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Rae Sremmurd’s recent ‘The FADER’ cover received some backlash due to its perceived “gay” overtones. Is there too much fear of black male affection in our culture?

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Masculinity is narrow and full of double standards. There are so many rules in place for what is acceptable behavior when you are a male and that small window is troublesome. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the Rae Sremmurd Fader cover. The only thing wrong is that we live in a society that has a such a level of homophobia that masculinity of the cover even begs a question.

ABSOUTLELY! this is very deep as far as the origins but we can’t change ideologies if they origins of them are understood and acknowledged. So I guess brothas will sill have these issues until they and we as society are ready to amend the idea of masculinity as it stands.

As a black man and father to 2 boys I’m very affectionate with my children. I always would hug or kiss them on the cheek in public. All people of the opposite color would do is smile. Especially the women they loved to see me and my boys together and I’m heavily tatted.

Yes. Most definitely. Let me tell you something (in my Kevin hart voice).. my Father, scares me. Why? I could not tell you. My brother.. I remember I had to sleep in the same bed as him once. If I even came close to touching him, he’d punch me. I could only imagine how some of these kids grow up without father figures. You don’t really see the image of a Black Father and Son together too often. It’s not just Black Culture either. There have been numerous times “Gay” jokes are on TV. It’s frowned upon unfortunately.

Yes, there is a fear. To say that there isn’t would be foolish. The real question is why is there fear? If you are comfortable in your own skin as a Black man in this country, why should you be afraid to show affection to another man that you call your brother, father, cousin, friend, etc. If I love another person, be it romantically or in a familial sense, I should be able to show affection. Who cares if you THINK I’m gay? I KNOW I’m not and even if I was, what’s the problem?

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IT’S NOT REALLY FEAR. IT’S MORE A TOTAL REJECTION OF ALL THAT USED TO BE LOOKED UPON AS RIGHT. IN REFERENCE TO BLACK HOOD CULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES, FAR TOO MANY BLACK PEOPLE HAVE BEEN TOO COWARDLY IN CONDEMNING CERTAIN DETRIMENTAL BEHAVIORS. BY EMBRACING PRISON LIFE, CRIMINAL LIFE, AND A PERSONA THAT MUST ALWAYS DENOUNCE BEING KIND, SMILING, HUGGING, HOLDING HANDS, OR VERBALLY OR PHYSICALLY EXPRESSING LOVE, IT GOES AGAINST AN INNATE EMOTION WE HAVE AS HUMANS. IN THE END OUR LOVELY YOUNG CHILDREN, AND THEIR BEAUTIFUL MOTHERS HAVE TO ENDURE THE SCARS OF SELF INFLICTED DYSFUNCTION.

Young adolescent and teenage males are a mix of insecurity wrapped up in confidence, sometimes even arrogance; this is anchored by the perception of masculinity. As a teacher, I’ve heard the accusations of homosexuality because one boy accidentally touched another boy on the arm. Just for wearing a pink, or salmon, colored shirt, I’ve been perceived as gay (see my point). Imagine what a shirtless photo, in that pose, will do for two regular students, even if they are brothers, at their local high school.

anytime you use “hyper” as a prefix, you know that you’re describing something artificially enlarged beyond normal bounds. Fathers who are free enough to model healthy emotional affection to their sons produce men who are able to model that same health to their sons. We’ve got a lot of emotionally bound angry young men who are starving for a hug and “I love you, son” from their dads. Street life culture desire has discouraged that normal desire as weak or effeminate or distorted it through the trauma of sexual abuse. homophobia is a reflex response to that distortion…

The people that have an issue with men showing love to other men just seems based in an antiquated version of what masculinity should be. The idea that one can draw a connection between genuine love between two men and that the act is homosexuality is sad, shows a lack of understanding of the complexities of love, and reinforces the myth of masculine yet ignorant black male. Being aggressive doesn’t make a man but showing love for humanity in general does.

1) Blaming Patriarchy is like blaming gravity; it’s too broad. 2)IMHO, the homophobia in hip-hop simply reflects the homophobia in black culture, similar to that in other communities/genres, like country music. Rural and urban areas are the poorest, least educated, and most religious, so they lag behind the rest of society in terms of social development. Give them jobs and decent schools = problem solved. 3) Hip hop isn’t necessarily homophobic. I remember listening to “Tougher than Leather” (Run/DMC) back in the day, and they saved their anger for “sucker MCs”.

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