here. Or, if you just want to support the cause, you can check out her Kickstarter here. There’s even a mixtape to go with it.

I can just see the old dad rap heads now yelling about running bostons while yelling out their favorite lyrics from college and high school. Check out this interview that Mass Appeal did with Jackson, who’s been a prolific creative for some time now.

The Morning Roast: 8/27/17

All good things must come to an end

2:04 PMWhen I learned to play spades, I was just a kid. It was in Laura Spelman Hall in Atlanta, where my older sister went to college. That was back in the early ’90s, when posters of Michael Jordan and Isiah Thomas were on her and her roommates’ wall, and long before we knew rap was about to hit a heyday like nothing we’d seen before. It was just me keeping score while sitting on footlockers and changing tapes when the side needed to be switched, all while watching the game.

Spades is obviously the game of choice for most of us, until you graduate into these bid whist streets (it’s the game, but with a kitty!) later in life. Which deck you use, though, typically isn’t a huge deal. Some folks play where the deuce of diamonds is the highest spade, others use jokers in different ways, whatever works. But show up to the cookout or kickback with Khia Jackson’s new 1998 Deck, and you will be very much putting on for the culture.

Jackson’s cards feature hip-hop legends from the ’90s as the face cards, which is brilliant. For all the nostalgia nonsense we have floating around these days, these are genuinely dope without feeling like you’re stuck in a bygone era. The faces on playing cards are old as the hills anyways, so might as well give them an update. By the way, if you want a deck, you can buy them here. Or, if you just want to support the cause, you can check out her Kickstarter here. There’s even a mixtape to go with it.

I can just see the old dad rap heads now yelling about running bostons while yelling out their favorite lyrics from college and high school. Check out this interview that Mass Appeal did with Jackson, who’s been a prolific creative for some time now.

Daily Dose: 8/28/17

Texas tries to battle Hurricane Harvey

2:04 PMWhen I learned to play spades, I was just a kid. It was in Laura Spelman Hall in Atlanta, where my older sister went to college. That was back in the early ’90s, when posters of Michael Jordan and Isiah Thomas were on her and her roommates’ wall, and long before we knew rap was about to hit a heyday like nothing we’d seen before. It was just me keeping score while sitting on footlockers and changing tapes when the side needed to be switched, all while watching the game.

Spades is obviously the game of choice for most of us, until you graduate into these bid whist streets (it’s the game, but with a kitty!) later in life. Which deck you use, though, typically isn’t a huge deal. Some folks play where the deuce of diamonds is the highest spade, others use jokers in different ways, whatever works. But show up to the cookout or kickback with Khia Jackson’s new 1998 Deck, and you will be very much putting on for the culture.

Jackson’s cards feature hip-hop legends from the ’90s as the face cards, which is brilliant. For all the nostalgia nonsense we have floating around these days, these are genuinely dope without feeling like you’re stuck in a bygone era. The faces on playing cards are old as the hills anyways, so might as well give them an update. By the way, if you want a deck, you can buy them here. Or, if you just want to support the cause, you can check out her Kickstarter here. There’s even a mixtape to go with it.

I can just see the old dad rap heads now yelling about running bostons while yelling out their favorite lyrics from college and high school. Check out this interview that Mass Appeal did with Jackson, who’s been a prolific creative for some time now.